boost vs encouragement what difference

what is difference between boost and encouragement

English

Etymology

Of unknown origin. The verb is first recorded 1815; the noun, 1825. Compare Scots boost (to move; drive off; shoo away), bost, boast (to threaten; scold), Middle English boosten, bosten (to threaten).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buːst/
  • Rhymes: -uːst

Noun

boost (plural boosts)

  1. A push from behind, as to one who is endeavoring to climb.
  2. Something that helps, or adds power or effectiveness; assistance.
  3. (physics) A coordinate transformation that changes velocity.
  4. (automotive engineering) A positive intake manifold pressure in cars with turbochargers or superchargers.

Derived terms

  • battery booster
  • booster
  • boosterism

Translations

Verb

boost (third-person singular simple present boosts, present participle boosting, simple past and past participle boosted)

  1. (transitive) To lift or push from behind (one who is endeavoring to climb); to push up.
  2. (transitive, by extension) To help or encourage (something) to increase or improve; to assist in overcoming obstacles.
    This campaign will boost your chances of winning the election.
  3. (slang, transitive) To steal.
    • 1978, Harold J. Vetter, Ira J. Silverman, The Nature of Crime (page 296)
      It is not at all unusual or suspicious for a woman to spend a good deal of the day out shopping, and feminine clothing styles often make it relatively easy for a female shoplifter to conceal “boosted” merchandise on her person.
  4. (Canada, transitive) To jump-start a vehicle by using cables to connect the battery in a running vehicle to the battery in a vehicle that won’t start.
    • 1980, Popular Mechanics (volume 154, number 4, page 152)
      It’s easy to boost a dead battery, but this can be dangerous if it’s done the wrong way.
    • 2004, “Doug Mitchell”, how to connect for boost? (on newsgroup alt.autos.gm)
      If I want to use the charged Montana battery to boost my old Summit where do I connect the negative cable on the good battery of the Montana?
  5. (transitive, medicine) To give a booster shot to.
  6. (transitive, engineering) To amplify; to signal boost.

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Derived terms

  • overboost
  • upboost

Translations

Anagrams

  • Boots, boots, botos


English

Alternative forms

  • incouragement (archaic)

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French encoragement.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɪnˈkʌɹɪdʒmənt]

Noun

encouragement (countable and uncountable, plural encouragements)

  1. The act of encouraging
  2. Something that incites, supports, promotes, protects or advances; incentive
    • 1904, Edward Verrall Lucas, Highways and Byways in Sussex Chapter 2
      even their arch-enemy the gamekeeper is beginning reluctantly, but gradually, to acquiesce in the general belief of their innocence and utility, I cannot help indulging the hope that this bird will eventually meet with that general encouragement and protection to which its eminent services so richly entitle it.
  3. Words or actions that increase someone’s confidence
    • 7 January 2017, Adharanand Finn writing in The Guardian, The 24-hour race: ‘It is a battle with your mind’
      Diana Celeiro has come all the way from Argentina for the race. It’s her second time here. Her husband, Gustavo, acts as her support crew. Most of the runners have someone who stands diligently by the track watching, offering encouragement, preparing snacks or helping with any issues that arise, from blisters to emotional breakdowns.
    • 1776, Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy, Chapter 4
      If I live, an’ please your honour, but once to get through it, I will never tell it again, quoth Trim, either to man, woman, or child–Poo–poo! said my uncle Toby–but with accents of such sweet encouragement did he utter it, that the corporal went on with his story with more alacrity than ever.
  4. The feeling of being encouraged

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:praise

Translations

References

encouragement in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.


French

Etymology

From encourager +‎ -ment.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.ku.ʁaʒ.mɑ̃/

Noun

encouragement m (plural encouragements)

  1. An encouragement

Further reading

  • “encouragement” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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