border vs margin what difference

what is difference between border and margin

English

Etymology

Inherited from Middle English bordure, from Old French bordeure, of Germanic origin, from Frankish *bord, equivalent to modern French bord (a border) + -er.

Akin to Middle High German borte (border, trim), German Borte (ribbon, trimming). Doublet of bordure. More at board.

Pronunciation

  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈbɔədə/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɔːdə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbɔɹdɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)də(ɹ)
  • Homophone: boarder (accents with the horse-hoarse merger)

Noun

border (countable and uncountable, plural borders)

  1. The line or frontier area separating political or geographical regions.
    • 2013, Nicholas Watt and Nick Hopkins, Afghanistan bomb: UK to ‘look carefully’ at use of vehicles(in The Guardian, 1 May 2013)
      The Ministry of Defence said on Wednesday the men had been killed on Tuesday in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand province, on the border of Kandahar just north of the provincial capital Lashkar Gah.
    • 23 June 2018, Mattha Busb, The Independent, Jogger crosses US-Canada border by mistake, is held for two weeks in detention centre
      A French tourist who accidentally crossed the border into the US from Canada during an evening jog was sent to a detention centre 125 miles away and held for two weeks until she was released.
  2. The outer edge of something.
    the borders of the garden
    • 1843, Jeremy Bentham, Principles of Morals and Legislation, Fragment on Government, Civil Code, Penal Law
      upon the borders of these solitudes
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, The Danger and Mischief of Delaying Reptentance (sermon)
      in the borders of death
  3. A decorative strip around the edge of something.
  4. A strip of ground in which ornamental plants are grown.
  5. (Britain, uncountable) border morris or border dancing; a vigorous style of traditional English dance originating from villages along the border between England and Wales, performed by a team of dancers usually with their faces disguised with black makeup.
  6. (computing) A string that is both a prefix and a suffix of another particular string.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

border (third-person singular simple present borders, present participle bordering, simple past and past participle bordered)

  1. (transitive) To put a border on something.
  2. (transitive) To form a border around; to bound.
  3. (transitive) To lie on, or adjacent to, a border of.
    Denmark borders Germany to the south.
  4. (intransitive) To touch at a border (with on, upon, or with).
    Connecticut borders on Massachusetts.
  5. (intransitive) To approach; to come near to; to verge (with on or upon).
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Folly of Scoffing at Religion
      Wit which borders upon profaneness [] deserves to be branded as folly.

Derived terms

  • border on
  • cross-border

Translations

Anagrams

  • roberd

French

Etymology

From bord +‎ -er, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔʁ.de/

Verb

border

  1. to border (add a border to)
  2. to border (share a border with)
  3. to tuck in

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • avoir le cul bordé de nouilles

Further reading

  • “border” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • broder, rebord

Middle English

Noun

border

  1. Alternative form of bourdour

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

  • bord

Noun

border n

  1. indefinite plural of bord

Etymology 2

Noun

border m

  1. indefinite plural of bord


English

Etymology

From Middle English margyne, margine, from Latin marginem (possibly via Old French margin), accusative of margō (edge, brink, border, margin). Doublet of marge and margo.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmɑːdʒɪn/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈmɑːɹdʒ(ə)n/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)dʒɪn

Noun

margin (plural margins)

  1. (typography) The edge of the paper, typically left blank when printing but sometimes used for annotations etc.
  2. The edge or border of any flat surface.
  3. (figuratively) The edge defining inclusion in or exclusion from a set or group.
    • 1999, Pierre François, Inlets of the Soul: Contemporary Fiction in English and the Myth of the Fall, page 186,
      As far as space is concerned, Mary Lamb finds herself at the farthest margin of society – among tramps – when the novel begins.
  4. A difference or ratio between results, characteristics, scores.
    margin of victory
  5. A permissible difference; allowing some freedom to move within limits.
  6. (finance) The yield or profit; the selling price minus the cost of production.
  7. (finance) Collateral security deposited with a broker, to compensate the broker in the event of loss in the speculative buying and selling of stocks, commodities, etc.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of N. Biddle to this entry?)
  8. That which is ancillary; periphery.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

margin (third-person singular simple present margins, present participle margining, simple past and past participle margined)

  1. (transitive) To add a margin to.
  2. (transitive) To enter (notes etc.) into the margin.

Further reading

  • margin in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • margin in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Ingram, Maring, arming, raming

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin margo

Noun

margin m (definite singular marginen, indefinite plural marginer, definite plural marginene)

  1. a margin (most senses)

Synonyms

  • marg

Derived terms

  • feilmargin

References

  • “margin” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin margo

Noun

margin m (definite singular marginen, indefinite plural marginar, definite plural marginane)

  1. a margin (most senses)

Synonyms

  • marg

Derived terms

  • feilmargin

References

  • “margin” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

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