bond vs stick what difference

what is difference between bond and stick

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɑnd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɒnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English bond, a variant of band, from Old English beand, bænd, bend (bond, chain, fetter, band, ribbon, ornament, chaplet, crown), from Proto-Germanic *bandaz, *bandiz (band, fetter). Cognate with Dutch band, German Band, Swedish band. Doublet of Bund. Related to bind.

Noun

bond (plural bonds)

  1. (law) Evidence of a long-term debt, by which the bond issuer (the borrower) is obliged to pay interest when due, and repay the principal at maturity, as specified on the face of the bond certificate. The rights of the holder are specified in the bond indenture, which contains the legal terms and conditions under which the bond was issued. Bonds are available in two forms: registered bonds, and bearer bonds.
  2. (finance) A documentary obligation to pay a sum or to perform a contract; a debenture.
  3. A partial payment made to show a provider that the customer is sincere about buying a product or a service. If the product or service is not purchased the customer then forfeits the bond.
  4. (often in the plural) A physical connection which binds, a band.
  5. An emotional link, connection or union; that which holds two or more people together, as in a friendship; a tie.
    • 1792, Edmund Burke, a letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe on the subject of the Roman Catholics of Ireland
      a people with whom I have no tie but the common bond of mankind.
  6. Moral or political duty or obligation.
  7. (chemistry) A link or force between neighbouring atoms in a molecule.
  8. A binding agreement, a covenant.
  9. A bail bond.
  10. Any constraining or cementing force or material.
  11. (construction) In building, a specific pattern of bricklaying.
  12. In Scotland, a mortgage.
  13. (railways) A heavy copper wire or rod connecting adjacent rails of an electric railway track when used as a part of the electric circuit.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bond (third-person singular simple present bonds, present participle bonding, simple past and past participle bonded)

  1. (transitive) To connect, secure or tie with a bond; to bind.
  2. (transitive) To cause to adhere (one material with another).
  3. (transitive, chemistry) To form a chemical compound with.
  4. (transitive) To guarantee or secure a financial risk.
  5. To form a friendship or emotional connection.
  6. (transitive) To put in a bonded warehouse; to secure (goods) until the associated duties are paid.
  7. (transitive, construction) To lay bricks in a specific pattern.
  8. (transitive, electricity) To make a reliable electrical connection between two conductors (or any pieces of metal that may potentially become conductors).
  9. To bail out by means of a bail bond.
    • 1877, Report No. 704 of proceedings In the Senate of the United States, 44th Congress, 2nd Session, page 642:
      In the August election of 1874 I bonded out of jail eighteen colored men that had been in there, and there has not one of them been tried yet, and they never will be.
    • 1995, Herman Beavers, Wrestling angels into song: the fictions of Ernest J. Gaines, page 28:
      In jail for killing a man, Procter Lewis is placed in a cell where he is faced with a choice: he can be bonded out of jail by Roger Medlow, the owner of the plantation where he lives, or he can serve his time in the penitentiary.
    • 2001, Elaine J. Lawless, Women escaping violence: empowerment through narrative, page xxi:
      And no, you cannot drive her down to the bank to see if her new AFDC card is activated and drop her kids off at school for her because she didn’t think to get her car before he bonded out of jail.

Synonyms

  • (to cause to adhere): cling, stick; see also Thesaurus:adhere
Derived terms
  • bondability
  • bondable
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bonde (peasant, servant, bondman), from Old English bōnda, būnda (householder, freeman, plebeian, husband), perhaps from Old Norse bóndi (husbandman, householder, literally dweller), or a contraction of Old English būend (dweller, inhabitant), both from Proto-Germanic *būwandz (dweller), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew- (to swell, grow). See also bower, boor.

Noun

bond (plural bonds)

  1. A peasant; churl.
  2. A vassal; serf; one held in bondage to a superior.

Adjective

bond (comparative more bond, superlative most bond)

  1. Subject to the tenure called bondage.
  2. In a state of servitude or slavedom; not free.
  3. Servile; slavish; pertaining to or befitting a slave.
Derived terms
  • Bond
  • bondage
  • bondfolk
  • bondland
  • bondly
  • bondmaid
  • bondman, bondsman
  • bondservant
  • bond-service
  • bond-slave
  • bond-tenant
  • bondwoman, bondswoman

Related terms

  • boor
  • bower

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔnt/
  • Hyphenation: bond
  • Rhymes: -ɔnt
  • Homophone: bont

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch bund. The word could also be neuter until the 19th century, when it became increasingly common under the influence of German Bund.

Noun

bond m (plural bonden, diminutive bondje n)

  1. society, fellowship
    Synonym: verbond
  2. union, association, guild
    vakbond – trade union
  3. coalition, alliance, league
    Volkenbond – League of Nations
  4. covenant, agreement
  5. (dated) bundle (set of objects packed or tied together)
Derived terms
  • bondsrepubliek
  • bondsstaat
  • Volkenbond
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: bond
  • Papiamentu: bònt

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

bond

  1. singular past indicative of binden

French

Etymology

From bondir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔ̃/
  • Homophones: bon, bons, bonds
  • Rhymes: -ɔ̃

Noun

bond m (plural bonds)

  1. jump, bound, leap
  2. bounce

Derived terms

  • faire faux bond
  • saisir la balle au bond

Further reading

  • “bond” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Noun

bond

  1. Alternative form of band


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: stĭk, IPA(key): /stɪk/
  • Homophone: stich
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Etymology 1

From Middle English stikke (stick, rod, twig), from Old English sticca (rod, twig), from Proto-Germanic *stikkô, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teyg- (to pierce, prick, be sharp). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Stikke (stick), West Flemish stik (stick).

Noun

stick (countable and uncountable, plural sticks)

  1. An elongated piece of wood or similar material, typically put to some use, for example as a wand or baton.
    1. A small, thin branch from a tree or bush; a twig; a branch.
      Synonyms: branch, twig, (dialectal) rice, kindling, (uncountable) brush
    2. A relatively long, thin piece of wood, of any size.
    3. (US) A timber board, especially a two by four (inches).
      Synonym: two by four
    4. A cane or walking stick (usually wooden, metal or plastic) to aid in walking.
      Synonyms: cane, walking stick
    5. A cudgel or truncheon (usually of wood, metal or plastic), especially one carried by police or guards.
    6. (carpentry) The vertical member of a cope-and-stick joint.
    7. (nautical) A mast or part of a mast of a ship; also, a yard.
    8. (figuratively) A piece (of furniture, especially if wooden).
      Synonyms: piece, item
  2. Any roughly cylindrical (or rectangular) unit of a substance.
    1. (chiefly Canada, US) A small rectangular block, with a length several times its width, which contains by volume one half of a cup of shortening (butter, margarine or lard).
    2. A standard rectangular strip of chewing gum.
    3. (slang) A cigarette (usually a tobacco cigarette, less often a marijuana cigarette).
      Synonyms: joint, reefer
  3. Material or objects attached to a stick or the like.
    1. A bunch of something wrapped around or attached to a stick.
    2. (archaic) A scroll that is rolled around (mounted on, attached to) a stick.
    3. (military) The structure to which a set of bombs in a bomber aircraft are attached and which drops the bombs when it is released. The bombs themselves and, by extension, any load of similar items dropped in quick succession such as paratroopers or containers.
      Synonym: train
  4. A tool, control, or instrument shaped somewhat like a stick.
    1. (US, colloquial) A manual transmission, a vehicle equipped with a manual transmission, so called because of the stick-like, i.e. twig-like, control (the gear shift) with which the driver of such a vehicle controls its transmission.
      Synonyms: stickshift, gearstick
      1. (US, colloquial, uncountable) Vehicles, collectively, equipped with manual transmissions.
    2. (aviation) The control column of an aircraft; a joystick. (By convention, a wheel-like control mechanism with a handgrip on opposite sides, similar to the steering wheel of an automobile, can also be called the “stick”, although “yoke” or “control wheel” is more commonly seen.)
    3. (aviation, uncountable) Use of the stick to control the aircraft.
    4. (computing) A memory stick.
    5. (slang) A handgun.
      • Dropkick Murphys, Johnny, I Hardly Knew Ya (song)
        A stick in the hand, a drop in the eye
    6. (dated, letterpress typography) A composing stick, the tool used by compositors to assemble lines of type.
    7. (jazz, slang) The clarinet.
      Synonyms: licorice stick, liquorice stick
  5. (sports) A stick-like item:
    1. (sports, generically) A long thin implement used to control a ball or puck in sports like hockey, polo, and lacrosse.
    2. (horse racing) The short whip carried by a jockey.
    3. (boardsports) A board as used in board sports, such as a surfboard, snowboard, or skateboard.
    4. (golf) The pole bearing a small flag that marks the hole.
      Synonyms: pin, flagstick
    5. (US, slang, uncountable) The cue used in billiards, pool, snooker, etc.
      1. The game of pool, or an individual pool game.
  6. (sports, uncountable) Ability; specifically:
    1. (golf) The long-range driving ability of a golf club.
    2. (baseball) The potential hitting power of a specific bat.
    3. (baseball) General hitting ability.
    4. (field hockey or ice hockey) The potential accuracy of a hockey stick, implicating also the player using it.
  7. (slang, dated) A person or group of people. (Perhaps, in some senses, because people are, broadly speaking, tall and thin, like pieces of wood.)
    1. A thin or wiry person; particularly a flat-chested woman.
    2. (magic) An assistant planted in the audience.
      Synonyms: plant, shill
    3. A stiff, stupidly obstinate person.
    4. (military aviation, from joystick) A fighter pilot.
    5. (military, South Africa) A small group of (infantry) soldiers.
  8. Encouragement or punishment, or (resulting) vigour or other improved behavior.
    1. A negative stimulus or a punishment. (This sense derives from the metaphor of using a stick, a long piece of wood, to poke or beat a beast of burden to compel it to move forward. Compare carrot.)
    2. (slang, uncountable) Corporal punishment; beatings.
    3. (slang) Vigor; spirit; effort, energy, intensity.
      = he threw himself into the task of digging
      = she berated him (this sense melts into the previous sense, “punishment”)
    4. (slang) Vigorous driving of a car; gas.
  9. A measure.
    1. (obsolete) An English Imperial unit of length equal to 2 inches.
    2. (archaic, rare) A quantity of eels, usually 25.
      Synonyms: stich, broach
Usage notes
  • (furniture): Generally used in the negative, or in contexts expressive of poverty or lack.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:stick
Derived terms

Note: Terms derived from the verb are found further below.

Translations

Verb

stick (third-person singular simple present sticks, present participle sticking, simple past and past participle sticked)

  1. (carpentry) To cut a piece of wood to be the stick member of a cope-and-stick joint.
  2. (transitive, printing, slang, dated) To compose; to set, or arrange, in a composing stick.
    to stick type
  3. (transitive) To furnish or set with sticks.

Etymology 2

From Middle English stiken (to stick, pierce, stab, remain embedded, be fastened), from Old English stician (to pierce, stab, remain embedded, be fastened), from Proto-Germanic *stikōną (to pierce, prick, be sharp) (compare also the related Proto-Germanic *stikaną, whence West Frisian stekke, Low German steken, Dutch steken, German stechen; compare also Danish stikke, Swedish sticka), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tig-, *(s)teyg- (to pierce, prick, be sharp).

Cognate with the first etymology (same PIE root, different paths through Germanic and Old English), to stitch, and to etiquette, via French étiquette – see there for further discussion.

Noun

stick (uncountable)

  1. (motor racing) The traction of tires on the road surface.
  2. (fishing) The amount of fishing line resting on the water surface before a cast; line stick.
  3. A thrust with a pointed instrument; a stab.

Verb

stick (third-person singular simple present sticks, present participle sticking, simple past and past participle stuck or (archaic) sticked)

  1. (intransitive) To become or remain attached; to adhere.
  2. (intransitive) To jam; to stop moving.
  3. (transitive) To tolerate, to endure, to stick with.
  4. (intransitive) To persist.
  5. (intransitive) Of snow, to remain frozen on landing.
  6. (intransitive) To remain loyal; to remain firm.
  7. (dated, intransitive) To hesitate, to be reluctant; to refuse (in negative phrases).
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 10,[2]
      For thou art so possess’d with murderous hate
      That ’gainst thyself thou stick’st not to conspire.
    • 1712, John Arbuthnot, Law is a Bottomless Pit, London: John Morphew, Chapter 1,[3]
      Some stick not to say, that the Parson and Attorney forg’d a Will, for which they were well Paid []
    • 1716, Thomas Browne, Christian Morals, 2nd edition edited by Samuel Johnson, London: J. Payne, 1756, Part I, p. 12,[4]
      Though a cup of cold water from some hand may not be without its reward, yet stick not thou for wine and oil for the wounds of the distressed []
    • 1740, James Blair, Our Saviour’s divine sermon on the mount […] explained, volume 3, page 26:
      And so careful were they to put off the Honour of great Actions from themselves, and to centre it upon God, that they stuck not sometimes to depreciate themselves that they might more effectually honour him.
    • 1742, Samuel Richardson, Pamela, Volume 3, Letter 37, p. 375,[5]
      For he that sticks not at one bad Action, will not scruple another to vindicate himself: And so, Devil-like, become the Tempter, and the Accuser too!
    • 1743, Thomas Stackhouse, A Compleat Body of Speculative and Practical Divinity, edition 3 (London), page 524:
      The First-fruits were a common Oblation to their Deities; but the chief Part of their Worship consisted in sacrificiing Animals : And this they did out of a real Persuasion, that their Gods were pleased with their Blood, and were nourished with the Smoke, and Nidor of them; and therefore the more costly, they thought them the more acceptable, for which Reason, they stuck not sometimes to regale them with human Sacrifices.
  8. (dated, intransitive) To be puzzled (at something), have difficulty understanding.
    • 1706, John Locke, Of the Conduct of the Understanding, Cambridge: J. Nicholson, 1781, pp. 48-49,[6]
      He that has to do with young scholars, especially in mathematics, may perceive how their minds open by degrees, and how it is exercise alone that opens them. Sometimes they will stick a long time at a part of a demonstration, not for want of perceiving the connection of two ideas; that, to one whose understanding is more exercised, is as visible as any thing can be.
  9. (dated, intransitive) To cause difficulties, scruples, or hesitation.
    • 1708, Jonathan Swift, The Sentiments of a Church-of-England-Man, with respect to Religion and Government, in The Works of Jonathan Swift, 7th edition, Edinburgh: G. Hamilton et al., 1752, Volume I, Miscellanies in Prose, p. 73,[7]
      [] this is the Difficulty that seemeth chiefly to stick with the most reasonable of those, who, from a mere Scruple of Conscience, refuse to join with us upon the Revolution Principle [] .
  10. (transitive) To attach with glue or as if by gluing.
  11. (transitive) To place, set down (quickly or carelessly).
  12. (transitive) To press (something with a sharp point) into something else.
    to stick a needle into one’s finger
    • The points of spears are stuck within the shield.
    1. (transitive, now only in dialects) To stab.
      • circa 1583, John Jewel, in a sermon republished in 1847 in The Works of John Jewel, Bishop of Salisbury, portion 2, page 969:
        In certain of their sacrifices they had a lamb, they sticked him, they killed him, and made sacrifice of him: this lamb was Christ the Son of God, he was killed, sticked, and made a sweet-smelling sacrifice for our sins.
      • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act III Scene 1
        Thou stickest a dagger in me: I shall never see my gold again: fourscore ducats at a sitting! fourscore ducats!
      • 1809, Grafton’s chronicle, or history of England, volume 2, page 135:
        [] would haue [=have] sticked him with a dagger []
      • 1908, The Northeastern Reporter, volume 85, page 693:
        The defendant said he didn’t shoot; “he sticked him with a knife.”
  13. (transitive) To fix on a pointed instrument; to impale.
    to stick an apple on a fork
  14. (transitive, archaic) To adorn or deck with things fastened on as by piercing.
  15. (transitive, gymnastics) To perform (a landing) perfectly.
  16. (botany, transitive) To propagate plants by cuttings.
  17. (transitive, joinery) To run or plane (mouldings) in a machine, in contradistinction to working them by hand. Such mouldings are said to be stuck.
  18. (dated, transitive) To bring to a halt; to stymie; to puzzle.
    to stick somebody with a hard problem
  19. (transitive, slang, dated) To impose upon; to compel to pay; sometimes, to cheat.
  20. (intransitive, US, slang) To have sexual intercourse with.
  21. (intransitive, blackjack, chiefly Britain) To stand pat: to cease taking any more cards and finalize one’s hand.
Usage notes

In Early Modern English, the past participles stucken and sticken are occasionally found; they are not known in the modern language, even as archaisms.

Synonyms
  • (to adhere): cleave, cling; see also Thesaurus:adhere
  • (to stop moving): jam, stall; see also Thesaurus:stop
  • (to tolerate): live with, put up with; See also Thesaurus:tolerate
  • (persist): abide, carry on; see also Thesaurus:persevere
  • (to remain loyal): stand by, stick by
  • (to hesitate): falter, waver; see also Thesaurus:hesitate
  • (to be puzzled at): puzzle
  • (to attach with glue): agglutinate, conglutinate, glue, gum, paste
  • (to place): pop, set down
  • (to press into with a sharp point): pierce, prick, puncture
  • (to fix on a pointed instrument): fix, impale, stake, run through, transfix
  • (to bring to a halt): stump, thwart
  • (to have sexual intercourse): have sex; see also Thesaurus:copulate
Derived terms

Note: Terms derived from the noun are found above.

Translations
See also

Adjective

stick (comparative sticker, superlative stickest)

  1. (informal) Likely to stick; sticking, sticky.
    A non-stick pan. A stick plaster.
    A sticker type of glue. The stickest kind of gum.
Usage notes
  • The adjective is more informal than nonstandard due to the prevalence of examples such as “non-stick pan” or “stick plaster”.
  • The comparative and superlative remain nonstandard (vs. stickier and stickiest) and are sometimes seen inbetween quotation marks to reflect it.
Derived terms

Etymology 3

Possibly a metaphorical use of the first etymology (“twig, branch”), possibly derived from the Yiddish schtick.

Noun

stick (plural sticks)

  1. (Britain, uncountable) Criticism or ridicule.

Anagrams

  • ticks

Chinook Jargon

Etymology

Borrowed from English stick.

Noun

stick

  1. stick
  2. wood, firewood
  3. tree, forest

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed shortenings from several English compounds, in all cases equivalent to a borrowing from English stick.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɪk/
  • Hyphenation: stick
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Noun

stick m (plural sticks, diminutive stickje n)

  1. A hockey stick.
    Synonym: hockeystick
  2. A joystick, stick-shaped control device.
  3. A memory stick to store IT data.

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃtɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Verb

stick

  1. singular imperative of sticken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of sticken

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

stick n

  1. a sting; a bite from an insect
  2. (card games) a trick

Declension

Descendants

  • Finnish: tikki

Verb

stick

  1. imperative of sticka.

Anagrams

  • ticks

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial