book vs leger what difference

what is difference between book and leger

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bo͝ok, IPA(key): /bʊk/
  • enPR: bo͞ok IPA(key): /buːk/ (still sometimes northern England; otherwise obsolete)
  • plural
  • Rhymes: -ʊk
  • Homophone: buck (accents without the foot–⁠strut split)

Etymology 1

From Middle English booke, book, bok, from Old English bōc, from Proto-West Germanic *bōk, from Proto-Germanic *bōks. Eclipsed non-native Middle English livret, lyveret (book, booklet) from Old French livret (book, booklet). Bookmaker sense by clipping.

Alternative forms

  • booke (archaic)

Noun

book (plural books)

  1. A collection of sheets of paper bound together to hinge at one edge, containing printed or written material, pictures, etc.
    • 1962, James East Irby translating Luis Borges as “The Library of Babel”:
      I repeat: it suffices that a book be possible for it to exist. Only the impossible is excluded. For example: no book can be a ladder, although no doubt there are books which discuss and negate and demonstrate this possibility and others whose structure corresponds to that of a ladder.
    • 1983, Steve Horelick & al., “Reading Rainbow”:
      I can be anything.
      Take a look!
      It’s in a book:
      A reading rainbow.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, page 51:
      Trefusis’s quarters could be described in one word. Books. Books and books and books. And then, just when an observer might be lured into thinking that that must be it, more books… Trefusis himself was highly dismissive of them. ‘Waste of trees,’ he had once said. ‘Stupid, ugly, clumsy, heavy things. The sooner technology comes up with a reliable alternative the better… The world is so fond of saying that books should be “treated with respect”. But when are we told that words should be treated with respect?’
    She opened the book to page 37 and began to read aloud.
    He was frustrated because he couldn’t find anything about dinosaurs in the book.
  2. A long work fit for publication, typically prose, such as a novel or textbook, and typically published as such a bound collection of sheets, but now sometimes electronically as an e-book.
    I have three copies of his first book.
  3. A major division of a long work.
    Genesis is the first book of the Bible.
    Many readers find the first book of A Tale of Two Cities to be confusing.
    Synonyms: tome, volume
  4. (gambling) A record of betting (from the use of a notebook to record what each person has bet).
    I’m running a book on who is going to win the race.
  5. (informal) A bookmaker (a person who takes bets on sporting events and similar); bookie; turf accountant.
  6. A convenient collection, in a form resembling a book, of small paper items for individual use.
    a book of stamps
    a book of raffle tickets
    Synonym: booklet
  7. (theater) The script of a musical or opera.
    Synonym: libretto
  8. (usually in the plural) Records of the accounts of a business.
    Synonyms: account, record
  9. (law, colloquial) A book award, a recognition for receiving the highest grade in a class (traditionally an actual book, but recently more likely a letter or certificate acknowledging the achievement).
  10. (whist) Six tricks taken by one side.
  11. (poker slang) four of a kind
  12. (sports) A document, held by the referee, of the incidents happened in the game.
  13. (sports, by extension) A list of all players who have been booked (received a warning) in a game.
  14. (cartomancy) The twenty-sixth Lenormand card.
  15. (figuratively) Any source of instruction.
  16. (with “the”) The accumulated body of knowledge passed down among black pimps.
    • 1974, Adrienne Lanier Seward, The Black Pimp as a Folk Hero (page 11)
      The Book is an oral tradition of belief in The Life that has been passed down from player to player from generation to generation.
    • 1994, Antiquarian Book Monthly (volume 21, page 36)
      On the other hand The Book is an oral tradition containing the rules and principles to be adopted by a pimp who wishes to be a player.
Synonyms
  • See Thesaurus:book
Hyponyms
  • See Thesaurus:book
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations

See book/translations § Noun.

See also
  • incunable
  • scroll
  • tome
  • volume

Etymology 2

From Middle English booken, boken, from Old English bōcian, ġebōcian, from the noun (see above).

Verb

book (third-person singular simple present books, present participle booking, simple past and past participle booked)

  1. (transitive) To reserve (something) for future use.
    Synonym: reserve
  2. (transitive) To write down, to register or record in a book or as in a book.
    They booked that message from the hill
    Synonyms: make a note of, note down, record, write down
  3. (transitive) To add a name to the list of people who are participating in something.
    I booked a flight to New York.
    Synonyms: sign up, register, reserve, schedule, enroll
  4. (law enforcement, transitive) To record the name and other details of a suspected offender and the offence for later judicial action.
    The police booked him for driving too fast.
  5. (sports) To issue with a caution, usually a yellow card, or a red card if a yellow card has already been issued.
  6. (intransitive, slang) To travel very fast.
    He was really booking, until he passed the speed trap.
    Synonyms: bomb, hurtle, rocket, speed, shoot, whiz
  7. To record bets as bookmaker.
  8. (transitive, law student slang) To receive the highest grade in a class.
    The top three students had a bet on which one was going to book their intellectual property class.
  9. (intransitive, slang) To leave.
    He was here earlier, but he booked.
Derived terms
Translations

See book/translations § Verb.

Etymology 3

From Middle English book, bok, from Old English bōc, from Proto-Germanic *bōk, first and third person singular indicative past tense of Proto-Germanic *bakaną (to bake).

Verb

book

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England) simple past tense of bake

References

Anagrams

  • Boko, Koob, boko, bòkò, kobo

Limburgish

Etymology

From Middle Dutch boec, from Old Dutch buok, from Proto-Germanic *bōks.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /boːk/

Noun

book n (plural beuk)

  1. book

Mansaka

Noun

book

  1. piece

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English bōc.

Noun

book (plural books)

  1. Alternative form of booke

Etymology 2

From Old English būc.

Noun

book (plural books)

  1. Alternative form of bouk

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

book

  1. imperative of booke


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛdʒə(ɹ)/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French léger, assumed to be from Latin leviarius, from levis (light in weight). See levity.

Adjective

leger (comparative more leger, superlative most leger)

  1. (obsolete) Light; slender, slim; trivial.
    • 1597, Francis Bacon, Of the Colours of Good and Evil
      a leger Evil

Etymology 2

A variant of ledger.

Adjective

leger (comparative more leger, superlative most leger)

  1. Lying or remaining in a place; hence, resident.

Noun

leger (plural legers)

  1. An ambassador or minister resident at a court or seat of government; a leiger or lieger.
    • Sir Edward Carne, the queen’s leger at Rome
  2. (obsolete) Anything that lies in a place; that which, or one who, remains in a place.
  3. (obsolete) Alternative form of ledger (book for keeping notes, especially one for keeping accounting records)

Verb

leger (third-person singular simple present legers, present participle legering, simple past and past participle legered)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, Britain, fishing) Alternative form of ledger (to use (a certain type of bait) in bottom fishing; to engage in bottom fishing)

Anagrams

  • Ergle, regle

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈleː.ɣər/
  • Hyphenation: le‧ger
  • Rhymes: -eːɣər

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch leger, from Proto-West Germanic *legr, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *legrą.

Noun

leger n (plural legers, diminutive legertje n)

  1. army, armed forces
  2. form (habitation of a hare)
  3. (archaic) bed, crib
  4. (figuratively) mass, multitude
  5. Short for dijkleger.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: leër
  • English: leaguer

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective

leger

  1. Comparative form of leeg

Verb

leger

  1. first-person singular present indicative of legeren
  2. imperative of legeren

Anagrams

  • geler, regel

German

Etymology

Borrowed from French léger.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /leˈʒɛːɐ̯/, /leˈʒeːɐ̯/
  • Hyphenation: le‧ger

Adjective

leger (comparative legerer, superlative am legersten)

  1. casual, informal
  2. (of clothing) dressed down

Declension

Further reading

  • “leger” in Duden online
  • “leger” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch legger (ledger).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɛɡər/
  • Hyphenation: lè‧gêr

Noun

lègêr (first-person possessive legerku, second-person possessive legermu, third-person possessive legernya)

  1. (education) a ledger, the marking register.

Further reading

  • “leger” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Interlingua

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /leˈɡer/

Verb

leger

  1. to read

Conjugation


Latin

Verb

lēger

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of lēgō

Middle English

Noun

leger

  1. Alternative form of lygger

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

leger m

  1. indefinite plural of lege

Verb

leger

  1. present of lege

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

leger f

  1. indefinite plural of lege

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *legrą, from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ-. Cognate with Old Frisian leger, Old Saxon legar, Dutch leger (bed, camp, army), Old High German legar (German Lager (camp)), Old Norse legr (Danish lejr, Swedish läger (bed)), Gothic ???????????????????? (ligrs). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek λέχος (lékhos), Latin lectus (bed), Proto-Celtic *leg- (Old Irish lige, Irish luighe), Proto-Slavic *ležati (Russian лежа́ть (ležátʹ)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈle.jer/

Noun

leġer n

  1. the state or action of lying, lying down, or lying ill
  2. resting-place; couch, bed
  3. deathbed, grave

Declension

Related terms

Descendants

  • Middle English: leir, leire, lair, lare
    • English: lair
    • Scots: lair, lear, layer, lare

Romansch

Etymology 1

From Latin legō, legere.

Verb

leger

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Vallader) to read
Conjugation
Alternative forms
  • liger (Sutsilvan, Surmiran)
  • ler (Puter)

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

leger m (feminine singular legra, masculine plural legers, feminine plural legras)

  1. (Sursilvan) merry, happy
    Synonym: allegher
Alternative forms
  • legher (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran)

Swedish

Adjective

leger (comparative legerare, superlative legerast)

  1. Alternative form of legär

Inflection

Anagrams

  • regel

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