blur vs obscure what difference

what is difference between blur and obscure

English

Etymology

From earlier blurre, probably an alteration of blear, from Middle English bleren, from Old English blerian. Compare Scots blore, bloar (to blur, cover with blots). More at blear.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blɜ(ɹ)/

Verb

blur (third-person singular simple present blurs, present participle blurring, simple past and past participle blurred)

  1. To make indistinct or hazy, to obscure or dim.
  2. To smear, stain or smudge.
  3. (intransitive) To become indistinct.
  4. To cause imperfection of vision in; to dim; to darken.
    • 1819, Joseph Rodman Drake, The Culprit Fay
      His eyes are blurred with the lightning’s glare.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To sully; to stain; to blemish, as reputation.
    • Sarcasms may eclipse thine own, / But cannot blur my lost renown.
  6. (graphical user interface, transitive) To transfer the input focus away from.
    • 2003, John Pollock, JavaScript: A Beginner’s Guide, Second Edition (page 175)
      Then give this box focus to blur the first one: []
    • 2001, Martin Webb, Michel Plungjan, Keith Drakard, Instant JavaScript (page 678)
      These form elements need to have an onFocus event handler to blur the current focus.

Synonyms

  • (make indistinct or hazy): pixelate, smooth
  • (move input focus from): unfocus

Antonyms

  • sharpen

Translations

Noun

blur (plural blurs)

  1. A smear, smudge or blot
  2. Something that appears hazy or indistinct
  3. (obsolete) A moral stain or blot.
    • 1548, Nicolas Udall, The first tome or volume of the Paraphrase of Erasmus vpon the newe testamente:
      [] with her raillyng sette a great blurre on myne honesty

Derived terms

  • motion blur

Translations

Adjective

blur (comparative more blur, superlative most blur)

  1. (Malaysia, Singapore, informal) In a state of doubt or confusion.

Anagrams

  • Burl, burl


English

Etymology

From Middle English obscure, from Old French obscur, from Latin obscūrus (dark, dusky, indistinct), from ob- +‎ *scūrus, from Proto-Italic *skoiros, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ḱeh₃-. Doublet of oscuro.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /əbˈskjʊə(ɹ)/, /əbˈskjɔː(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /əbˈskjʊɹ/, /əbˈskjɝ/
  • Rhymes: -ʊə(ɹ), -ɔː(ɹ), -ɜː(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: ob‧scure

Adjective

obscure (comparative obscurer or more obscure, superlative obscurest or most obscure)

  1. Dark, faint or indistinct.
    • 1892, Denton Jaques Snider, Inferno, 1, 1-2 (originally by Dante Alighieri)
      I found myself in an obscure wood.
    • His lamp shall be put out in obscure darkness.
  2. Hidden, out of sight or inconspicuous.
    • 1606, John Davies of Hereford, Bien Venu
      the obscure corners of the earth
  3. Difficult to understand.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      The lock was of a kind that Watt could not pick. Watt could pick simple locks, but he could not pick obscure locks.
  4. Not well-known.
  5. Unknown or uncertain; unclear.
    The etymological roots of the word “blizzard” are obscure and open to debate.

Usage notes

  • The comparative obscurer and superlative obscurest, though formed by valid rules for English, are less common than more obscure and most obscure.

Synonyms

  • (dark): cimmerian, dingy; See also Thesaurus:dark
  • (faint or indistinct): fuzzy, ill-defined; See also Thesaurus:indistinct
  • (hidden, out of sight): occluded, secluded; See also Thesaurus:hidden
  • (difficult to understand): fathomless, inscrutable; See also Thesaurus:incomprehensible
  • (not well-known): enigmatic, esoteric, mysterious; See also Thesaurus:arcane

Antonyms

  • clear

Derived terms

  • obscurable
  • unobscurable
  • obscureness

Related terms

  • obscurity
  • obscuration

Translations

Verb

obscure (third-person singular simple present obscures, present participle obscuring, simple past and past participle obscured)

  1. (transitive) To render obscure; to darken; to make dim; to keep in the dark; to hide; to make less visible, intelligible, legible, glorious, beautiful, or illustrious.
    • c. 1688′, William Wake, Preparation for Death
      There is scarce any duty which has been so obscured in the writings of learned men as this.
  2. (transitive) To hide, put out of sight etc.
    • 1994, Bill Watterson, Homicidal Psycho Jungle Cat, page 62
      I realized that the purpose of writing is to inflate weak ideas, obscure poor reasoning, and inhibit clarity.
  3. (intransitive, obsolete) To conceal oneself; to hide.
    • How! There’s bad news. / I must obscure, and hear it.

Synonyms

  • (to render obscure; to darken; dim): becloud, bedarken, bedim, bemist

Translations

Further reading

  • obscure in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • obscure in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Cuberos

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔp.skyʁ/

Adjective

obscure

  1. feminine singular of obscur

Anagrams

  • courbes

Latin

Adjective

obscūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of obscūrus

References

  • obscure in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • obscure in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • obscure in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

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