border vs ring what difference

what is difference between border and ring

English

Etymology

Inherited from Middle English bordure, from Old French bordeure, of Germanic origin, from Frankish *bord, equivalent to modern French bord (a border) + -er.

Akin to Middle High German borte (border, trim), German Borte (ribbon, trimming). Doublet of bordure. More at board.

Pronunciation

  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈbɔədə/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɔːdə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbɔɹdɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)də(ɹ)
  • Homophone: boarder (accents with the horse-hoarse merger)

Noun

border (countable and uncountable, plural borders)

  1. The line or frontier area separating political or geographical regions.
    • 2013, Nicholas Watt and Nick Hopkins, Afghanistan bomb: UK to ‘look carefully’ at use of vehicles(in The Guardian, 1 May 2013)
      The Ministry of Defence said on Wednesday the men had been killed on Tuesday in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand province, on the border of Kandahar just north of the provincial capital Lashkar Gah.
    • 23 June 2018, Mattha Busb, The Independent, Jogger crosses US-Canada border by mistake, is held for two weeks in detention centre
      A French tourist who accidentally crossed the border into the US from Canada during an evening jog was sent to a detention centre 125 miles away and held for two weeks until she was released.
  2. The outer edge of something.
    the borders of the garden
    • 1843, Jeremy Bentham, Principles of Morals and Legislation, Fragment on Government, Civil Code, Penal Law
      upon the borders of these solitudes
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, The Danger and Mischief of Delaying Reptentance (sermon)
      in the borders of death
  3. A decorative strip around the edge of something.
  4. A strip of ground in which ornamental plants are grown.
  5. (Britain, uncountable) border morris or border dancing; a vigorous style of traditional English dance originating from villages along the border between England and Wales, performed by a team of dancers usually with their faces disguised with black makeup.
  6. (computing) A string that is both a prefix and a suffix of another particular string.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

border (third-person singular simple present borders, present participle bordering, simple past and past participle bordered)

  1. (transitive) To put a border on something.
  2. (transitive) To form a border around; to bound.
  3. (transitive) To lie on, or adjacent to, a border of.
    Denmark borders Germany to the south.
  4. (intransitive) To touch at a border (with on, upon, or with).
    Connecticut borders on Massachusetts.
  5. (intransitive) To approach; to come near to; to verge (with on or upon).
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Folly of Scoffing at Religion
      Wit which borders upon profaneness [] deserves to be branded as folly.

Derived terms

  • border on
  • cross-border

Translations

Anagrams

  • roberd

French

Etymology

From bord +‎ -er, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔʁ.de/

Verb

border

  1. to border (add a border to)
  2. to border (share a border with)
  3. to tuck in

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • avoir le cul bordé de nouilles

Further reading

  • “border” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • broder, rebord

Middle English

Noun

border

  1. Alternative form of bourdour

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

  • bord

Noun

border n

  1. indefinite plural of bord

Etymology 2

Noun

border m

  1. indefinite plural of bord


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rĭng, IPA(key): /ɹɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ
  • Homophone: wring

Etymology 1

From Middle English ring, from Old English hring (ring, circle), from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (ring), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)krengʰ-, extended nasalized form of *(s)ker- (to turn, bend). Cognate with West Frisian ring, Low German Ring, Dutch ring, German Ring, Swedish ring, also Finnish rengas. Doublet of rink.

Noun

ring (plural rings)

  1. (physical) A solid object in the shape of a circle.
    1. A circumscribing object, (roughly) circular and hollow, looking like an annual ring, earring, finger ring etc.
      Synonyms: annulus, hoop, torus
    2. A round piece of (precious) metal worn around the finger or through the ear, nose, etc.
    3. (Britain) A bird band, a round piece of metal put around a bird’s leg used for identification and studies of migration.
    4. (Britain) A burner on a kitchen stove.
    5. In a jack plug, the connector between the tip and the sleeve.
    6. (historical) An instrument, formerly used for taking the sun’s altitude, consisting of a brass ring suspended by a swivel, with a hole at one side through which a solar ray entering indicated the altitude on the graduated inner surface opposite.
    7. (botany) A flexible band partly or wholly encircling the spore cases of ferns.
  2. (physical) A group of objects arranged in a circle.
    1. A circular group of people or objects.
    2. (astronomy) A formation of various pieces of material orbiting around a planet or young star.
    3. (Britain) A large circular prehistoric stone construction such as Stonehenge.
  3. A piece of food in the shape of a ring.
  4. A place where some sports or exhibitions take place; notably a circular or comparable arena, such as a boxing ring or a circus ring; hence the field of a political contest.
    • 1707, Edmund Smith, Phaedra and Hippolitus
      Place me, O, place me in the dusty ring, / Where youthful charioteers contend for glory.
    1. The open space in front of a racecourse stand, used for betting purposes.
  5. An exclusive group of people, usually involving some unethical or illegal practices.
    • 1877, Edward Augustus Freeman, The History of the Norman Conquest of England
      the ruling ring at Constantinople
    • 1928, Upton Sinclair, Boston
      It’s a blackmail ring, and the district attorneys get a share of the loot.
  6. (chemistry) A group of atoms linked by bonds to form a closed chain in a molecule.
  7. (geometry) A planar geometrical figure included between two concentric circles.
  8. (typography) A diacritical mark in the shape of a hollow circle placed above or under the letter; a kroužek.
  9. (historical) An old English measure of corn equal to the coomb or half a quarter.
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 1, page 168.
      The ring is common in the Huntingdonshire accounts of Ramsey Abbey. It was equal to half a quarter, i.e., is identical with the coomb of the eastern counties
  10. (computing theory) A hierarchical level of privilege in a computer system, usually at hardware level, used to protect data and functionality (also protection ring).
    • 2007, Steve Anson, Steve Bunting, Mastering Windows Network Forensics and Investigation (page 70)
      Kernel Mode processes run in ring 0, and User Mode processes run in ring 3.
  11. (firearms) Either of the pair of clamps used to hold a telescopic sight to a rifle.
  12. (cartomancy) The twenty-fifth Lenormand card.
Derived terms
Translations
Gallery

Verb

ring (third-person singular simple present rings, present participle ringing, simple past and past participle ringed)

  1. (transitive) To enclose or surround.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To make an incision around; to girdle.
  3. (transitive) To attach a ring to, especially for identification.
    • 1919, Popular Science (volume 95, number 4, page 31)
      Ringing a pig of ordinary size is easy, but special arrangements must be made for handling the big ones.
  4. (transitive) To surround or fit with a ring, or as if with a ring.
  5. (falconry) To rise in the air spirally.
  6. (transitive) To steal and change the identity of (cars) in order to resell them.
    • A. Woodley, Trio: 3 short stories
      Gabe said that as Derry had only caught part of the conversation, it’s possible that they were discussing a film, it was bad enough that they’d unwittingly been brought into ringing cars, adding drugs into it was far more than either of them could ever be comfortable with.
    • 2019 (10 December), Ross McCarthy, Digbeth chop shop gang jailed over £2m stolen car racket (in Birmingham Live) [2]
      They used two bases in Digbeth to break down luxury motors, some of which were carjacked or stolen after keys were taken in house raids. The parts were then fitted to salvaged cars bought online. [] Jailing the quartet, a judge at Birmingham Crown Court said it was a “car ringing on a commercial and substantial scale”.
Derived terms
  • ringer
  • ring-fence, ringfence
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English ringen, from Old English hrinġan (to ring), from Proto-Germanic *hringijaną. Cognate with Dutch ringen, Swedish ringa.

Noun

ring (plural rings)

  1. The resonant sound of a bell, or a sound resembling it.
  2. (figuratively) A pleasant or correct sound.
  3. (figuratively) A sound or appearance that is characteristic of something.
  4. (colloquial) A telephone call.
  5. Any loud sound; the sound of numerous voices; a sound continued, repeated, or reverberated.
    • the ring of acclamations fresh in his ears
  6. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.
    • as great and tunable a ring of bells as any in the world
Derived terms
  • give a ring
  • ringtone
  • ringback
Translations

Verb

ring (third-person singular simple present rings, present participle ringing, simple past rang or (nonstandard) rung, past participle rung)

  1. (intransitive) Of a bell, etc., to produce a resonant sound.
  2. (transitive) To make (a bell, etc.) produce a resonant sound.
  3. (transitive) To produce (a sound) by ringing.
    They rang a Christmas carol on their handbells.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To produce the sound of a bell or a similar sound.
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) Of something spoken or written, to appear to be, to seem, to sound.
  6. (transitive, colloquial, Britain, Australia, New Zealand) To telephone (someone).
  7. (intransitive) to resound, reverberate, echo.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      So he spoke, and it seemed there was a little halting at first, as of men not liking to take Blackbeard’s name in Blackbeard’s place, or raise the Devil by mocking at him. But then some of the bolder shouted ‘Blackbeard’, and so the more timid chimed in, and in a minute there were a score of voices calling ‘Blackbeard, Blackbeard’, till the place rang again.
    • 1919, Boris Sidis, The Source and Aim of Human Progress:
      It is instructive for us to learn as well as to ponder on the fact that “the very men who looked down with delight, when the sand of the arena reddened with human blood, made the arena ring with applause when Terence in his famous line: ‘Homo sum, Nihil humani alienum puto’ proclaimed the brotherhood of man.”
  8. (intransitive) To produce music with bells.
    • 1669, William Holder, Elements of Speech
      Four Bells admit Twenty-four changes in Ringing
  9. (dated) To repeat often, loudly, or earnestly.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From a shortening of German Zahlring (number(s) ring) (coined by German mathematician David Hilbert in 1892). Apparently first used in English in 1930, E. T. Bell, “Rings whose elements are ideals,” Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society.

Noun

ring (plural rings)

  1. (algebra) An algebraic structure which consists of a set with two binary operations: an additive operation and a multiplicative operation, such that the set is an abelian group under the additive operation, a monoid under the multiplicative operation, and such that the multiplicative operation is distributive with respect to the additive operation.
  2. (algebra) An algebraic structure as above, but only required to be a semigroup under the multiplicative operation, that is, there need not be a multiplicative identity element.
Hypernyms
  • pseudo-ring
  • semiring
Hyponyms
  • algebra over a field
  • commutative ring
    • integral domain
      • unique factorization domain, Noetherian domain
        • principal ideal domain
          • Euclidean domain
            • field
Meronyms
  • group of units
  • ideal
Derived terms
  • Boolean ring
  • polynomial ring
Translations

Etymology 4

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

ring (plural rings)

  1. (mathematical analysis, measure theory) A family of sets that is closed under finite unions and differences.
Hyponyms
  • algebra (of sets)
  • σ-ring
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • NGRI, girn, grin

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch ring, from Middle Dutch rinc, from Old Dutch ring, from Proto-West Germanic *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rəŋ/

Noun

ring (plural ringe)

  1. ring, hollow circular object

Atong (India)

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.).

Noun

ring

  1. taro

References

  • van Breugel, Seino. 2015. Atong-English dictionary, second edition. Available online: https://www.academia.edu/487044/Atong_English_Dictionary.

Balinese

Preposition

ring

  1. in, at (basa alus)
    Synonym: di (basa biasa)

Cimbrian

Adjective

ring

  1. (of weight) light

References

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɪŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk
  • Homophone: rynk

Noun

ring m inan

  1. ring (place where some sports take place; boxing ring and similar)

Declension

Further reading

  • ring in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ring in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /renɡ/, [ʁæŋˀ]

Noun

ring c (singular definite ringen, plural indefinite ringe)

  1. ring
  2. circle
  3. halo
  4. hoop
  5. coil
Inflection
Derived terms
  • vielsesring

Etymology 2

Verbal noun to ringe (to ring).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /renɡ/, [ʁæŋˀ]

Noun

ring n (singular definite ringet, plural indefinite ring)

  1. (archaic) ring (the resonant sound of a bell, a telephone call)
Inflection

Etymology 3

See ringe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /renɡ/, [ʁæŋˀ]

Verb

ring

  1. imperative of ringe

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch rinc, from Old Dutch ring, from Proto-West Germanic *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rɪŋ/
  • Hyphenation: ring
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ

Noun

ring m (plural ringen, diminutive ringetje n)

  1. ring, hollow circular object
  2. (gymnastics) ring
  3. beltway, ring road

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: ring
  • Negerhollands: rink, riṅ
  • Indonesian: ring
  • Papiamentu: renchi, ringtsje (from the diminutive)

See also

  • kring

Estonian

Etymology

From Middle Low German rink. Compare German Ring. See also rõngas.

Noun

ring (genitive ringi, partitive ringi)

  1. circle

Declension

See also

  • rõngas

French

Etymology

From English ring (sense 1) and Dutch ring (sense 2).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁiŋɡ/

Noun

ring m (plural rings)

  1. (sports, chiefly combat sports) ring
  2. (Belgium) ring road, beltway

Derived terms

  • ring de boxe

Further reading

  • “ring” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Garo

Noun

ring

  1. boat

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʁɪŋ]

Verb

ring

  1. singular imperative of ringen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of ringen

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈriŋɡ]
  • Hyphenation: ring
  • Rhymes: -iŋɡ

Etymology 1

From an onomatopoeic (sound-imitative) root + -g (frequentative suffix).

Verb

ring

  1. (intransitive) to swing, to rock
    Synonyms: billeg, inog, ingadozik, himbálózik, himbálódzik
  2. (intransitive, of a ship) to sway, to roll
    Synonyms: ringatózik, ringatódzik, dülöng, dülöngél, himbálódzik, himbálózik

Conjugation

or

Derived terms
  • ringat

Etymology 2

From English ring.

Noun

ring (plural ringek)

  1. (dated, boxing) ring, boxing ring (space in which a boxing match is contested)
    Synonym: szorító
Declension

References

Further reading

  • (to roll, sway, swing): ring in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (boxing ring): ring in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (in economy, cf. cartel): ring in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Indonesian

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɪŋ]
  • Hyphenation: ring

Noun

ring (first-person possessive ringku, second-person possessive ringmu, third-person possessive ringnya)

  1. (onomatopoeia) sound of bell.

Etymology 2

From Dutch ring, from Middle Dutch rinc, from Old Dutch ring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz. Doublet of langsir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɪŋ]
  • Hyphenation: ring

Noun

ring

  1. ring,
    1. a circumscribing object, (roughly) circular and hollow, looking like an annual ring, earring, finger ring etc.
      Synonyms: cincin, gelang
    2. boxing ring.
  2. (colloquial) circle
    Synonym: lingkaran

Further reading

  • “ring” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun

ring m (definite singular ringen, indefinite plural ringer, definite plural ringene)

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

ring

  1. imperative of ringe

References

  • “ring” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun

ring m (definite singular ringen, indefinite plural ringar, definite plural ringane)

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place

Derived terms

Verb

ring

  1. imperative of ringja, ringje, ringa and ringe

References

  • “ring” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun

ring m

  1. ring, circle

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: rinc
    • Dutch: ring
      • Afrikaans: ring
      • Negerhollands: rink, riṅ
      • Indonesian: ring
      • Papiamentu: renchi, ringtsje (from the diminutive)
    • Limburgish: rink

Further reading

  • “rink”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun

ring m

  1. ring (object in the shape of a circle)

Descendants

  • Middle High German: rinc, ring
    • German: Ring
    • Luxembourgish: Rank
    • Yiddish: רינג(ring)

Polish

Etymology

From English ring, from Middle English ring, from Old English hring (ring, circle), from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (ring), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)krengʰ-, extended nasalized form of *(s)ker- (to turn, bend). Doublet of rynek (market, marketplace).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rʲink/

Noun

ring m inan

  1. (boxing) boxing ring

Declension

Derived terms

  • (adjective) ringowy

Further reading

  • ring in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ring in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Noun

ring m (plural rings)

  1. Alternative form of ringue

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From English ring.

Noun

rȉng m (Cyrillic spelling ри̏нг)

  1. the ring (place where some sports take place; boxing ring and similar)

Declension

This entry needs an inflection-table template.


Spanish

Etymology

From English ring. Doublet of rancho.

Noun

ring m (plural rings)

  1. (boxing) ring

Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish ringer, from Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun

ring c

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place
  3. (mathematics) A ring, algebraic structure
  4. (mathematics) A ring, planar geometrical figure
  5. (astronomy) A ring, collection of material orbiting some planets
  6. Each of the (usually three) years in a Swedish gymnasium (highschool)
Declension
Derived terms
  • vigselring

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

ring

  1. imperative of ringa.

West Frisian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

ring c (plural ringen, diminutive rinkje)

  1. ring, circle
  2. ring (jewelry)

Derived terms

  • ringje
  • earring

Further reading

  • “ring”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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