bombastic vs large what difference

what is difference between bombastic and large

English

Alternative forms

  • bombastical (archaic)
  • bombastick (obsolete)
  • bumbastic, bumbastical (obsolete)

Etymology

18th century, from bombast (padding, stuffing).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɒmˈbæs.tɪk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bɑmˈbæs.tʰɪk/
  • Rhymes: -æstɪk

Adjective

bombastic (comparative more bombastic, superlative most bombastic)

  1. (of a person, their language or writing) showy in speech and given to using flowery or elaborate terms; grandiloquent; pompous
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:verbose, Thesaurus:arrogant
    Antonyms: see Thesaurus:concise
  2. High-sounding but with little meaning.
  3. (archaic) Inflated, overfilled.
    Synonyms: inflated, turgid

Related terms

Descendants

Translations


Romanian

Etymology

From German bombastisch

Adjective

bombastic m or n (feminine singular bombastică, masculine plural bombastici, feminine and neuter plural bombastice)

  1. bombastic

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle English large, from Old French large, from Latin larga, feminine of largus (abundant, plentiful, copious, large, much). Mostly displaced Middle English stoor, stour (large, great) (from Old English stōr) and muchel (large, great) (from Old English myċel).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈlɑːd͡ʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈlɑɹd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)dʒ

Adjective

large (comparative larger, superlative largest)

  1. Of considerable or relatively great size or extent.
  2. (obsolete) Abundant; ample.
  3. (archaic) Full in statement; diffuse; profuse.
    • 1711, Henry Felton, Dissertation on Reading the Classics
      I might be very large upon the importance and advantages of education.
  4. (obsolete) Free; unencumbered.
    • Of burdens all he set the Paynims large.
  5. (obsolete) Unrestrained by decorum; said of language.
  6. (nautical) Crossing the line of a ship’s course in a favorable direction; said of the wind when it is abeam, or between the beam and the quarter.

Synonyms

  • big, huge, giant, gigantic, enormous, stour, great, mickle, largeish
  • See also Thesaurus:large

Antonyms

  • small, tiny, minuscule

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

large (countable and uncountable, plural larges)

  1. (music, obsolete) An old musical note, equal to two longas, four breves, or eight semibreves.
  2. (obsolete) Liberality, generosity.
  3. (slang, plural: large) A thousand dollars/pounds.
    Getting a car tricked out like that will cost you 50 large.
  4. A large serving of something.
    One small coffee and two larges, please.

Derived terms

  • at large

Adverb

large

  1. (nautical) Before the wind.

Further reading

  • large in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • large in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Agler, Alger, Elgar, Ragle, ergal, glare, lager, regal

French

Etymology

From Old French large, from Latin largus, larga, largum (abundant, plentiful, copious, large, much). The feminine is inherited, but for the masculine, Latin largum (the masculine and neuter accusative) developed into Old French larc, which was discarded.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /laʁʒ/
  • (Paris)
  • Homophone: larges
  • Hyphenation: large

Adjective

large (plural larges)

  1. wide, broad
  2. large
  3. generous

Derived terms

  • de long en large
  • en long en large
  • large d’esprit
  • ratisser large

Related terms

  • largesse

Noun

large m (plural larges)

  1. open sea
  2. width

Synonyms

  • (open sea): haute mer
  • (width): largeur
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Antillean Creole: laj
  • Haitian Creole: laj
  • Karipúna Creole French: laj
  • Louisiana Creole French: laj, larj

Anagrams

  • Alger, grêla, régal, régla

Further reading

  • “large” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Etymology 1

Adverb

largē (comparative largius, superlative largissimē)

  1. munificently, generously, liberally.
  2. abundantly, copiously.
  3. to a great extent.

Etymology 2

Adjective

large

  1. vocative masculine singular of largus

References

  • large in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • large in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Norman

Etymology

From Old French large, from Latin largus (abundant, plentiful, copious, large, much).

Adjective

large m or f

  1. (Jersey) wide

Derived terms

Noun

large m (plural larges)

  1. (Jersey, nautical) open sea, deep sea
    Synonym: plieine mé

Old French

Alternative forms

  • larc (Roman de Renard, “wide”)

Etymology

From Latin largus, larga.

Adjective

large m (oblique and nominative feminine singular large)

  1. generous
  2. large; big
  3. wide (when used to differentiate between height, width and length)

Descendants

  • Middle English: large
    • English: large
  • Middle French: large
    • French: large
      • Antillean Creole: laj
      • Haitian Creole: laj
      • Karipúna Creole French: laj
      • Louisiana Creole French: laj, larj
  • Norman: large (Guernsey, Jersey)

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (large, supplement)
  • large on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial