bole vs trunk what difference

what is difference between bole and trunk

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /boʊl/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bəʊl/, /bɒʊl/
  • Rhymes: -əʊl
  • Homophone: bowl

Etymology 1

From Middle English bole, from Old Norse bolr, akin to Danish bul and German Bohle (plank). See also bulwark (defensive wall).

Noun

bole (plural boles)

  1. The trunk or stem of a tree.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, A Dream of Fair Women, in Poems, Volume 1, page 188,
      Enormous elm-tree boles did stoop and lean / Upon the dusky brushwood underneath / Their broad curved branches, fledged with clearest green, / New from its silken sheath.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows
      A fine powder filled the air and caressed the cheek with a tingle in its touch, and the black boles of the trees showed up in a light that seemed to come from below.
Translations

Etymology 2

Ancient Greek βῶλος (bôlos, clod or lump of earth): compare French bol. Doublet of bolus.

Noun

bole (plural boles)

  1. Any of several varieties of friable earthy clay, usually coloured red by iron oxide, and composed essentially of hydrous silicates of alumina, or more rarely of magnesia.
  2. (colour) The shade of reddish brown which resembles this clay.
  3. (obsolete) A bolus; a dose.
    • 1649, Jeremy Taylor, An Apology for Authorized and Set Forms of Liturgy Against the Pretence of the Spirit, 1849, Charles Page Eden (editor), The Whole Works of the Right Rev. Jeremy Taylor, D.D., Volume V, page 294,
      [] or else [] the churches were very incurious to swallow such a bole, if no pretension could have been reasonably made for their justification.

Etymology 3

Noun

bole (plural boles)

  1. Alternative form of boll (old unit of measure).

Etymology 4

Noun

bole (plural boles)

  1. (Scotland) An aperture with a shutter in the wall of a house, to admit air or light.
    • 1816, Walter Scott, The Antiquary, 1862, Adam and Charles Black, page 220,
      “Open the bole,” said the old woman firmly and hastily to her daughter-in-law, “open the bole wi’ speed, that I may see if this be the right Lord Geraldin [] .
  2. (Scotland) A small closet.

Anagrams

  • Belo, Lebo, Loeb, lobe

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • bolle

Etymology

Variant of bolle. Occurs exclusively in the plural form.

Noun

bole ?

  1. testicles
Related terms
  • bile
  • ballë
  • mbjell
  • pjell

Buol

Etymology

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔɺ̢ɛ/

Noun

bole

  1. house

Czech

Alternative forms

  • boleje (verb)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbolɛ]
  • Rhymes: -olɛ
  • Hyphenation: bo‧le

Noun

bole

  1. vocative singular of bol

Verb

bole

  1. present masculine singular transgressive of bolet

Dama (Sierra Leone)

Etymology

Perhaps related to Vai [script needed] (boi, structure without walls) or Mende bolo (courthouse with high walls) (having the definite form bolei.

Noun

bole

  1. courthouse

References

  • Dalby, T. D. P. (1963), “The extinct language of Dama”, in Sierra Leone Language Review, volume 2, Freetown: Fourah Bay College, pages 50–54

Latvian

Etymology

From English bowl, probably via German Bowle. Alternative historical forms: bols. First attested use to mean a bowl for making punch – 1880. First attested use to refer to the beverage itself – 1886.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [būōle]

Noun

bole f (5th declension)

  1. (dated sense) a bowl for making punch
    Bowle: bole (punša un citu tādu dzērienu kauss) – Bowle (German): bole (a bowl for punch or similar drinks).
  2. punch (drink made of wine, diluted with juices, syrups and fruit, often with added cognac or rhum)
    zemeņu bole – strawberry punch
    boles traukspunch bowl

Declension

Synonyms

  • (punch): punšs

References


Lower Sorbian

Verb

bole

  1. Superseded spelling of bóle.

Middle English

Etymology 1

From a mixture of Old English bula, *bulla, and Old Norse boli, both from Proto-Germanic *bulô.

Alternative forms

  • bule, bul, bolle, boule, bool, boole

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbul(ə)/, /ˈbuːl(ə)/, /ˈbɔːl(ə)/

Noun

bole (plural boles or bolen)

  1. bull, steer, male cow
  2. (heraldry) A heraldic bull
  3. (astrology) Taurus (zodiac)
  4. (astronomy) Taurus (constellation)
Related terms
  • bullok
Descendants
  • English: bull
  • Scots: bul, bull
References
  • “bōle, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-03.

Etymology 2

From Old Norse bolr.

Alternative forms

  • boole, bol

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔːl/

Noun

bole (plural boles)

  1. trunk, bole
  2. tree
Descendants
  • English: bole
References
  • “bōle, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-03.

Serbo-Croatian

Participle

bole (Cyrillic spelling боле)

  1. feminine plural active past participle of bosti


English

Etymology

From Middle English tronke, trunke, borrowed from Old French tronc (alms box, tree trunk, headless body), from Latin truncus (a stock, lopped tree trunk), from truncus (cut off, maimed, mutilated). For the verb, compare French tronquer, and see truncate. Doublet of truncus and tronk.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /tɹʌŋk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /tɹʌŋk/, [t͡ʃɹʌŋk], [tɹʌŋk]
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋk

Noun

trunk (plural trunks)

  1. (heading, biological) Part of a body.
    1. The usually single, more or less upright part of a tree, between the roots and the branches: the tree trunk.
    2. The torso.
    3. The conspicuously extended, mobile, nose-like organ of an animal such as a sengi, a tapir or especially an elephant. The trunks of various kinds of animals might be adapted to probing and sniffing, as in the sengis, or be partly prehensile, as in the tapir, or be a versatile prehensile organ for manipulation, feeding, drinking and fighting as in the elephant.
  2. (heading) A container.
    1. A large suitcase, chest, or similar receptacle for carrying or storing personal possessions, usually with a hinged, often domed lid, and handles at each end, so that generally it takes two persons to carry a full trunk.
      • There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy. Mail bags, so I understand, are being put on board. Stewards, carrying cabin trunks, swarm in the corridors.
    2. A box or chest usually covered with leather, metal, or cloth, or sometimes made of leather, hide, or metal, for holding or transporting clothes or other goods.
    3. (US, Canada, automotive) The luggage storage compartment of a sedan/saloon style car; a boot
  3. (heading) A channel for flow of some kind.
    1. (US, telecommunications) A circuit between telephone switchboards or other switching equipment.
    2. A chute or conduit, or a watertight shaft connecting two or more decks.
    3. A long, large box, pipe, or conductor, made of plank or metal plates, for various uses, as for conveying air to a mine or to a furnace, water to a mill, grain to an elevator, etc.
    4. (archaic) A long tube through which pellets of clay, peas, etc., are driven by the force of the breath. A peashooter
      • He shot Sugar Plums at them out of a Trunk.
    5. (mining) A flume or sluice in which ores are separated from the slimes in which they are contained.
  4. (software engineering) In software projects under source control: the most current source tree, from which the latest unstable builds (so-called “trunk builds”) are compiled.
  5. The main line or body of anything.
    1. (transport) A main line in a river, canal, railroad, or highway system.
    2. (architecture) The part of a pilaster between the base and capital, corresponding to the shaft of a column.
  6. A large pipe forming the piston rod of a steam engine, of sufficient diameter to allow one end of the connecting rod to be attached to the crank, and the other end to pass within the pipe directly to the piston, thus making the engine more compact.
  7. (in the plural) Short for swimming trunks.

Synonyms

  • (luggage storage compartment of a sedan/saloon style car): boot (UK, Aus), dicky (India)
  • (upright part of a tree): tree trunk
  • (nose of an elephant): proboscis

Hyponyms

  • (a large suitcase; a chest for holding goods): footlocker

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • trunk in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • trunk in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Verb

trunk (third-person singular simple present trunks, present participle trunking, simple past and past participle trunked)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To lop off; to curtail; to truncate.
  2. (transitive, mining) To extract (ores) from the slimes in which they are contained, by means of a trunk.
  3. (telecommunications) To provide simultaneous network access to multiple clients by sharing a set of circuits, carriers, channels, or frequencies.

Anagrams

  • K-turn

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