bonus vs fillip what difference

what is difference between bonus and fillip

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin bonus (good).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbəʊ.nəs/
  • Rhymes: -əʊnəs
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈboʊ.nəs/
  • Rhymes: -oʊnəs

Noun

bonus (plural bonuses or bonusses or boni)

  1. Something extra that is good; an added benefit.
  2. An extra sum given as a premium, e.g. to an employee or to a shareholder.
  3. (video games) An addition to the player’s score based on performance, e.g. for time remaining.
    • 1988, David Powell, Rygar (video game review) in Your Sinclair issue 25
      Spend the time killing things and there’s a bonus for each hit – but only for fatalities notched up since the start of your current life.
  4. (basketball) One or more free throws awarded to a team when the opposing team has accumulated enough fouls.

Derived terms

  • Bonusgate
  • signing bonus

Translations

Verb

bonus (third-person singular simple present bonuses or bonusses, present participle bonusing or bonussing, simple past and past participle bonused or bonussed)

  1. (transitive) To pay a bonus, premium

Descendants

  • Danish: bonus
  • French: bonus
  • German: Bonus
  • Portuguese: bónus
  • Japanese: ボーナス (bōnasu)

Anagrams

  • Bonsu, bo’sun, bosun, bouns

Czech

Etymology

From Latin bonus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbonus]
  • Hyphenation: bo‧nus

Noun

bonus m inan

  1. bonus

Declension

Further reading

  • bonus in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • bonus in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

Via English bonus from Latin bonus (good).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥oːnus]

Noun

bonus c (singular definite bonussen, plural indefinite bonusser)

  1. bonus (an extra sum given as a premium, e.g. to an employee or to a shareholder)
  2. bonus (an unexpected benefit)
  3. bonus (an extraordinary reduction of a price)

Inflection


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin bonus (good).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈboː.nʏs/
  • Hyphenation: bo‧nus

Noun

bonus m (plural bonussen or boni, diminutive bonusje n)

  1. A bonus, an extra or premium.
  2. (by extension) Any one-off gain.
  3. Good marks in a rating scale, notably to calculate an insurance premium dependent on the number of accidents.

Derived terms

  • bonusaandeel
  • bonuscultuur
  • bonus-malus
  • bonuslevel
  • bonuspunt
  • bonusscore

Descendants

  • Indonesian: bonus

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English bonus or Latin bonus.

Noun

bonus

  1. A bonus (something extra)
  2. A bonus (extra payment to an employee)

Declension

Synonyms

  • (something extra): ekstra, lisäetu, plussa
  • (employee bonus): kannustuspalkkio, tulospalkkio

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English bonus, from Latin bonus. Compare bon (good), a doublet inherited from the same Latin word.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔ.nys/

Noun

bonus m (uncountable)

  1. premium
  2. bonus

Antonyms

  • malus

Further reading

  • “bonus” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch bonus, from Latin bonus (good).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbonʊs]
  • Hyphenation: bo‧nus

Noun

bonus

  1. bonus,
    1. something extra that is good; an added benefit.
    2. an extra sum given as a premium, e.g. to an employee or to a shareholder.
      Synonyms: gratifikasi, insentif

Further reading

  • “bonus” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin bonus. Compare the inherited doublet buono (good).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔ.nus/

Noun

bonus m (invariable)

  1. a bonus (all senses)

Latin

Etymology

From Old Latin duenos, later duonus, from Proto-Italic *dwenos, from Proto-Indo-European *dew- (to show favor, revere). Some relate it to Ancient Greek δέος (déos), whence δεινός (deinós), δειλός (deilós).
Compare the change from duellum to bellum (war).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈbo.nus/, [ˈbɔnʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈbo.nus/, [ˈbɔːnus]

Adjective

bonus (feminine bona, neuter bonum, comparative melior, superlative optimus or optumus, adverb bene); first/second-declension adjective

  1. good, honest, brave, noble, kind, pleasant
    Antonym: malus
  2. right
  3. useful
  4. valid
  5. healthy
  6. quality

Declension

First/second-declension adjective.

Derived terms

  • bonitās
  • cui bonō

Related terms

Descendants

Noun

bonus m (genitive bonī); second declension

  1. A good, moral, honest or brave man
  2. A gentleman

Declension

Second-declension noun.

References

  • bonus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • bonus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • bonus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • bonus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Further reading

  • bonus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowed from English bonus or Latin bonus.

Noun

bonus m (definite singular bonusen, indefinite plural bonuser, definite plural bonusene)

  1. a bonus

References

  • “bonus” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from English bonus or Latin bonus.

Noun

bonus m (definite singular bonusen, indefinite plural bonusar, definite plural bonusane)

  1. a bonus

References

  • “bonus” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English bonus, from Latin bonus. Compare the doublet bueno (good), inherited from the same Latin word.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbonus/, [ˈbo.nus]

Noun

bonus m (plural bonus)

  1. bonus


English

Etymology

From Middle English filippen, philippe (to flick or snap a finger against the thumb); further origin uncertain, but probably imitative. It is not clear whether the verb is derived from the noun, or vice versa.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɪlɪp/
  • Homophones: Philip, Phillip
  • Hyphenation: fil‧lip

Noun

fillip (plural fillips)

  1. (archaic) The action of holding the tip of a finger against the thumb and then releasing it with a snap; a flick.
  2. A sharp strike or tap made using this action, or (by extension) by other means.
  3. (by extension) Something unimportant, a trifle; also, the brief time it takes to flick one’s finger (see noun sense 1); a jiffy.
  4. (by extension) Something that excites or stimulates.

Translations

Verb

fillip (third-person singular simple present fillips, present participle filliping or (archaic) fillipping, simple past and past participle filliped or (archaic) fillipped)

  1. (transitive) To strike, project, or propel with a fillip (that is, a finger released quickly after being pressed against the thumb); to flick.
  2. (transitive, by extension) To project quickly; to snap.
  3. (transitive, by extension) To strike or tap smartly.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To drive as if by a fillip (noun sense 1); to excite, stimulate, whet.
  5. (transitive, intransitive) To make a fillip (noun sense 1) (with the fingers).

Derived terms

  • filliping (noun)

Related terms

  • flip (possibly)

Translations

References


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