booze vs drink what difference

what is difference between booze and drink

English

Etymology

Alteration of bowse.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bo͞oz, IPA(key): /buːz/
  • Homophone: boos
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Noun

booze (countable and uncountable, plural boozes)

  1. (colloquial, uncountable) Any alcoholic beverage.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      The glutton castaway, the drunkard in the desert, the lecher in prison, they are the happy ones. To hunger, thirst, lust, every day afresh and every day in vain, after the old prog, the old booze, the old whores, that’s the nearest we’ll ever get to felicity, the new porch and the very latest garden.
    • 1995, Al Stewart, “Marion the Chatelaine” on Between the Wars:
      She got caught between the shadows and the booze
      And she surely did know how to have the blues
  2. (colloquial, countable, archaic) A session of drinking alcohol; a drinking party.

Synonyms

  • grog; see also Thesaurus:alcoholic beverage

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • piss
  • plonk

Verb

booze (third-person singular simple present boozes, present participle boozing, simple past and past participle boozed)

  1. (slang) To drink alcohol.
    • 1884, Hugh Reginald Haweis, My Musical Life
      This is better than boozing in public houses.

Translations



English

Alternative forms

  • dhrink (pronunciation spelling, imitating an Irish accent)
  • drank (slang)
  • drinck, drinke (obsolete)
  • thrink (pronunciation spelling)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: drĭngk, IPA(key): /dɹɪŋk/, [dʒɹɪŋk], [d̠ɹ̠˔ʷɪŋk]
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Etymology 1

From Middle English drynken, from Old English drincan (to drink, swallow up, engulf), from Proto-Germanic *drinkaną (to drink), of uncertain origin; possibly from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrenǵ- (to draw into one’s mouth, sip, gulp), nasalised variant of *dʰreǵ- (to draw, glide). Cognate with West Frisian drinke (to drink), Low German drinken (to drink), Dutch drinken (to drink), German trinken (to drink), Danish and Norwegian Bokmål drikke (to drink), Norwegian Nynorsk drikka (to drink).

Verb

drink (third-person singular simple present drinks, present participle drinking, simple past drank or (southern US) drunk or (nonstandard) drinked, past participle drunk or (obsolete or informal) drank or (nonstandard) drinked or (obsolete or dialectal) drunken or (obsolete or nonstandard) dranken)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To consume (a liquid) through the mouth.
  2. (transitive, metonymically) To consume the liquid contained within (a bottle, glass, etc.).
  3. (intransitive) To consume alcoholic beverages.
    • 1852, William Makepeace Thackeray, The History of Henry Esmond
      Bolingbroke always spoke freely when he had drunk freely.
  4. (transitive) To take in (a liquid), in any manner; to suck up; to absorb; to imbibe.
    • , IV
      Let the purple violets drink the stream.
  5. (transitive) To take in; to receive within one, through the senses; to inhale; to hear; to see.
    • to drink the cooler air
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To smoke, as tobacco.
    • 1630, John Taylor, A Proclomation or approbation from the King of execration, to euery nation, for Tobaccoes propogration
      And some men now live ninety yeeres and past, / Who never dranke tobacco first nor last.
Synonyms
  • (consume (liquid) through the mouth): gulp, imbibe, quaff, sip, see also Thesaurus:drink
  • (consume alcoholic beverages): drink alcohol, hit the sauce
Derived terms
Related terms
  • drunken, drunk, dranken
Descendants
  • Aukan: diingi
  • Chinese Pidgin English: drinkee, dlinkee
  • Sranan Tongo: dringi
  • Tok Pisin: dringim
  • Esperanto: drinki
  • Ido: drinkar
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English drink, drinke (also as drinche, drunch), from Old English drynċ, from Proto-Germanic *drunkiz, *drankiz. Compare Dutch drank.

Noun

drink (countable and uncountable, plural drinks)

  1. A beverage.
  2. (uncountable) Drinks in general; something to drink
  3. A type of beverage (usually mixed).
  4. A (served) alcoholic beverage.
  5. The action of drinking, especially with the verbs take or have.
  6. Alcoholic beverages in general.
  7. (colloquial, with the) Any body of water.
Usage notes
  • A plainer term than more elevated term beverage. Beverage is of French origin, while drink is of Old English origin, and this stylistic difference by origin is common; see list of English words with dual French and Anglo-Saxon variations.
  • In the sense of any body of water the term is often associated with (a threat of) drowning.
Synonyms
  • (served beverage): beverage, see also Thesaurus:beverage
  • (served alcoholic beverage): beverage, see also Thesaurus:alcoholic beverage
  • (action of drinking): gulp, sip, swig
  • (type of beverage): beverage
  • (alcoholic beverages in general): alcohol
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch drinken, from Middle Dutch drinken, from Old Dutch drinkan, from Proto-Germanic *drinkaną.

Verb

drink (present drink, present participle drinkende, past participle gedrink)

  1. to drink

Czech

Etymology

From English drink.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈdrɪŋk]

Noun

drink m inan

  1. drink (a (mixed) alcoholic beverage)

Declension

Further reading

  • drink in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • drink in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

From English drink.

Noun

drink c (singular definite drinken, plural indefinite drinks)

  1. drink; a (mixed) alcoholic beverage

Inflection

Synonyms

  • sjus c

Further reading

  • “drink” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /drɪŋk/
  • Hyphenation: drink
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English drink.

Noun

drink m (plural drinks)

  1. (Belgium) A social event were beverages are served, with or without snacks, e.g. as a celebration.
  2. (Netherlands) A beverage, a drink.

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

drink

  1. first-person singular present indicative of drinken
  2. imperative of drinken

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English drink.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʁiŋk/

Noun

drink m (plural drinks)

  1. a reception or afterparty where alcohol is served

Further reading

  • “drink” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From English drink.

Noun

drink m (invariable)

  1. drink (served beverage and mixed beverage)
    Synonym: bevanda

Further reading

  • drink on the Italian Wikipedia.Wikipedia it

Low German

Verb

drink

  1. first-person singular of drinken

Polish

Etymology

From English drink.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /drʲink/

Noun

drink m inan

  1. cocktail (served alcoholic beverage)

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verb) drinkować

Further reading

  • drink in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • drink in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Noun

drink m (plural drinks)

  1. Alternative form of drinque

Swedish

Etymology

From English drink

Pronunciation

Noun

drink c

  1. drink; a (mixed) alcoholic beverage

Declension

Related terms

  • drinkare

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