bodkin vs poniard what difference

what is difference between bodkin and poniard

English

Alternative forms

  • bodikin, bodkine, botkin, boidken

Etymology

From Middle English boydekin (dagger), apparently from *boyde, *boide (of unknown [Celtic?] origin) + -kin. Cognate with Scots botkin, boitkin, boikin (bodkin).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɒdkɪn/

Noun

bodkin (plural bodkins)

  1. A small sharp pointed tool for making holes in cloth or leather.
  2. A blunt needle used for threading ribbon or cord through a hem or casing.
  3. A hairpin.
  4. A dagger.
    • 1932, D. H. Lawrence, The Ship of Death:
      And can a man his own quietus make / with a bare bodkin? / With daggers, bodkins, bullets, man can make / a bruise or break of exit for his life; / but is that a quietus, O tell me, is it quietus?
  5. A type of long thin arrowhead.
  6. (printing) A sharp tool, like an awl, formerly used for pressing down individual type characters letters from a column or page in making corrections.

Translations

Adverb

bodkin (not comparable)

  1. Closely wedged between two people.
    • 1853, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair: A Novel Without a Hero, Bradbury and Evans, 1853. page 343.
      He’s too big to travel bodkin between you and me.
    • 2018, Delphi Complete Works of R. S. Surtees (Illustrated)
      Moreover, Mr. Jorrocks insisted upon riding bodkin — a very awkward-sized bodkin he was — especially as he would have all three to sit back, so that the conversation might be general.

Further reading

  • bodkin on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Dobkin


English

Alternative forms

  • poignard, poinard, poynard, punierd

Etymology

Borrowed from French poignard, from poing (fist), from Old French, from Latin pūgnus (fist), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pewǵ-.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɒnjəd/, /ˈpɒnjɑːd/

Noun

poniard (plural poniards)

  1. (now chiefly historical) A dagger typically having a slender square or triangular blade. [from 16th c.]
    • c. 1601, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, V.1:
      The sir King ha’s wag’d with him six Barbary horses, / against the which he impon’d as I take it, sixe French / Rapiers and Poniards, with their assignes, as Girdle, / Hangers or so [].
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol. IV, ch. 101:
      One of the tragic authors, finding himself assaulted in the dark, had, by way of poinard, employed upon his adversary’s throat a knife which lay upon the table, for the convenience of cutting cheese [] .
    • 1824, James Hogg, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner:
      On this occasion I said nothing, but concealing his poniard in my clothes, I hasted up the mountain, determined to execute my purpose […].

Translations

Verb

poniard (third-person singular simple present poniards, present participle poniarding, simple past and past participle poniarded)

  1. To stab with a poniard.
    • 1764, Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto, I:
      Manfred […] would have poignarded the peasant in their arms.

Related terms

  • impugn
  • pugilism
  • pugnacious
  • repugn (repugnant)

References

  • “poniard”, in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th edition, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 2000, →ISBN.
  • “poniard” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • “poniard” in WordNet 2.0, Princeton University, 2003.

Anagrams

  • padroni, pandori, paridon, poinard

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