booze vs liquor what difference

what is difference between booze and liquor

English

Etymology

Alteration of bowse.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bo͞oz, IPA(key): /buːz/
  • Homophone: boos
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Noun

booze (countable and uncountable, plural boozes)

  1. (colloquial, uncountable) Any alcoholic beverage.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      The glutton castaway, the drunkard in the desert, the lecher in prison, they are the happy ones. To hunger, thirst, lust, every day afresh and every day in vain, after the old prog, the old booze, the old whores, that’s the nearest we’ll ever get to felicity, the new porch and the very latest garden.
    • 1995, Al Stewart, “Marion the Chatelaine” on Between the Wars:
      She got caught between the shadows and the booze
      And she surely did know how to have the blues
  2. (colloquial, countable, archaic) A session of drinking alcohol; a drinking party.

Synonyms

  • grog; see also Thesaurus:alcoholic beverage

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • piss
  • plonk

Verb

booze (third-person singular simple present boozes, present participle boozing, simple past and past participle boozed)

  1. (slang) To drink alcohol.
    • 1884, Hugh Reginald Haweis, My Musical Life
      This is better than boozing in public houses.

Translations



English

Alternative forms

  • liquour (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English licour, from Anglo-Norman licour, from Latin liquor (fluidity, liquidness, a fluid, a liquid), from liquere (to be fluid or liquid); see liquid. Doublet of liqueur.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈlɪk.ə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈlɪk.ɚ/
  • Homophone: licker
  • Rhymes: -ɪkə(ɹ)

Noun

liquor (countable and uncountable, plural liquors)

  1. (obsolete) A liquid, a fluid.
    • 1665, Robert Hooke, Micrographia:
      Thus Water also, or any other Liquor, included in a convenient vessel, by being warmed, manifestly expands it self with a very great violence []
  2. (obsolete) A drinkable liquid.
  3. A liquid obtained by cooking meat or vegetables (or both).
  4. (Britain, cooking) A parsley sauce commonly served with traditional pies and mash.
  5. (chiefly US) Strong alcoholic drink derived from fermentation and distillation; more broadly, any alcoholic drink.
  6. In process industry, a liquid in which a desired reaction takes place, e.g. pulping liquor is a mixture of chemicals and water which breaks wood into its components, thus facilitating the extraction of cellulose.
  7. A liquid in which something has been steeped.

Synonyms

  • (strong alcoholic drink): spirits (British and Australasian English)
  • (liquid obtained by cooking food): stock, pot liquor (American English), broth, bouillon

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

liquor (third-person singular simple present liquors, present participle liquoring, simple past and past participle liquored)

  1. (intransitive) To drink liquor, usually to excess.
  2. (transitive) To cause someone to drink liquor, usually to excess.
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To grease.
    • cart-wheels squeak not when they are liquored

Derived terms

  • liquored up

References

  • liquor in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • liquor in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Latin

Etymology 1

From liqueō (I am liquid, fluid)

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈli.kʷor/, [ˈlʲɪkʷɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈli.kwor/, [ˈliːkwɔr]

Noun

liquor m (genitive liquōris); third declension

  1. fluidity, liquidity
  2. a liquid, fluid
Declension

Third-declension noun.

Related terms
Descendants
  • Russian: ликёр (likjór)
  • Spanish: licor m
  • Italian: liquore

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈliː.kʷor/, [ˈlʲiːkʷɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈli.kwor/, [ˈliːkwɔr]

Verb

līquor (present infinitive līquī); third conjugation, deponent, no perfect or supine stem

  1. (intransitive) to be fluid or liquid
  2. (intransitive) to flow
  3. (intransitive) to melt, dissolve
Conjugation

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈli.kʷor/, [ˈlʲɪkʷɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈli.kwor/, [ˈliːkwɔr]

Verb

liquor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of liquō

References

  • līquor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lĭquor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • liquor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • liquor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • liquor in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

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