bludgeon vs club what difference

what is difference between bludgeon and club

English

Etymology

First attested in 1730. Origin uncertain, perhaps of Cornish origin (recorded as blogon c. 1450) or from Middle French bougeon, a diminutive of bouge (club, stick).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /blʌdʒ.ən/
  • Rhymes: -ʌdʒən

Noun

bludgeon (plural bludgeons)

  1. A short, heavy club, often of wood, which is thicker or loaded at one end.
    We smashed the radio with a steel bludgeon.

Translations

See also

  • truncheon

Verb

bludgeon (third-person singular simple present bludgeons, present participle bludgeoning, simple past and past participle bludgeoned)

  1. (transitive) To strike or hit with something hard, usually on the head; to club.
  2. (transitive) To coerce someone, as if with a bludgeon.
    Their favorite method was bludgeoning us with the same old arguments in favor of their opinions.

Synonyms

  • (to club): cudgel
  • (coerce): harass, pummel

Derived terms

  • bludgeoner

Related terms

  • clobber
  • beat

Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “bludgeon”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.


English

Etymology

From Middle English clubbe, from Old Norse klubba, klumba (cudgel), from Proto-Germanic *klumpô (clip, clasp; clump, lump; log, block), from Proto-Indo-European *glemb- (log, block), from *gel- (to ball up, conglomerate, amass). Cognate with English clump, cloud, Latin globus, glomus; and perhaps related to Middle Low German kolve (bulb), German Kolben (butt, bulb, club).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: klŭb, IPA(key): /klʌb/
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Noun

club (plural clubs)

  1. An association of members joining together for some common purpose, especially sports or recreation.
    • At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors. [] In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
    1. (archaic) The fees associated with belonging to such a club.
      • 1783, Benjamin Franklin:[1]
        He can have no right to the benefits of Society, who will not pay his Club towards the Support of it.
  2. A heavy stick intended for use as a weapon or plaything.
    1. An implement to hit the ball in certain ball games, such as golf.
  3. A joint charge of expense, or any person’s share of it; a contribution to a common fund.
    • 17 Mat 1660, Samuel Pepys, diary
      first we went and dined at a French house , but paid 10s for our part of the club
  4. An establishment that provides staged entertainment, often with food and drink, such as a nightclub.
  5. A black clover shape (♣), one of the four symbols used to mark the suits of playing cards.
    1. A playing card marked with such a symbol.
  6. (humorous) Any set of people with a shared characteristic.
  7. A club sandwich.
    • 2004, Joanne M. Anderson, Small-town Restaurants in Virginia (page 123)
      Crab cake sandwiches, tuna melts, chicken clubs, salmon cakes, and prime-rib sandwiches are usually on the menu.
  8. The slice of bread in the middle of a club sandwich.

Synonyms

  • (association of members): confraternity
  • (weapon): cudgel
  • (sports association): team

Hyponyms

  • sports club

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Tokelauan: kalapu

Translations

Verb

club (third-person singular simple present clubs, present participle clubbing, simple past and past participle clubbed)

  1. (transitive) To hit with a club.
    He clubbed the poor dog.
  2. (intransitive) To join together to form a group.
    • Till grosser atoms, tumbling in the stream / Of fancy, madly met, and clubb’d into a dream.
  3. (intransitive, transitive) To combine into a club-shaped mass.
    a medical condition with clubbing of the fingers and toes
  4. (intransitive) To go to nightclubs.
    We went clubbing in Ibiza.
    When I was younger, I used to go clubbing almost every night.
  5. (intransitive) To pay an equal or proportionate share of a common charge or expense.
    • 1730, Jonathan Swift, Death and Daphne
      The owl, the raven, and the bat / Clubb’d for a feather to his hat.
  6. (transitive) To raise, or defray, by a proportional assessment.
    to club the expense
  7. (nautical) To drift in a current with an anchor out.
  8. (military) To throw, or allow to fall, into confusion.
  9. (transitive) To unite, or contribute, for the accomplishment of a common end.
    to club exertions
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      For instance, let us suppose that Homer and Virgil, Aristotle and Cicero, Thucydides and Livy, could have met all together, and have clubbed their several talents to have composed a treatise on the art of dancing: I believe it will be readily agreed they could not have equalled the excellent treatise which Mr Essex hath given us on that subject, entitled, The Rudiments of Genteel Education.
  10. (transitive, military) To turn the breech of (a musket) uppermost, so as to use it as a club.

Derived terms

  • clubbing
  • go clubbing

Translations


Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from English club.

Noun

club m (plural clubs)

  1. club (association)
  2. (golf) club

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English club.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /klʏp/
  • Hyphenation: club
  • Rhymes: -ʏp

Noun

club m (plural clubs, diminutive clubje n)

  1. club, association
  2. (golf) club

Derived terms

  • clubhuis
  • damclub
  • golfclub
  • handbalclub
  • schaakclub
  • skiclub
  • stamclub
  • tennisclub
  • voetbalclub

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English club.

Pronunciation

  • (France) IPA(key): /klœb/, /klyb/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): /klʏb/

Noun

club m (plural clubs)

  1. club (association)
  2. (golf) club

Synonyms

  • (golf club): bâton (Quebec)

Derived terms

  • bienvenue au club
  • soda club

Further reading

  • “club” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English club.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈklab/, /ˈklɛb/, /ˈklub/, /ˈkløb/

Noun

club m (invariable)

  1. club (association)
  2. club (golf implement)

References


Middle English

Noun

club

  1. Alternative form of clubbe

Romanian

Etymology

From French club.

Noun

club n (plural cluburi)

  1. club

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English club.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈklub/, [ˈkluβ̞]

Noun

club m (plural clubs or clubes)

  1. club (association)
    Synonyms: asociación, cofradía, gremio

Derived terms

  • club de fans
  • club nocturno

Further reading

  • “club” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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