bobble vs bungle what difference

what is difference between bobble and bungle

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɒbəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɒbəl
  • Homophone: bauble (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Noun

bobble (plural bobbles)

  1. A furry ball attached on top of a hat.
  2. (Britain) Elasticated band used for securing hair (for instance in a ponytail), a hair tie
  3. (informal) A pill (a ball formed on the surface of the fabric, as on laundered clothes).
  4. (knitting) A localized set of stitches forming a raised bump.
    • 2008, Claire Compton, Sue Whiting, The Knitting and Crochet Bible (page 45)
      From the top the sample shows four stitch popcorns, five stitch bobbles, two rows of bells and a central leaf with leaves sloping to the left and right each side.
  5. A wobbling motion.

Derived terms

  • bobble hat
  • bobblehead
  • bobbly
  • head bobble

Translations

Verb

bobble (third-person singular simple present bobbles, present participle bobbling, simple past and past participle bobbled)

  1. (intransitive) To bob up and down.
  2. (US) To make a mistake in.
  3. (intransitive) To roll slowly.
    • November 17 2012, BBC Sport: Arsenal 5-2 Tottenham [1]
      A neat interchange between Mikel Arteta and Wilshere set up Podolski and his finish bobbled into the net via Gallas.

Derived terms

  • bobbler

Translations



English

Etymology

From Old Norse, akin to Swedish dialect bangla (to work ineffectually), from Old Swedish bunga (to strike). Compare German Bengel (cudgel; rude fellow), Middle High German bungen (to hammer).

The noun derives from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌŋ.ɡ(ə)l/
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋɡəl

Verb

bungle (third-person singular simple present bungles, present participle bungling, simple past and past participle bungled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To botch up, bumble or incompetently perform a task; to make or mend clumsily; to manage awkwardly.
    • 1821, February 25th, Byron, quoted from Letters and Journals of Lord Byron:
      I always had an idea that it would be bungled; but was willing to hope, and am still so. Whatever I can do by money, means, or person, I will venture freely for their freedom; []
    • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, Chapter 49:
      His hand shakes, he is nervous, and it falls off. “Would any one believe this?” says he, catching it as it drops and looking round. “I am so out of sorts that I bungle at an easy job like this!”
    • 2014, Paul Doyle, “Southampton hammer eight past hapless Sunderland in barmy encounter”, The Guardian, 18 October 2014:
      There was a whiff of farce about Southampton’s second goal too, as, six minutes later, a bungled Sunderland pass ricocheted off Will Buckley’s backside to the feet of Dusan Tadic.

Synonyms

See Thesaurus:spoil

Derived terms

  • bungler
  • bungling
  • bunglesome

Translations

Noun

bungle (plural bungles)

  1. A botched or incompetently handled situation.
    • 1888, Henry Lawson, United Division:
      The Soudan bungle was born partly of sentimental loyalty and partly of the aforementioned jealousy existing between the colonies, and now at a time when the colonies should club closer together our Government is doing all they can to widen the breach by trying to pass a bill enabling New South Wales to monopolise the name “Australia”.

Anagrams

  • blunge

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