boom vs expand what difference

what is difference between boom and expand

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: boo͞m
    • (UK) IPA(key): /buːm/
    • (US) IPA(key): /bum/
  • Rhymes: -uːm

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeic, perhaps borrowed; compare German bummen, Dutch bommen (to hum, buzz).

Verb

boom (third-person singular simple present booms, present participle booming, simple past and past participle boomed)

  1. To make a loud, hollow, resonant sound.
  2. (transitive, figuratively, of speech) To exclaim with force, to shout, to thunder.
  3. Of a Eurasian bittern, to make its deep, resonant territorial vocalisation.
  4. (transitive) To make something boom.
  5. (slang, US, obsolete) To publicly praise.
    • 1922, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Problem of Thor Bridge
      If you pull this off every paper in England and America will be booming you.
  6. To rush with violence and noise, as a ship under a press of sail, before a free wind.
    • 1841, Benjamin Totten, Naval Text-book and Dictionary []
      She comes booming down before it.
Derived terms
  • boom box
  • boom-boom
  • sonic boom
Translations

Noun

boom (plural booms)

  1. A low-pitched, resonant sound, such as of an explosion.
  2. A rapid expansion or increase.
  3. One of the calls of certain monkeys or birds.
    • 1990, Mark A. Berkley, William C. Stebbins, Comparative Perception
      Interestingly, the blue monkey’s boom and pyow calls are both long-distance signals (Brown, 1989), yet the two calls differ in respect to their susceptibility to habitat-induced degradation.
Translations

Interjection

boom

  1. Used to suggest the sound of an explosion.
  2. Used to suggest something happening suddenly and unexpectedly.
    • 1993, Vibe (volume 1, number 2)
      So we went around the corner, looked in the garbage, and, boom, there’s about 16 of the tapes he didn’t like!
    • 2013, Peter Westoby, Gerard Dowling, Theory and Practice of Dialogical Community Development
      Hostile race relations and chronic unemployment are ignored in the suburbs of Paris, London and Sydney, and boom! there are riots.
  3. The sound of a bass drum beating.
  4. The sound of a cannon firing.
Derived terms
  • sis boom bah
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Dutch boom (tree; pole). Doublet of beam.

Noun

boom (plural booms)

  1. (nautical) A spar extending the foot of a sail; a spar rigged outboard from a ship’s side to which boats are secured in harbour.
  2. A movable pole used to support a microphone or camera.
  3. (by extension) A microphone supported on such a pole.
  4. A horizontal member of a crane or derrick, used for lifting.
  5. (electronics) The longest element of a Yagi antenna, on which the other, smaller ones are transversally mounted.
  6. A floating barrier used to obstruct navigation, for military or other purposes; or used for the containment of an oil spill or to control the flow of logs from logging operations.
  7. A wishbone-shaped piece of windsurfing equipment.
  8. The section of the arm on a backhoe closest to the tractor.
  9. A gymnastics apparatus similar to a balance beam.

Derived terms

  • boomhouse
  • boomstick
Related terms
  • (nautical): buoy, cathead
  • crane
Translations

Verb

boom (third-person singular simple present booms, present participle booming, simple past and past participle boomed)

  1. To extend, or push, with a boom or pole.
  2. (usually with “up” or “down”) To raise or lower with a crane boom.

Etymology 3

Perhaps a figurative development of Etymology 1, above.

Noun

boom (plural booms)

  1. (economics, business) A period of prosperity, growth, progress, or high market activity.
Antonyms
  • (period of prosperity): recession
Descendants
  • German: Boom
  • Indonesian: bum
  • Japanese: ブーム (būmu)
  • Polish: boom
Translations

Verb

boom (third-person singular simple present booms, present participle booming, simple past and past participle boomed)

  1. (intransitive) To flourish, grow, or progress.
    Synonyms: flourish, prosper
  2. (transitive, dated) To cause to advance rapidly in price.
Derived terms
  • boom town
Translations

Anagrams

  • MOBO, mobo, moob

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch boom, from Middle Dutch bôom, from Old Dutch bōm, boum, from Proto-Germanic *baumaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʊəm/

Noun

boom (plural bome, diminutive boompie)

  1. tree

Dutch

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch bôom, from Old Dutch bōm, from Proto-West Germanic *baum, from Proto-Germanic *baumaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /boːm/
  • Hyphenation: boom
  • Rhymes: -oːm

Noun

boom m (plural bomen, diminutive boompje n)

  1. tree
  2. any solid, pole-shaped, usually wooden object
    1. beam
    2. mast
      Synonym: mast
    3. boom
      Synonym: giek
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: boom
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: bom
  • Jersey Dutch: bôm
  • Negerhollands: bom, boom
    • Virgin Islands Creole: bom (archaic)
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: bom, boom
  • English: boom
  • Indonesian: bom (tree, pole), bum
  • Sranan Tongo: bon

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English boom.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buːm/
  • Hyphenation: boom

Noun

boom m (plural booms, diminutive boompje n)

  1. boom, as in a market explosion
Derived terms
  • babyboom
  • boomer

References

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

See also

  • boom on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Boom in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

French

Alternative forms

  • boum

Etymology

Borrowed from English boom.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bum/

Noun

boom m (plural booms)

  1. boom (dramatically fast increase)

Derived terms

  • ça boom
  • papy boom

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English boom, from Dutch boom – see above.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbum/

Noun

boom m (invariable)

  1. a boom (sound)
  2. a boom, rapid expansion
  3. a boom (crane)

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch bōm, from Proto-West Germanic *baum.

Noun

bôom m

  1. tree
  2. beam, pole
  3. boom barrier

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: boom
  • Limburgish: boum

Further reading

  • “boom”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “boom (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Polish

Etymology

From English boom.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //bum//

Noun

boom m inan

  1. (economics, business) boom (period of prosperity)
  2. boom (rapid expansion or increase)

Declension

Further reading

  • boom in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • boom in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English boom.

Noun

boom m (plural booms)

  1. (economics, business) boom (period of prosperity)

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English boom.

Noun

boom m (plural booms)

  1. boom (period of prosperity or high market activity)

See also

  • bum


English

Etymology

Recorded in Middle English since 1422 (as expanden, expaunden), from Anglo-Norman espaundre, from Latin expandere present active infinitive of expandō (to spread out), itself from ex- (out, outwards) + pandō (to spread). Doublet of spawn.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ænd
  • IPA(key): /ɛkˈspænd/

Verb

expand (third-person singular simple present expands, present participle expanding, simple past and past participle expanded)

  1. (transitive) To change (something) from a smaller form or size to a larger one; to spread out or lay open.
  2. (transitive) To increase the extent, number, volume or scope of (something).
  3. (transitive) To express (something) at length and/or in detail.
  4. (transitive, algebra) To rewrite (an expression) as a longer, yet equivalent sum of terms.
  5. (intransitive, algebra, of an expression) To become, by rewriting, a longer, yet equivalent sum of terms.
  6. (transitive, arithmetic) To multiply both the numerator and the denominator of a fraction by the same natural number yielding a fraction of equal value
  7. (intransitive) To change or grow from smaller to larger in form, number, or size.
  8. (intransitive) To increase in extent, number, volume or scope.
  9. (intransitive) To speak or write at length or in detail.
  10. (intransitive) To feel generous or optimistic.

Synonyms

  • (to change from a smaller form/size to a larger one): open out, spread, spread out, unfold
  • (to increase the extent, number, volume or scope of): enlarge
  • (to express at length or in detail): elaborate (on), expand on

Antonyms

  • (to change from a smaller form/size to a larger one): contract
  • (to increase the extent, number, volume or scope of): contract
  • (algebra: to rewrite as an equivalent sum of terms): factor

Derived terms

  • expandable
  • expander

Related terms

  • expanse
  • expansible
  • expansile
  • expansive
  • expansion
  • expansionism

Translations


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial