bonnet vs hood what difference

what is difference between bonnet and hood

English

Alternative forms

  • (Scottish brimless hat): bunnet

Etymology

From Middle English bonet, from Middle French bonet (Modern French bonnet), from Old French bonet (material from which hats are made), from Frankish *bunni (that which is bound), from Proto-Germanic *bundiją (bundle), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie). Compare also Late Latin abbonis, obbonis (ribbon of a headdress), also of Germanic origin, from Frankish *obbunni, from *ob- (above, over) + *bunni. Cognate with Old High German gibunt (band, ribbon), Middle Dutch bont (bundle, truss), Gothic ???????????????????????????? (gabundi, bond). More at over, bundle.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɒn.ɪt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbɑn.ɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnɪt

Noun

bonnet (plural bonnets)

  1. A type of hat, once worn by women or children, held in place by ribbons tied under the chin.
  2. A traditional Scottish woollen brimless cap; a bunnet.
  3. (by extension) The polishing head of a power buffer, often made of wool.
  4. (Australia, Britain, New Zealand, South Africa, automotive) The hinged cover over the engine of a motor car; a hood.
  5. (nautical) A length of canvas attached to a fore-and-aft sail to increase the pulling power.
  6. (obsolete, slang) An accomplice of a gambler, auctioneer, etc., who entices others to bet or to bid.
  7. The second stomach of a ruminant.
  8. Anything resembling a bonnet (hat) in shape or use.
    1. A small defence work at a salient angle; or a part of a parapet elevated to screen the other part from enfilade fire.
    2. A metallic canopy, or projection, over an opening, as a fireplace, or a cowl or hood to increase the draught of a chimney, etc.
    3. A frame of wire netting over a locomotive chimney, to prevent escape of sparks.
    4. A roofing over the cage of a mine, to protect its occupants from objects falling down the shaft.
    5. In pumps, a metal covering for the openings in the valve chambers.
    6. (mycology) A mushroom of the genus Mycena.

Synonyms

  • (Scottish brimless hat): tam o’shanter
  • (cover over the engine of a motor car): hood (US, Canada)

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Scottish Gaelic: bonaid

Translations

Verb

bonnet (third-person singular simple present bonnets, present participle bonneting, simple past and past participle bonneted)

  1. (transitive) To put a bonnet on.
  2. (obsolete) To take off the bonnet or cap as a mark of respect; to uncover.
  3. (dated, transitive) To pull the bonnet or cap down over the head of.
    Synonym: block

See also

  • boot

Anagrams

  • Benton, bent on

French

Etymology

From Middle French bonet, from Old French bonet (material from which hats are made), from Frankish *bunni (that which is bound), from Proto-Germanic *bundiją (bundle), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie). Compare also Late Latin abbonis, obbonis (ribbon of a headdress), also of Germanic origin, from Frankish *obbunni, from *ob- (above, over) + *bunni. Cognates: see above, English bonnet. More at over, bundle.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔ.nɛ/

Noun

bonnet m (plural bonnets)

  1. beanie
  2. hat, cap
  3. bonnet (for baby)
  4. a knitted hat, usually woollen
  5. cup (of bra)

Derived terms

  • blanc bonnet, bonnet blanc
  • bonnet blanc, blanc bonnet
  • bonnet d’âne
  • bonnet de nuit
  • bonnet phrygien
  • bonnet rouge
  • gros bonnet
  • opiner du bonnet

Descendants

  • Portuguese: boné
  • Spanish: bonete

Further reading

  • “bonnet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hʊd/
    • (General American) IPA(key): [hʊ̈d], [hɪ̈d]
  • Rhymes: -ʊd

Etymology 1

From Middle English hood, hod, from Old English hōd, from Proto-Germanic *hōdaz (cognate with Saterland Frisian Houd, West Frisian/Dutch hoed, German Low German Hood, German Hut). Cognate with Proto-Iranian *xawdaH (hat) (compare Avestan ????????????????(xåda), Old Persian ???????????? (x-u-d /xaudā/)), from Proto-Indo-European *kadʰ- (to cover). More at hat.

Noun

hood (plural hoods)

  1. A covering for the head attached to a larger garment such as a jacket or cloak.
  2. A distinctively coloured fold of material, representing a university degree.
  3. An enclosure that protects something, especially from above.
  4. Particular parts of conveyances
    1. (automotive, chiefly Britain) A soft top of a convertible car or carriage.
    2. (automotive, chiefly US, Canada) The hinged cover over the engine of a motor vehicle, known as a bonnet in other countries.
      Synonyms: cowl, bonnet
    3. (by extension, especially in the phrase “under the hood”) A cover over the engine, driving machinery or inner workings of something.
      • 2004, D. Michael Abrashoff, Get Your Ship Together: How Great Leaders Inspire Ownership From The Keel Up, Penguin (→ISBN):
        Like many captains, I was just as glad to leave engineering to the engineers. Looking under the ship’s hood wasn’t what interested me.
      • 2015, Max Lucado, Let the Journey Begin: Finding God’s Best for Your Life, Thomas Nelson (→ISBN), page 71:
        I never see the pilot percolating coffee or the attendant with a screwdriver under the airplane’s hood. Why? Because we all have something we are good at, and we are expected to do that one thing well.
    4. A metal covering that leads to a vent to suck away smoke or fumes.
    5. (nautical) One of the endmost planks (or, one of the ends of the planks) in a ship’s bottom at bow or stern, that fits into the rabbet. (These, when fit into the rabbet, resemble a hood (covering).)
      • 1830, A Treatise on Marine Architecture, page 260:
        Care must also be taken to place the tenons on the main post so that a stop-water can be driven between it and the fore tenon and the rabbet of the hoods at the keel. The post being dressed to its proper dimensions, the tenons cut, and their …
      • 1874, Samuel James P. Thearle, Naval architecture: a treatise on laying off and building wood, iron, and composite ships. [With] Plates, page 360:
        The fore hoods end at a rabbet cut in the wood stem (see Plate CXVIII.), and the after hoods end at a rabbet prepared in the yellow metal body post. The fore hoods are fastened to the bottom plating as elsewhere; but in the stem they have  …
      • 1940, Lauchlan McKay, Richard Cornelius McKay, The Practical hip-builder, page 62:
        But for deep and narrow vessels you must line your hooden-ends wider to get up faster, and consequently the lower ends of the after-hoods will come round, []
  5. Various body parts
    1. (ophiology) An expansion on the sides of the neck typical for many elapids e.g. the Egyptian cobra (Naja haje) and Indian cobra (Naja naja).
    2. (colloquial) The osseous or cartilaginous marginal extension behind the back of many a dinosaur such as a ceratopsid and reptiles such as Chlamydosaurus kingii.
      Synonym: frill
    3. In the human hand, over the extensor digitorum, an expansion of the extensor tendon over the metacarpophalangeal joint (the extensor hood syn. dorsal hood syn. lateral hood)
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • cuculliform (hood-shaped)

Verb

hood (third-person singular simple present hoods, present participle hooding, simple past and past participle hooded)

  1. To cover something with a hood.
    Antonym: unhood
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • 2004, George Fletcher Bass, Serçe Limanı: An Eleventh-century Shipwreck, Texas A&M University Press (→ISBN), page 516:
    Hooding ends [Hoods, Hood ends] The ends of planks that fit into the stem and sternpost rabbets.

Etymology 2

Clipping of hoodlum.

Noun

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (slang) Gangster, thug.
    • 1968, John McPhee, The Pine Barrens, Chapter 7
      Teen-age hoods steal cars in cities, take them into the pines, strip them, ignite them, and leave the scene.
Translations

Etymology 3

Clipping of neighborhood; compare nabe.

Alternative forms

  • ‘hood

Adjective

hood (not comparable)

  1. Relating to inner-city everyday life, both positive and negative aspects; especially people’s attachment to and love for their neighborhoods.
Translations

Noun

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (African American Vernacular English, slang) Neighborhood.
Usage notes

Particularly used for poor US inner-city black neighborhoods. Also used more generally, as a casual neutral term for “neighborhood”, but marked by strong associations.

Synonyms
  • (poor neighborhood, esp. black): ghetto
  • (neighborhood): nabe, neighborhood
Translations

Etymology 4

Clipping of hoodie, influenced by existing sense “hoodlum”.

Noun

hood (plural hoods)

  1. (Britain) Person wearing a hoodie.

Anagrams

  • Hodo, hodo-

Manx

Pronoun

hood (emphatic form hoods)

  1. (informal) second-person singular of hug
    to you

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • hode, hod, hude, hudde, hoode

Etymology

From Old English hōd, from Proto-Germanic *hōdaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hoːd/
  • Rhymes: -oːd

Noun

hood (plural hoodes)

  1. hood (part of a garment):
    1. A hood as a symbol of rank (of the church and of guilds).
    2. A hood made of chain mail used as head armour.
  2. (rare, Late Middle English) Any sort of protective cloaking or covering.

Derived terms

  • hoden
  • hoder
  • hodles
  • hodynge

Descendants

  • English: hood
  • Scots: hude, huid

References

  • “họ̄d, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-12.

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian hâved.

Noun

hood n (plural hööd)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) (anatomy) head
    at hood sködle

    to shake one’s head

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