boost vs raise what difference

what is difference between boost and raise

English

Etymology

Of unknown origin. The verb is first recorded 1815; the noun, 1825. Compare Scots boost (to move; drive off; shoo away), bost, boast (to threaten; scold), Middle English boosten, bosten (to threaten).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buːst/
  • Rhymes: -uːst

Noun

boost (plural boosts)

  1. A push from behind, as to one who is endeavoring to climb.
  2. Something that helps, or adds power or effectiveness; assistance.
  3. (physics) A coordinate transformation that changes velocity.
  4. (automotive engineering) A positive intake manifold pressure in cars with turbochargers or superchargers.

Derived terms

  • battery booster
  • booster
  • boosterism

Translations

Verb

boost (third-person singular simple present boosts, present participle boosting, simple past and past participle boosted)

  1. (transitive) To lift or push from behind (one who is endeavoring to climb); to push up.
  2. (transitive, by extension) To help or encourage (something) to increase or improve; to assist in overcoming obstacles.
    This campaign will boost your chances of winning the election.
  3. (slang, transitive) To steal.
    • 1978, Harold J. Vetter, Ira J. Silverman, The Nature of Crime (page 296)
      It is not at all unusual or suspicious for a woman to spend a good deal of the day out shopping, and feminine clothing styles often make it relatively easy for a female shoplifter to conceal “boosted” merchandise on her person.
  4. (Canada, transitive) To jump-start a vehicle by using cables to connect the battery in a running vehicle to the battery in a vehicle that won’t start.
    • 1980, Popular Mechanics (volume 154, number 4, page 152)
      It’s easy to boost a dead battery, but this can be dangerous if it’s done the wrong way.
    • 2004, “Doug Mitchell”, how to connect for boost? (on newsgroup alt.autos.gm)
      If I want to use the charged Montana battery to boost my old Summit where do I connect the negative cable on the good battery of the Montana?
  5. (transitive, medicine) To give a booster shot to.
  6. (transitive, engineering) To amplify; to signal boost.

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Derived terms

  • overboost
  • upboost

Translations

Anagrams

  • Boots, boots, botos


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rāz, IPA(key): /ɹeɪz/
  • Homophones: rase, rays, raze, rehs, réis, res
  • Rhymes: -eɪz

Etymology 1

From Middle English reysen, raisen, reisen, from Old Norse reisa (to raise), from Proto-Germanic *raisijaną, *raizijaną (to raise), causative form of Proto-Germanic *rīsaną (to rise), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rey- (to rise, arise). Cognate with Old English rāsian (to explore, examine, research), Old English rīsan (to seize, carry off), Old English rǣran (to cause to rise, raise, rear, build, create). Doublet of rear.

Verb

raise (third-person singular simple present raises, present participle raising, simple past and past participle raised)

  1. (physical) To cause to rise; to lift or elevate.
    1. To form by the accumulation of materials or constituent parts; to build up; to erect.
    2. To cause something to come to the surface of the sea.
    3. (nautical) To cause (the land or any other object) to seem higher by drawing nearer to it.
    4. To make (bread, etc.) light, as by yeast or leaven.
    5. (figuratively) To cause (a dead person) to live again; to resurrect.
    6. (military) To remove or break up (a blockade), either by withdrawing the ships or forces employed in enforcing it, or by driving them away or dispersing them.
    7. (military, transitive) To relinquish (a siege), or cause this to be done.
  2. (transitive) To create, increase or develop.
    1. To collect or amass.
    2. To bring up; to grow; to promote.
    3. To mention (a question, issue) for discussion.
    4. (law) To create; to constitute (a use, or a beneficial interest in property).
    5. To bring into being; to produce; to cause to arise, come forth, or appear.
  3. To establish contact with (e.g., by telephone or radio).
  4. (poker, intransitive) To respond to a bet by increasing the amount required to continue in the hand.
  5. (arithmetic) To exponentiate, to involute.
  6. (linguistics, transitive, of a verb) To extract (a subject or other verb argument) out of an inner clause.
  7. (linguistics, transitive, of a vowel) To produce a vowel with the tongue positioned closer to the roof of the mouth.
  8. To increase the nominal value of (a cheque, money order, etc.) by fraudulently changing the writing or printing in which the sum payable is specified.
  9. (programming, transitive) To instantiate and transmit (an exception, by throwing it, or an event).
    • 2007, Bruce Bukovics, Pro WF: Windows Workflow in .NET 3.0 (page 243)
      Provide some mechanism in the local service class to raise the event. This might take the form of a public method that the host application can invoke to raise the event.
Usage notes
  • It is standard US English to raise children, and this usage has become common in all kinds of English since the 1700s. Until fairly recently, however, US teachers taught the traditional rule that one should raise crops and animals, but rear children, despite the fact that this contradicted general usage. It is therefore not surprising that some people still prefer “to rear children” and that this is considered correct but formal in US English. Modern British English also prefers “raise” over “rear”.
  • It is generally considered incorrect to say rear crops or (adult) animals in US English, but this expression is (or was until relatively recently) common in British English.
Synonyms
  • (to cause to rise): lift
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

raise (plural raises)

  1. (US) An increase in wages or salary; a rise (UK).
    The boss gave me a raise.
  2. (weightlifting) A shoulder exercise in which the arms are elevated against resistance.
  3. (curling) A shot in which the delivered stone bumps another stone forward.
  4. (poker) A bet that increases the previous bet.
Derived terms
  • lateral raise
  • leg raise
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hreysi; the spelling came about under the influence of the folk etymology that derived it from the verb.

Noun

raise (plural raises)

  1. A cairn or pile of stones.
Translations

Further reading

  • raise on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Aesir, Aries, ERISA, Resia, aesir, aires, arise, reais, serai

Middle English

Noun

raise

  1. Alternative form of reys

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