blowout vs walkaway what difference

what is difference between blowout and walkaway

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbloʊaʊt/

Noun

blowout (plural blowouts)

  1. A sudden puncturing of a pneumatic tyre/tire.
  2. A sudden release of oil and gas from a well.
  3. (slang) A social function, especially one with large quantities of food.
    • 2015, Trish Nicholson, Inside the Crocodile: The Papua New Guinea Journals, Troubador Publishing Ltd (→ISBN)
      Feathers were deeply ruffled when it became known that the BHC had been in town and taken me out for a meal without hosting a big blowout for all the local Brits. I didn’t frequent the hotel bar, and by then, accepted few invitations to parties …
    • 2016, Blayne Cooper, Blind Side of the Moon, Bella Books (→ISBN)
      Chloe’s lips formed a thin line, and she guided her sister a few feet away from Aubrey and Erik, her hooker heels sinking into the shells a little as they went. “C’mon, Jane. Erik’s cousin is a Barnie and is hosting a blowout tonight. The party is in Salem”
  4. (slang) A large or extravagant meal.
    • 2011, Fodor’s Normandy, Brittany & the Best of the North: with Paris
      The dining room at Alain Ducasse’s flagship Paris restaurant gleams with 10,000 crystals, confirming that this is the flashiest place in town for a blowout meal.
    • 2015, Judita Wignall, Raw and Simple Detox: A Delicious Body Reboot for Health, Energy, and Weight Loss (→ISBN), page 46:
      Eating a big blowout meal that probably includes every one of the foods you should be avoiding will trigger more food cravings []
  5. (slang, sports) A sporting contest that is decidedly one-sided and whose outcome is no longer in doubt.
    The game between the two teams was nothing but a blowout.
  6. (slang) An argument; an altercation.
    • 2014, Christine Pope, Star Crossed, page 141:
      The day my aunt and I had talked was just as vivid to me now as it had been eight years ago, when I’d had a blowout with my mother over my decision to go to school in Tucson rather than staying safely up here in northern Arizona.
  7. (geology) A sandy depression in a sand dune ecosystem caused by the removal of sediments by wind.
  8. (Australia) An extreme and unexpected increase in costs, such as in government estimates for a project.
  9. The cleaning of the flues of a boiler from scale, etc., by a blast of steam.
  10. An unsightly flap of skin caused by an ear piercing that is too large.
  11. An instance of having one’s hair blow-dried and styled.
    • 2007, Janis Spindel, How to Date Men: Dating Secrets from America’s Top Matchmaker, Penguin (→ISBN), page 55:
      Get a blowout! Your hair is one of the first things a guy will notice because, hello, it’s right at eye level. So take the time to do it right. No ponytails. No frizzy disasters. Wear your hair down.
    • 2011, Donna Kakonge, PhD Student, The Politics of Black Hair Online Coursebook (→ISBN):
      I mean, how did the African sista’ who was getting her hair braided in the first movie get a ‘blowout? And the slave trader’s shirt wasn’t even right! And the look on the African woman’s face when she was watching the white ladies pet her “friend” …
    • 2017, Anysia Marcell Kiel, Discovering the Healer Within: Use Chakras & Intuition to Clear Negativity & Release Pain, Llewellyn Worldwide (→ISBN):
      A couple of weeks later, I contacted Melissa to get a blowout for my hair because I was going to New York for an interview but I had to be in the city early in the morning. Melissa said I could come to her condo the night before the event.
    • 2019, Susan Hyatt, Bare: A 7-Week Program to Transform Your Body, Get More Energy, Feel Amazing, and Become the Bravest, Most Unstoppable Version of You, BenBella Books (→ISBN):
      Go to your local salon and get a blowout. Or put a blue streak in your hair. Or if you’re commitment-phobic, get a temporary blue extension braided into your hair.

Derived terms

See also

  • blow out

Anagrams

  • bowl out, bowl-out, outblow, outbowl


English

Alternative forms

  • walk-away

Etymology

walk +‎ away

Noun

walkaway (plural walkaways)

  1. An easy victory; a walkover.

Related terms

  • walk away

Translations

See also

  • walk-off

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