bombard vs pelt what difference

what is difference between bombard and pelt

English

Pronunciation

  • Verb:
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌbɒmˈbɑːd/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˌbɑmˈbɑɹd/, /bəmˈbɑɹd/
  • Noun:
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbɒmˌbɑːd/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbɑmˌbɑɹd/

Etymology 1

From Middle English bombard, from Middle French bombarde (a bombard, mortar, catapult”; also “a bassoon-like musical instrument), from Latin bombus (buzzing; booming).

The modern pronunciation is from modern French bombarde.

Noun

bombard (plural bombards)

  1. a medieval primitive cannon, used chiefly in sieges for throwing heavy stone balls.
    • They planted in divers places twelve great bombards, wherewith they threw huge stones into the air, which, falling down into the city, might break down the houses.
  2. (obsolete) a bassoon-like medieval instrument
  3. (obsolete) a large liquor container made of leather, in the form of a jug or a bottle.
  4. (poetic, rare) A bombardment.
    • 1807, Joel Barlow, The Columbiad
      With mines and parallels contracts the space;
      Then bids the battering floats his labors crown
      And pour their bombard on the shuddering town
  5. (music) A bombardon.
Translations

Etymology 2

From French bombarder, from Middle French bombarde (a bombard)

Verb

bombard (third-person singular simple present bombards, present participle bombarding, simple past and past participle bombarded)

  1. To continuously attack something with bombs, artillery shells or other missiles or projectiles.
  2. (figuratively) To attack something or someone by directing objects at them.
  3. (figuratively) To continuously send or direct (at someone)
  4. (physics) To direct at a substance an intense stream of high-energy particles, usually sub-atomic or made of at most a few atoms.
Synonyms
  • bomb
Translations

Derived terms


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • bumbard

Etymology

From Middle French bombarde.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbumbard/

Noun

bombard (plural bombardes)

  1. (Late Middle English) cannon, bombard

Descendants

  • English: bombard
  • Scots: bombard

References

  • “bǒmbard, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English pelt, from Old French pelette, diminutive of pel (a skin), from Latin pellis. Alternatively a contraction of peltry (skins) from the same Old French and Latin roots.
Norwegian pels, Norwegian belte

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɛlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Noun

pelt (plural pelts)

  1. The skin of a beast with the hair on; a raw or undressed hide; a skin preserved with the hairy or woolly covering on it.
  2. The body of any quarry killed by a hawk.
  3. (humorous) Human skin.
    • A scabby tetter on their pelts will stick
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English pelten, pilten, pulten, perhaps from Old English *pyltan.

Verb

pelt (third-person singular simple present pelts, present participle pelting, simple past and past participle pelted)

  1. (transitive) To bombard, as with missiles.
    They pelted the attacking army with bullets.
  2. (transitive) To throw; to use as a missile.
    The children pelted apples at us.
  3. (intransitive) To rain or hail heavily.
    It’s pelting down out there!
  4. (transitive) To beat or hit, especially repeatedly.
  5. (intransitive) To move rapidly, especially in or on a conveyance.
    The boy pelted down the hill on his toboggan.
  6. (intransitive, obsolete) To throw out words.
Translations

Noun

pelt (plural pelts)

  1. A blow or stroke from something thrown.
    • 2013, Karen-Anne Stewart, Healing Rain (page 134)
      Kas is awakened by the furious pelts of rain hitting the tin roof, and he rolls over, pulling his sleeping wife tightly into his arms.

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “pelt”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • -lept, lept, lept-

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

pelt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of pellen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of pellen

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