blur vs dim what difference

what is difference between blur and dim

English

Etymology

From earlier blurre, probably an alteration of blear, from Middle English bleren, from Old English blerian. Compare Scots blore, bloar (to blur, cover with blots). More at blear.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blɜ(ɹ)/

Verb

blur (third-person singular simple present blurs, present participle blurring, simple past and past participle blurred)

  1. To make indistinct or hazy, to obscure or dim.
  2. To smear, stain or smudge.
  3. (intransitive) To become indistinct.
  4. To cause imperfection of vision in; to dim; to darken.
    • 1819, Joseph Rodman Drake, The Culprit Fay
      His eyes are blurred with the lightning’s glare.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To sully; to stain; to blemish, as reputation.
    • Sarcasms may eclipse thine own, / But cannot blur my lost renown.
  6. (graphical user interface, transitive) To transfer the input focus away from.
    • 2003, John Pollock, JavaScript: A Beginner’s Guide, Second Edition (page 175)
      Then give this box focus to blur the first one: []
    • 2001, Martin Webb, Michel Plungjan, Keith Drakard, Instant JavaScript (page 678)
      These form elements need to have an onFocus event handler to blur the current focus.

Synonyms

  • (make indistinct or hazy): pixelate, smooth
  • (move input focus from): unfocus

Antonyms

  • sharpen

Translations

Noun

blur (plural blurs)

  1. A smear, smudge or blot
  2. Something that appears hazy or indistinct
  3. (obsolete) A moral stain or blot.
    • 1548, Nicolas Udall, The first tome or volume of the Paraphrase of Erasmus vpon the newe testamente:
      [] with her raillyng sette a great blurre on myne honesty

Derived terms

  • motion blur

Translations

Adjective

blur (comparative more blur, superlative most blur)

  1. (Malaysia, Singapore, informal) In a state of doubt or confusion.

Anagrams

  • Burl, burl


Translingual

Symbol

dim

  1. (mathematics) dimension

English

Etymology

From Middle English dim, dym, from Old English dim, dimm (dim, dark, gloomy; wretched, grievous, sad, unhappy), from Proto-Germanic *dimmaz (dark), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰem- (to whisk, smoke, blow; dust, haze, cloud; obscure). Compare Faroese dimmur, Icelandic dimmur (dark) and dimma (darkness).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: dĭm, IPA(key): /dɪm/
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Adjective

dim (comparative dimmer, superlative dimmest)

  1. Not bright or colorful.
    The lighting was too dim for me to make out his facial features.
    • 1821, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Adonais
      that sustaining Love / Which, through the web of being blindly wove / By man and beast and earth and air and sea, / Burns bright or dim
  2. (colloquial) Not smart or intelligent.
    He may be a bit dim, but he’s not stupid.
  3. Indistinct, hazy or unclear.
    His vision grew dimmer as he aged.
  4. Disapproving, unfavorable: rarely used outside the phrase take a dim view of.
  5. (music) Clipping of diminished.

Translations

Noun

dim (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Dimness.

Verb

dim (third-person singular simple present dims, present participle dimming, simple past and past participle dimmed)

  1. (transitive) To make something less bright.
    He dimmed the lights and put on soft music.
  2. (intransitive) To become darker.
    The lights dimmed briefly when the air conditioning was turned on.
  3. To render dim, obscure, or dark; to make less bright or distinct
    • a king among his courtiers, [] who out to dim the lustre of all his attendants
    • 1791, William Cowper, The Odyssey of Homer
      Now set the sun, and twilight dimm’d the ways.
  4. To deprive of distinct vision; to hinder from seeing clearly, either by dazzling or clouding the eyes; to darken the senses or understanding of.
    • 1740, Christopher Pitt, The Aeneid
      Her starry eyes were dimm’d with streaming tears.

Derived terms

  • bedim
  • dimly
  • dimmer (noun)

Translations

Anagrams

  • DMI, IDM, IM’d, IMD, MDI, MID, Mid., mid, mid-

Indonesian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈdɪm]
  • Hyphenation: dim

Etymology 1

From Dutch duim.

Noun

dim (first-person possessive dimku, second-person possessive dimmu, third-person possessive dimnya)

  1. thumb
  2. inch
    Synonym: inci

Etymology 2

From English dimmer.

Noun

dim (first-person possessive dimku, second-person possessive dimmu, third-person possessive dimnya)

  1. high-beam headlamp on a road vehicle.

Further reading

  • “dim” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Latvian

Verb

dim

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of dimēt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of dimēt
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of dimēt
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of dimēt

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse dimmr. Related to English dim and Icelandic dimmur.

Adjective

dim (neuter singular dimt, definite singular and plural dimme, comparative dimmere, indefinite superlative dimmest, definite superlative dimmeste)

  1. dim
  2. to have bad vision
    Han er dim på synet

    His vision is dim/bad/poor

References

  • “dim” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From the Old Norse adjective dimmr, from Proto-Germanic *dimmaz. The neuter noun is derived from the adjective. The automotive senses may be a Back-formation from of the verb dimme.

Adjective

dim (neuter singular dimt, definite singular and plural dimme, comparative dimmare, indefinite superlative dimmast, definite superlative dimmaste)

  1. gloomy
  2. dim
  3. having bad vision
    Han er dim på synet

    His vision is dim/bad/poor
Related terms
  • dimma, dimme (verb)

Noun 1

dim m (definite singular dimmen, indefinite plural dimmar, definite plural dimmane)

  1. (automotive, colloquial) a switching of one’s headlamps from high-beam to low-beam
  2. (automotive, colloquial) lever, button or other
  3. (dialectal) Clipping of dimme (twilight, half darkness).

Noun 2

dim n (definite singular dimmet, uncountable)

  1. (dialectal) dimmest, darkest part of the summer night
  2. (dialectal) twilight
    Synonym: skumring

Etymology 2

Noun

dim m (definite singular dimmen, indefinite plural dimmar, definite plural dimmane)

  1. (colloquial) Clipping of dimensjon.

References

  • “dim” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • mid-

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dymъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dîm/

Noun

dȉm m (Cyrillic spelling ди̏м)

  1. smoke

Declension

Derived terms

  • dimni signal

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dymъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dím/

Noun

dȉm m inan

  1. smoke

Inflection

Further reading

  • dim”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Sumerian

Romanization

dim

  1. Romanization of ???? (dim)

Welsh

Etymology

From Middle Welsh dim. Cognate with the rare Old Irish dim (something, anything), which may be a Brythonic loanword. Further etymology uncertain. Matasović takes it from Proto-Celtic *dis-smi-, dissimilated from Proto-Indo-European *dus-smi- (literally bad one). Morris Jones hypothesizes the original meaning was share, portion and derives it from Proto-Celtic *dīsman, from Proto-Indo-European *deh₂y- (to share).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪm/

Adjective

dim

  1. any
  2. no, not, none

Noun

dim m (uncountable)

  1. anything
  2. nothing, none, nil, zero

Particle

dim

  1. not

Usage notes

As a verbal particle, almost always appears mutated as ddim.

Mutation

Further reading

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), chapter DIM, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

References


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