bond vs tie what difference

what is difference between bond and tie

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɑnd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɒnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English bond, a variant of band, from Old English beand, bænd, bend (bond, chain, fetter, band, ribbon, ornament, chaplet, crown), from Proto-Germanic *bandaz, *bandiz (band, fetter). Cognate with Dutch band, German Band, Swedish band. Doublet of Bund. Related to bind.

Noun

bond (plural bonds)

  1. (law) Evidence of a long-term debt, by which the bond issuer (the borrower) is obliged to pay interest when due, and repay the principal at maturity, as specified on the face of the bond certificate. The rights of the holder are specified in the bond indenture, which contains the legal terms and conditions under which the bond was issued. Bonds are available in two forms: registered bonds, and bearer bonds.
  2. (finance) A documentary obligation to pay a sum or to perform a contract; a debenture.
  3. A partial payment made to show a provider that the customer is sincere about buying a product or a service. If the product or service is not purchased the customer then forfeits the bond.
  4. (often in the plural) A physical connection which binds, a band.
  5. An emotional link, connection or union; that which holds two or more people together, as in a friendship; a tie.
    • 1792, Edmund Burke, a letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe on the subject of the Roman Catholics of Ireland
      a people with whom I have no tie but the common bond of mankind.
  6. Moral or political duty or obligation.
  7. (chemistry) A link or force between neighbouring atoms in a molecule.
  8. A binding agreement, a covenant.
  9. A bail bond.
  10. Any constraining or cementing force or material.
  11. (construction) In building, a specific pattern of bricklaying.
  12. In Scotland, a mortgage.
  13. (railways) A heavy copper wire or rod connecting adjacent rails of an electric railway track when used as a part of the electric circuit.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bond (third-person singular simple present bonds, present participle bonding, simple past and past participle bonded)

  1. (transitive) To connect, secure or tie with a bond; to bind.
  2. (transitive) To cause to adhere (one material with another).
  3. (transitive, chemistry) To form a chemical compound with.
  4. (transitive) To guarantee or secure a financial risk.
  5. To form a friendship or emotional connection.
  6. (transitive) To put in a bonded warehouse; to secure (goods) until the associated duties are paid.
  7. (transitive, construction) To lay bricks in a specific pattern.
  8. (transitive, electricity) To make a reliable electrical connection between two conductors (or any pieces of metal that may potentially become conductors).
  9. To bail out by means of a bail bond.
    • 1877, Report No. 704 of proceedings In the Senate of the United States, 44th Congress, 2nd Session, page 642:
      In the August election of 1874 I bonded out of jail eighteen colored men that had been in there, and there has not one of them been tried yet, and they never will be.
    • 1995, Herman Beavers, Wrestling angels into song: the fictions of Ernest J. Gaines, page 28:
      In jail for killing a man, Procter Lewis is placed in a cell where he is faced with a choice: he can be bonded out of jail by Roger Medlow, the owner of the plantation where he lives, or he can serve his time in the penitentiary.
    • 2001, Elaine J. Lawless, Women escaping violence: empowerment through narrative, page xxi:
      And no, you cannot drive her down to the bank to see if her new AFDC card is activated and drop her kids off at school for her because she didn’t think to get her car before he bonded out of jail.

Synonyms

  • (to cause to adhere): cling, stick; see also Thesaurus:adhere
Derived terms
  • bondability
  • bondable
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bonde (peasant, servant, bondman), from Old English bōnda, būnda (householder, freeman, plebeian, husband), perhaps from Old Norse bóndi (husbandman, householder, literally dweller), or a contraction of Old English būend (dweller, inhabitant), both from Proto-Germanic *būwandz (dweller), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew- (to swell, grow). See also bower, boor.

Noun

bond (plural bonds)

  1. A peasant; churl.
  2. A vassal; serf; one held in bondage to a superior.

Adjective

bond (comparative more bond, superlative most bond)

  1. Subject to the tenure called bondage.
  2. In a state of servitude or slavedom; not free.
  3. Servile; slavish; pertaining to or befitting a slave.
Derived terms
  • Bond
  • bondage
  • bondfolk
  • bondland
  • bondly
  • bondmaid
  • bondman, bondsman
  • bondservant
  • bond-service
  • bond-slave
  • bond-tenant
  • bondwoman, bondswoman

Related terms

  • boor
  • bower

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔnt/
  • Hyphenation: bond
  • Rhymes: -ɔnt
  • Homophone: bont

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch bund. The word could also be neuter until the 19th century, when it became increasingly common under the influence of German Bund.

Noun

bond m (plural bonden, diminutive bondje n)

  1. society, fellowship
    Synonym: verbond
  2. union, association, guild
    vakbond – trade union
  3. coalition, alliance, league
    Volkenbond – League of Nations
  4. covenant, agreement
  5. (dated) bundle (set of objects packed or tied together)
Derived terms
  • bondsrepubliek
  • bondsstaat
  • Volkenbond
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: bond
  • Papiamentu: bònt

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

bond

  1. singular past indicative of binden

French

Etymology

From bondir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔ̃/
  • Homophones: bon, bons, bonds
  • Rhymes: -ɔ̃

Noun

bond m (plural bonds)

  1. jump, bound, leap
  2. bounce

Derived terms

  • faire faux bond
  • saisir la balle au bond

Further reading

  • “bond” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Noun

bond

  1. Alternative form of band


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Homophones: Tai, Thai, Ty

Etymology 1

From Middle English tei, teie, from Old English tēag, tēah, from Proto-Germanic *taugō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dewk-. Compare Danish tov, Icelandic taug.

Noun

tie (plural ties)

  1. A knot; a fastening.
  2. A knot of hair, as at the back of a wig.
  3. A necktie (item of clothing consisting of a strip of cloth tied around the neck). See also bow tie, black tie.
    Synonym: necktie
  4. A twist tie, a piece of wire embedded in paper, strip of plastic with ratchets, or similar object which is wound around something and tightened.
  5. A strong connection between people or groups of people.
    Synonym: bond
    • 1866, Charlotte Mary Yonge, The Prince and the Page
      No distance breaks the tie of blood.
    • 2004, Peter Bondanella, Hollywood Italians: Dagos, Palookas, Romeos, Wise Guys, and Sopranos, chapter 4, 231–232:
      The film ends with the colorful deaths of Nico’s enemies after he thwarts their attempts to assassinate a U.S. Senator investigating ties between drug dealers and the CIA.
  6. (construction) A structural member firmly holding two pieces together.
  7. (rail transport, US) A horizontal wooden or concrete structural member that supports and ties together rails.
    Synonym: (British) sleeper
  8. The situation in which two or more participants in a competition are placed equally.
    Synonym: draw
  9. (cricket) The situation at the end of all innings of a match where both sides have the same total of runs (different from a draw).
  10. (sports, US) An equalizer, a run, goal, point, etc which causes participants in a competition to be placed equally or have the same score(s).
    • 2010, Scott Glabb, A Saint in the City: Coaching At-risk Kids to Be Champions, Tate Publishing (→ISBN), page 146:
      I thought José was still a point down. I thought he needed another takedown to tie and pull ahead, so I ordered José to let his man up. I looked up too late, realizing that José already scored a tie. By that point, the New Jersey champion got his …
    • 1971, Budapress News Service, Budapress Bulletin, volume 10, issues 27-52, page 8:
      [] game in the championships shouldering a vast disadvantage and was in due course defeated by Egyetértés, one of the newcomers in the first league. Eger, the other novice in the championships, also took off successfully scoring a tie with the Ruha ETO.
  11. (sports, Britain) A meeting between two players or teams in a competition.
  12. (music) A curved line connecting two notes of the same pitch denoting that they should be played as a single note with the combined length of both notes.
    Coordinate term: slur
  13. (statistics) One or more equal values or sets of equal values in the data set.
  14. (surveying) A bearing and distance between a lot corner or point and a benchmark or iron off site.
  15. (graph theory) A connection between two vertices.
  16. A tiewig.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, I.13:
      [H]e ordered his boarders and apartments to be dished out for the occasion, spared no pains in adorning his own person, and in particular employed a whole hour in adjusting a voluminous tye, in which he proposed to make his appearance.
Usage notes
  • In cricket, a tie and a draw are not the same. See Result (cricket).
  • In music, not to be confused with a slur.
Derived terms
  • cup tie
  • hair tie
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English teien, teiȝen, from Old English tīġan, tīeġan, from Proto-Germanic *taugijaną, from Proto-Indo-European *dewk- (to tug, draw). Cognate with Icelandic teygja.

Verb

tie (third-person singular simple present ties, present participle tying, simple past and past participle tied)

  1. (transitive) To twist (a string, rope, or the like) around itself securely.
  2. (transitive) To form (a knot or the like) in a string or the like.
  3. (transitive) To attach or fasten (one thing to another) by string or the like.
    • In bond of virtuous love together tied.
  4. (transitive) To secure (something) by string or the like.
    • Not tied to rules of policy, you find / Revenge less sweet than a forgiving mind.
  5. (transitive or intransitive) To have the same score or position as another in a competition or ordering.
  6. (US, transitive) To have the same score or position as (another) in a competition or ordering.
  7. (music) To unite (musical notes) with a line or slur in the notation.
  8. (US, dated, colloquial) To believe; to credit.
    • 1929, Collier’s (volume 84, page 56)
      [] It seems they have sort of betrothal teas — can you tie it?”
      “Heavens!” said Mary []
    • 1940, Woman’s Home Companion (volume 67, issues 1-4, page 134)
      As the door slammed Pete turned to Hally, fuming. “Can you tie that? A little twopenny cold frightening him off.”
  9. (programming, transitive) In the Perl programming language, to extend (a variable) so that standard operations performed upon it invoke custom functionality instead.
    • 2000, Larry Wall, Tom Christiansen, Jon Orwant, Programming Perl: 3rd Edition (page 814)
      So, a class for tying a hash to an ISAM implementation might provide an extra method to traverse a set of keys sequentially (the “S” of ISAM), since your typical DBM implementation can’t do that.
Synonyms
  • fasten
  • link
  • bind
Antonyms
  • unfasten
  • untie
Derived terms
  • tie down
  • tie-in, tie in
  • tie the knot
  • tie up
Translations

References

  • tie in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Further reading

  • tie on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • -ite, EIT, ETI, ITE, TEI

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse þegja, from Proto-Germanic *þagjaną, cognate with Swedish tiga, Gothic ???????????????????? (þahan). The Germanic verb is probably cognate with Latin taceō (to be silent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtiːə/, [ˈtˢiːi]

Verb

tie (past tense tav or tiede, past participle tiet)

  1. to be silent, fall silent

Inflection

Related terms

  • tie stille

Esperanto

Etymology

From ti- (demonstrative correlative prefix) +‎ -e (correlative suffix of location).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtie/
  • Hyphenation: ti‧e
  • Rhymes: -ie
  • Audio:

Adverb

tie (accusative tien)

  1. there (demonstrative correlative of location)
    Iun nokton li havis strangan sonĝon. Voĉo diris al li: —Iru al Amsterdamo kaj tie sur la Papen-ponto vi trovos trezoron.
    One night he had a strange dream. A voice told him: “Go to Amsterdam and there over the Papen-bridge you will find a treasure.

Usage notes

When combined with ĉi, the adverbial particle of proximity, tie ĉi means here.

Derived terms

  • ĉi tie, tie ĉi
  • tiea
  • tieulo

Related terms

  • kie
  • ie
  • nenie

Finnish

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *tee, from Proto-Finno-Permic *teje.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtie̯/, [ˈt̪ie̞̯]
  • Rhymes: -ie
  • Syllabification: tie

Noun

tie

  1. way (by which to go/walk/move)
  2. road
  3. avenue
  4. path

Declension

Derived terms

Compounds

Anagrams

  • ite

Karelian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *tee, possibly from Proto-Uralic *teje.

Noun

tie (genitive tien, partitive tiedy)

  1. way
  2. road

Latvian

Pronoun

tie

  1. those; nominative plural masculine form of tas

Ludian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *tee.

Noun

tie

  1. way

Mandarin

Romanization

tie

  1. Nonstandard spelling of tiē.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of tié.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of tiě.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of tiè.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse þegja.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtiːe/

Verb

tie (present tense tier, simple past tidde or tiet, past participle tidd or tiet)

  1. to become quiet, stop talking
  2. to be quiet

See also

  • teie, teia (Nynorsk)

References

  • “tie” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

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