bond vs shackle what difference

what is difference between bond and shackle

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɑnd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɒnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English bond, a variant of band, from Old English beand, bænd, bend (bond, chain, fetter, band, ribbon, ornament, chaplet, crown), from Proto-Germanic *bandaz, *bandiz (band, fetter). Cognate with Dutch band, German Band, Swedish band. Doublet of Bund. Related to bind.

Noun

bond (plural bonds)

  1. (law) Evidence of a long-term debt, by which the bond issuer (the borrower) is obliged to pay interest when due, and repay the principal at maturity, as specified on the face of the bond certificate. The rights of the holder are specified in the bond indenture, which contains the legal terms and conditions under which the bond was issued. Bonds are available in two forms: registered bonds, and bearer bonds.
  2. (finance) A documentary obligation to pay a sum or to perform a contract; a debenture.
  3. A partial payment made to show a provider that the customer is sincere about buying a product or a service. If the product or service is not purchased the customer then forfeits the bond.
  4. (often in the plural) A physical connection which binds, a band.
  5. An emotional link, connection or union; that which holds two or more people together, as in a friendship; a tie.
    • 1792, Edmund Burke, a letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe on the subject of the Roman Catholics of Ireland
      a people with whom I have no tie but the common bond of mankind.
  6. Moral or political duty or obligation.
  7. (chemistry) A link or force between neighbouring atoms in a molecule.
  8. A binding agreement, a covenant.
  9. A bail bond.
  10. Any constraining or cementing force or material.
  11. (construction) In building, a specific pattern of bricklaying.
  12. In Scotland, a mortgage.
  13. (railways) A heavy copper wire or rod connecting adjacent rails of an electric railway track when used as a part of the electric circuit.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bond (third-person singular simple present bonds, present participle bonding, simple past and past participle bonded)

  1. (transitive) To connect, secure or tie with a bond; to bind.
  2. (transitive) To cause to adhere (one material with another).
  3. (transitive, chemistry) To form a chemical compound with.
  4. (transitive) To guarantee or secure a financial risk.
  5. To form a friendship or emotional connection.
  6. (transitive) To put in a bonded warehouse; to secure (goods) until the associated duties are paid.
  7. (transitive, construction) To lay bricks in a specific pattern.
  8. (transitive, electricity) To make a reliable electrical connection between two conductors (or any pieces of metal that may potentially become conductors).
  9. To bail out by means of a bail bond.
    • 1877, Report No. 704 of proceedings In the Senate of the United States, 44th Congress, 2nd Session, page 642:
      In the August election of 1874 I bonded out of jail eighteen colored men that had been in there, and there has not one of them been tried yet, and they never will be.
    • 1995, Herman Beavers, Wrestling angels into song: the fictions of Ernest J. Gaines, page 28:
      In jail for killing a man, Procter Lewis is placed in a cell where he is faced with a choice: he can be bonded out of jail by Roger Medlow, the owner of the plantation where he lives, or he can serve his time in the penitentiary.
    • 2001, Elaine J. Lawless, Women escaping violence: empowerment through narrative, page xxi:
      And no, you cannot drive her down to the bank to see if her new AFDC card is activated and drop her kids off at school for her because she didn’t think to get her car before he bonded out of jail.

Synonyms

  • (to cause to adhere): cling, stick; see also Thesaurus:adhere
Derived terms
  • bondability
  • bondable
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bonde (peasant, servant, bondman), from Old English bōnda, būnda (householder, freeman, plebeian, husband), perhaps from Old Norse bóndi (husbandman, householder, literally dweller), or a contraction of Old English būend (dweller, inhabitant), both from Proto-Germanic *būwandz (dweller), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew- (to swell, grow). See also bower, boor.

Noun

bond (plural bonds)

  1. A peasant; churl.
  2. A vassal; serf; one held in bondage to a superior.

Adjective

bond (comparative more bond, superlative most bond)

  1. Subject to the tenure called bondage.
  2. In a state of servitude or slavedom; not free.
  3. Servile; slavish; pertaining to or befitting a slave.
Derived terms
  • Bond
  • bondage
  • bondfolk
  • bondland
  • bondly
  • bondmaid
  • bondman, bondsman
  • bondservant
  • bond-service
  • bond-slave
  • bond-tenant
  • bondwoman, bondswoman

Related terms

  • boor
  • bower

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔnt/
  • Hyphenation: bond
  • Rhymes: -ɔnt
  • Homophone: bont

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch bund. The word could also be neuter until the 19th century, when it became increasingly common under the influence of German Bund.

Noun

bond m (plural bonden, diminutive bondje n)

  1. society, fellowship
    Synonym: verbond
  2. union, association, guild
    vakbond – trade union
  3. coalition, alliance, league
    Volkenbond – League of Nations
  4. covenant, agreement
  5. (dated) bundle (set of objects packed or tied together)
Derived terms
  • bondsrepubliek
  • bondsstaat
  • Volkenbond
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: bond
  • Papiamentu: bònt

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

bond

  1. singular past indicative of binden

French

Etymology

From bondir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔ̃/
  • Homophones: bon, bons, bonds
  • Rhymes: -ɔ̃

Noun

bond m (plural bonds)

  1. jump, bound, leap
  2. bounce

Derived terms

  • faire faux bond
  • saisir la balle au bond

Further reading

  • “bond” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Noun

bond

  1. Alternative form of band


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃækəl/
  • Rhymes: -ækəl

Etymology 1

From Middle English schakkyl, schakle, from Old English sċeacel, sċeacul, sċacul (shackle, bond, fetter), from Proto-West Germanic *skakul, from Proto-Germanic *skakulaz (shackle), from Proto-Indo-European *skeg-, *skek- (to jump, move, shake, stir), equivalent to shake +‎ -le. Cognate with Dutch schakel (link, shackle, clasp), German Schäckel (shackle), Danish skagle (a carriage trace), Swedish skakel (the loose shaft of a carriage), Icelandic skökull (a carriage pole).

Noun

shackle (plural shackles)

  1. (usually in the plural) A restraint fit over a human or animal appendage, such as a wrist, ankle or finger; normally used in pairs joined by a chain.
    Synonym: hobble
    Hyponyms: handcuff, manacle, fetter
  2. A U-shaped piece of metal secured with a pin or bolt across the opening, or a hinged metal loop secured with a quick-release locking pin mechanism.
    Coordinate term: clevis
  3. (figuratively, usually in the plural) A restraint on one’s action, activity, or progress.
    • His very will seems to be in bonds and shackles.
  4. A fetter-like band worn as an ornament.
    • 1697, William Dampier, A New Voyage Round the World
      Most of the men and women [] had all earrings made of gold, and gold shackles about their legs and arms.
  5. A link for connecting railroad cars; a drawlink or draglink.
  6. A length of cable or chain equal to 12+12 fathoms or 75 feet, or later to 15 fathoms.
  7. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) Stubble.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Pegge to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • harp shackle
  • H-shackle
  • shackleless
Translations

Further reading

  • shackle on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English schakelen, schakkylen, from the noun (see above).

Verb

shackle (third-person singular simple present shackles, present participle shackling, simple past and past participle shackled)

  1. (transitive) To restrain using shackles; to place in shackles.
  2. (transitive, by extension) To render immobile or incapable; to inhibit the progress or abilities of.
Antonyms
  • (to restrain using shackles): unshackle, untie
  • (to inhibit the abilities of): free, liberate, unshackle
Translations

Etymology 3

From shack (shake) +‎ -le.

Verb

shackle (third-person singular simple present shackles, present participle shackling, simple past and past participle shackled)

  1. (dialectal) To shake, rattle.

Anagrams

  • Kachels, hackles

Scots

Etymology

From Old English sceacel, sceacul, scacul (shackle, bond, fetter), from Proto-Germanic *skakulaz (shackle), from Proto-Indo-European *skeg-, *skek- (to jump, move, shake, stir).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʃakl], [ʃekl]

Noun

shackle (plural shackles)

  1. shackle, fetter, manacle
  2. (anatomy) wrist

Derived terms

  • shackle-bane (wrist)

Verb

shackle (third-person singular present shackles, present participle shacklin, past shackelt, past participle shackelt)

  1. to shackle

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