bootleg vs moonshine what difference

what is difference between bootleg and moonshine

English

Etymology

boot +‎ leg. Originally a nickname given to smugglers in King George III’s reign, derived from the smugglers’ custom of hiding packages of valuables in their large sea-boots when dodging the king’s coastguardsmen.

Verb

bootleg (third-person singular simple present bootlegs, present participle bootlegging, simple past and past participle bootlegged)

  1. (chiefly US, transitive) To make, transport and/or sell illegal alcoholic liquor.
  2. (transitive) To make, transport and/or sell an illegal version or copy of a copyrighted product.
  3. (intransitive) To engage in bootlegging.

Derived terms

  • bootlegger
  • bootlegging

Translations

Noun

bootleg (plural bootlegs)

  1. The part of a boot that is above the instep.
  2. An illegally produced, transported or sold product; contraband.
  3. (music) An unauthorized recording, e.g., of a live concert.
  4. (music) A remix or mashup that is a combination of two songs but that is not authorized and audited for copyright use; primarily in the electronic music scene.
  5. (American football) A play in which the quarterback fakes a handoff, conceals the ball against his hip, and rolls out.

Translations

Adjective

bootleg (not comparable)

  1. Illegally produced, transported or sold; pirated.

Translations

See also

  • bathtub gin
  • moonshine


English

Etymology

moon +‎ shine. Illegally distilled liquor is so named because its manufacture may be conducted without artificial light at night-time.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmuːnʃaɪn/
  • Hyphenation: moon‧shine

Noun

moonshine (countable and uncountable, plural moonshines)

  1. (literally) The light of the moon.
    Synonyms: moonlight, moonbeam
    • 1718, John Gay, “O ruddier than the Cherry”, from Act 2 of George Frideric Handel’s opera Acis and Galatea, page 47:
      […] O Nymph more bright than moon-ſhine night, like Kidlings blithe and merry […]
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Lyrical Ballads, Part I, page 10:
      In mist or cloud on mast or shroud / It perch’d for vespers nine, / Whiles all the night thro’ fog smoke-white / Glimmer’d the white moon-shine.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night:
      So I came forth of the sea and sat down on the edge of an island in the moonshine, where a passer-by found me and, carrying me to the his house, besought me of love-liesse; but I smote him on the head, so that he all but died; whereupon he carried me forth and sold me to the merchant from whom thou hadst me, […]
    • 1908, Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables, Chapter 2,[2]
      “[…] it would be lovely to sleep in a wild cherry-tree all white with bloom in the moonshine, don’t you think? […]”
  2. (informal) High-proof alcohol (especially whiskey) that is often, but not always, produced illegally.
    Synonyms: bathtub gin, bootleg, corn liquor, hooch, mountain dew, white lightning, coon-dick, coondick
    • 1920, Peter B. Kyne, The Understanding Heart, Chapter IV
      “Wish I’d been more polite to that girl,” the sheriff remarked regretfully. […] I know she’d have give me another drink of that old moonshine she has.”
  3. (colloquial) Nonsense.
  4. (mathematics) A branch of pure mathematics relating the Monster group to an invariant of elliptic functions.
  5. (US, cooking) A spiced dish of eggs and fried onions.
  6. (obsolete) A month.

Derived terms

  • eggs in moonshine
  • Mathieu moonshine
  • monstrous moonshine
  • moonshiney, moonshiny
  • umbral moonshine

Translations

Further reading

  • moonshine at OneLook Dictionary Search

Portuguese

Noun

moonshine m (uncountable)

  1. (rare) moonshine (Appalachian home-made liquor)

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