bobble vs spoil what difference

what is difference between bobble and spoil

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɒbəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɒbəl
  • Homophone: bauble (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Noun

bobble (plural bobbles)

  1. A furry ball attached on top of a hat.
  2. (Britain) Elasticated band used for securing hair (for instance in a ponytail), a hair tie
  3. (informal) A pill (a ball formed on the surface of the fabric, as on laundered clothes).
  4. (knitting) A localized set of stitches forming a raised bump.
    • 2008, Claire Compton, Sue Whiting, The Knitting and Crochet Bible (page 45)
      From the top the sample shows four stitch popcorns, five stitch bobbles, two rows of bells and a central leaf with leaves sloping to the left and right each side.
  5. A wobbling motion.

Derived terms

  • bobble hat
  • bobblehead
  • bobbly
  • head bobble

Translations

Verb

bobble (third-person singular simple present bobbles, present participle bobbling, simple past and past participle bobbled)

  1. (intransitive) To bob up and down.
  2. (US) To make a mistake in.
  3. (intransitive) To roll slowly.
    • November 17 2012, BBC Sport: Arsenal 5-2 Tottenham [1]
      A neat interchange between Mikel Arteta and Wilshere set up Podolski and his finish bobbled into the net via Gallas.

Derived terms

  • bobbler

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English spoilen, spuylen, borrowed from Old French espoillier, espollier, espuler, from Latin spoliāre, present active infinitive of spoliō (pillage, ruin, spoil).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: spoil, IPA(key): /spɔɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪl

Verb

spoil (third-person singular simple present spoils, present participle spoiling, simple past and past participle spoiled or spoilt)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To strip (someone who has been killed or defeated) of their arms or armour. [from 14th c.]
  2. (transitive, archaic) To strip or deprive (someone) of their possessions; to rob, despoil. [from 14th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts 9:21:
      All that herde hym wer amased and sayde: ys nott this he that spoylled them whych called on this name in Jerusalem?
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VII:
      To do her dye (quoth Vna) were despight, / And shame t’auenge so weake an enimy; / But spoile her of her scarlot robe, and let her fly.
  3. (transitive, intransitive, archaic) To plunder, pillage (a city, country etc.). [from 14th c.]
    • Outlaws, which, lurking in woods, used to break forth to rob and spoil.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To carry off (goods) by force; to steal. [14th-19th c.]
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Mark 3.27,[1]
      No man can enter into a strong man’s house, and spoil his goods, except he will first bind the strong man.
    • 1677, Hannah Woolley, The Compleat Servant-Maid, London: T. Passinger, p. 35,[2]
      They must likewise endeavour to be careful in looking after the rest of the Servants, that every one perform their duty in their several places, that they keep good hours in their up-rising and lying down, and that no Goods be either spoiled or embezelled.
    • 1814, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, Chapter 38,[3]
      [] it was her own knife; little sister Mary had left it to her upon her deathbed, and she ought to have had it to keep herself long ago. But mama kept it from her, and was always letting Betsey get hold of it; and the end of it would be that Betsey would spoil it, and get it for her own, though mama had promised her that Betsey should not have it in her own hands.
  5. (transitive) To ruin; to damage (something) in some way making it unfit for use. [from 16th c.]
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      Spiritual pride [] spoils so many graces.
    • “I don’t want to spoil any comparison you are going to make,” said Jim, “but I was at Winchester and New College.” ¶ “That will do,” said Mackenzie. “I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. […]”
    • 2011, ‘What the Arab papers say’, The Economist, 5 Aug 2011:
      ‘This is a great day for us. Let us not spoil it by saying the wrong thing, by promoting a culture of revenge, or by failing to treat the former president with respect.’
  6. (transitive) To ruin the character of, by overindulgence; to coddle or pamper to excess. [from 17th c.]
  7. (intransitive) Of food, to become bad, sour or rancid; to decay. [from 17th c.]
    Make sure you put the milk back in the fridge, otherwise it will spoil.
  8. (transitive) To render (a ballot paper) invalid by deliberately defacing it. [from 19th c.]
    • 2003, David Nicoll, The Guardian, letter:
      Dr Jonathan Grant (Letters, April 22) feels the best way to show his disaffection with political parties over Iraq is to spoil his ballot paper.
  9. (transitive) To reveal the ending or major events of (a story etc.); to ruin (a surprise) by exposing it ahead of time.
  10. (aviation) To reduce the lift generated by an airplane or wing by deflecting air upwards, usually with a spoiler.

Synonyms

  • (ruin): damage, destroy, ruin
  • (coddle): coddle, pamper, indulge, mollycoddle

Related terms

  • despoil

Translations

Noun

spoil (plural spoils)

  1. (Also in plural: spoils) Plunder taken from an enemy or victim.
  2. (uncountable) Material (such as rock or earth) removed in the course of an excavation, or in mining or dredging. Tailings. Such material could be utilised somewhere else.

Synonyms

  • (plunder taken from an enemy or victim): See Thesaurus:booty
  • (material moved): gangue, slag, tailings

Derived terms

  • spoiler

Translations

See also

  • spoilage
  • spoils of war
  • spoilsport
  • spoilt
  • too many cooks spoil the broth

References

  • spoil at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • -polis, Polis, polis

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