bore vs calibre what difference

what is difference between bore and calibre

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɔɹ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɔː/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /bo(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /boə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophones: boar, Bohr, boor (accents with the pour–poor merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English boren, from Old English borian (to pierce), from Proto-Germanic *burōną. Compare Danish bore, Norwegian Bokmål bore, Dutch boren, German bohren, Old Norse bora. Cognate with Latin forō (to bore, to pierce), Latin feriō (strike, cut) and Albanian birë (hole). Sense of wearying may come from a figurative use such as “to bore the ears”; compare German drillen.

Verb

bore (third-person singular simple present bores, present participle boring, simple past and past participle bored)

  1. (transitive) To inspire boredom in somebody.
    • 1881, Thomas Carlyle, Reminiscences
      [] used to come and bore me at rare intervals.
  2. (transitive) To make a hole through something.
  3. (intransitive) To make a hole with, or as if with, a boring instrument; to cut a circular hole by the rotary motion of a tool.
  4. (transitive) To form or enlarge (something) by means of a boring instrument or apparatus.
    • 1862, Thaddeus William Harris, A Treatise on Some of the Insects Injurious to Vegetation
      short but very powerful jaws, by means whereof the insect can bore [] a cylindrical passage through the most solid wood
  5. (transitive) To make (a passage) by laborious effort, as in boring; to force a narrow and difficult passage through.
  6. (intransitive) To be pierced or penetrated by an instrument that cuts as it turns.
  7. (intransitive) To push forward in a certain direction with laborious effort.
    • They take their flight [] boring to the west.
  8. (of a horse) To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Crabb to this entry?)
  9. (obsolete) To fool; to trick.
Synonyms
  • (make a hole through something): see also Thesaurus:make a hole
Antonyms
  • interest
Related terms
  • (to make a hole): borer
  • (to inspire boredom): bored, boredom, boring
Translations

Noun

bore (plural bores)

  1. A hole drilled or milled through something, or (by extension) its diameter.
  2. The tunnel inside of a gun’s barrel through which the bullet travels when fired, or (by extension) its diameter.
  3. A tool, such as an auger, for making a hole by boring.
  4. A capped well drilled to tap artesian water. The place where the well exists.
  5. One who inspires boredom or lack of interest; an uninteresting person.
  6. Something dull or uninteresting
    • 1871, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Passages from the French and Italian Notebooks
      It is as great a bore as to hear a poet read his own verses.
  7. Calibre; importance.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:bore
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English *bore, bare, a borrowing from Old Norse bára (billow, wave). Cognate with Icelandic bára, Faroese bára.

Noun

bore (plural bores)

  1. A sudden and rapid flow of tide occuring in certain rivers and estuaries which rolls up as a wave.
Synonyms
  • eagre
Translations

Etymology 3

Verb

bore

  1. simple past tense of bear
  2. (now colloquial, nonstandard) past participle of bear

Anagrams

  • Bero, Boer, Ebor, Ebro, robe

Cornish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *bāregos (morning). Compare Breton beure, Old Irish báireach and Old Irish bárach, whence i mbáireach and i mbárach (tomorrow), modern Irish amáireach (Munster, Connaught) and Irish amárach (Donegal).

Noun

bore m

  1. morning

Mutation


Czech

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /borɛ/
  • Rhymes: -orɛ
  • Hyphenation: bo‧re

Noun

bore

  1. vocative singular of bor (“pine wood”):

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /boːrɛ/
  • Rhymes: -oːrɛ
  • Hyphenation: bo‧re

Noun

bore

  1. vocative singular of bor (“boron”):

Anagrams

  • oreb, robe

References


Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

bore

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of boren

Anagrams

  • boer, Ebro, robe, ober

French

Etymology

Coined by Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac and Louis Jacques Thénard in 1808, from the same root but independently of English boron.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔʁ/

Noun

bore m (uncountable)

  1. boron

Further reading

  • “bore” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • orbe, robe, robé

Middle English

Etymology 1

A back-formation from boren; reinforced by Old Norse bora.

Alternative forms

  • boore

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔːr(ə)/

Noun

bore (plural bores)

  1. A bore, hole, puncture or indentation.
  2. A gap, cavity or piercing.
  3. (rare, euphemistic) The anus; the asshole.
Descendants
  • English: bore
  • Scots: bore, boir
References
  • “bōre, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-22.

Etymology 2

Verb

bore

  1. Alternative form of boryn

Etymology 3

Noun

bore

  1. Alternative form of bor

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse bora

Verb

bore (imperative bor, present tense borer, simple past and past participle bora or boret, present participle borende)

  1. to bore or drill (make a hole through something)

Derived terms

  • borerigg

References

  • “bore” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

bore

  1. past participle of bera

Welsh

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *bāregos (morning). Compare Breton beure, Old Irish bárach (whence i mbárach (tomorrow), modern Irish amáireach and amárach).

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales, standard, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈbɔrɛ/
    • (North Wales, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈbɔra/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /ˈboːrɛ/, /ˈbɔrɛ/

Noun

bore m (plural boreau)

  1. morning

Derived terms

  • bore da (good morning)
  • bore coffi (coffee morning)

Related terms

  • yfory

Mutation


English

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkæl.ə.bɚ/
  • Hyphenation: cal‧i‧ber

Noun

calibre (countable and uncountable, plural calibres)

  1. Alternative form of caliber

Usage notes

  • More common than caliber in UK, etc

Related terms

  • calibrate

Anagrams

  • caliber

French

Etymology

From Arabic قَالِب(qālib).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ka.libʁ/

Noun

calibre m (plural calibres)

  1. calibre

Descendants

Verb

calibre

  1. first-person singular present indicative of calibrer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of calibrer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of calibrer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of calibrer
  5. second-person singular imperative of calibrer

Further reading

  • “calibre” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • ciblera

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /kɐˈlibɾɨ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /kaˈʎibɾi/
  • Hyphenation: ca‧li‧bre

Noun

calibre m (plural calibres)

  1. caliber / calibre (dimension)
  2. gauge (mathematics, physics)

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kaˈlibɾe/, [kaˈli.β̞ɾe]

Etymology 1

From French calibre.

Noun

calibre m (plural calibres)

  1. calibre
  2. calipers
  3. jig, gauge (tool)
Derived terms
  • calibrar
Descendants
  • Tagalog: kalibre

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

calibre

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of calibrar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of calibrar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of calibrar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of calibrar.

Further reading

  • “calibre” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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