boss vs chief what difference

what is difference between boss and chief

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation): IPA(key): /bɒs/
  • (General American): IPA(key): /bɔs/
  • (cotcaught merger, Canada): IPA(key): /bɑs/
  • Rhymes: -ɒs, -ɔːs

Etymology 1

From Dutch baas, from Middle Dutch baes (master of a household, friend), from Old Dutch *baso (uncle, kinsman), from Proto-Germanic *baswô, masculine form of Proto-Germanic *baswǭ (father’s sister, aunt, cousin). Cognate with Middle Low German bās (supervisor, foreman), Old Frisian bas (master), hence Saterland Frisian Boas (boss), Old High German basa (father’s sister, cousin), hence German Base (aunt, cousin).

Originally a term of respect used to address an older relative. Later, in New Amsterdam, it began to mean a person in charge who is not a master. The representation of Dutch -aa- by English -o- is due to the older unrounded pronunciation of this letter, which is still used in North America and parts of Ireland, but was formerly found in some British accents as well.

The video game sense is borrowed from Japanese ボス (bosu).

Noun

boss (plural bosses)

  1. A person who oversees and directs the work of others; a supervisor.
    • February 18, 2018, Dawn Pine, Strategies for Dealing with a Bad Boss
      we have some vindictive people as bosses, and you don’t want to be the target of their wrath.
  2. A person in charge of a business or company.
    Synonym: employer
  3. A leader, the head of an organized group or team.
    Synonyms: head, leader
  4. The head of a political party in a given region or district.
    Synonym: leader
  5. (informal, especially India and MLE) A term of address to a man.
  6. (video games) An enemy, often at the end of a level, that is particularly challenging and must be beaten in order to progress.
    Synonym: guardian
  7. (humorous) Wife.
Synonyms
  • (person who oversees and directs the work of others): line manager, manager, supervisor
  • (informal: term of address to a man): gov/guv (UK), guvnor (UK), mate (UK)
  • See also Thesaurus:boss
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Japanese: ボス (bosu)
  • Indonesian: bos
Translations

Verb

boss (third-person singular simple present bosses, present participle bossing, simple past and past participle bossed)

  1. (transitive) To exercise authoritative control over; to tell (someone) what to do, often repeatedly.
    Synonyms: lord over, boss around
    • 1931, Robert L. May, Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer, Montgomery Ward (publisher):
      By YOU last night’s journey was actually bossed / Without you, I’m certain, we’d all have been lost.
    • 1932, Lorine Pruette, The Parent and the Happy Child, page 76
      His sisters bossed him and spoiled him. All their lives he was to go on being their little brother, who could do no wrong, because he was the baby; […]
    • 1967, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, The purloined paperweight, page 90
      She bossed him, and he’s never gotten over it. She still orders him around, and instead of telling her to go soak her head, he just says ‘Yes, ma’am’ as weak as a newborn jellyfish […]
    • 1980, Jean Toomer The wayward and the seeking: a collection of writings by Jean Toomer, page 40
      For if, on the one hand, I bossed him and showed him what to do and how to do it, […]
Derived terms
  • boss about, boss around, overboss
Translations

Adjective

boss (not comparable)

  1. (slang, US, Canada, Liverpudlian) Of excellent quality, first-rate.

Etymology 2

From Middle English bos, bose, boce, from Old French boce (lump, bulge, protuberance, knot), from Frankish *bottja, from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to hit, strike, beat). Doublet of beat; see there for more.

Noun

boss (plural bosses)

  1. A swelling, lump or protuberance in an animal, person or object.
  2. (geology) A lump-like mass of rock, especially one projecting through a stratum of different rock.
  3. A convex protuberance in hammered work, especially the rounded projection in the centre of a shield.
  4. (mechanics) A protrusion, frequently a cylinder of material that extends beyond a hole.
    • 1985, Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian, chapter IV
      The seargent … screwing a bipod into the threaded boss on the underside of the barrel would kill these animals …
  5. (architecture) A knob or projection, usually at the intersection of ribs in a vault.
  6. (archery) A target block, made of foam but historically made of hay bales, to which a target face is attached.
  7. A wooden vessel for the mortar used in tiling or masonry, hung by a hook from the laths, or from the rounds of a ladder.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gwilt to this entry?)
  8. A head or reservoir of water.
Derived terms
  • bosslike
  • emboss
Translations

Verb

boss (third-person singular simple present bosses, present participle bossing, simple past and past participle bossed)

  1. (transitive) To decorate with bosses; to emboss.

Etymology 3

Apparently a corruption of bass.

Noun

boss (plural bosses)

  1. (obsolete) A hassock or small seat, especially made from a bundle of straw.
    • 1916, James Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Macmillan Press Ltd, paperback, 36:
      All were waiting : uncle Charles, who sat far away in the shadow of the window, Dante and Mr Casey, who sat in the easy chairs at either side of the hearth, Stephen, seated on a chair between them, his feet resting on a toasting boss.
Synonyms
  • (hassock or footrest): footrest, hassock
Translations

Anagrams

  • BSOs, SOBs, sobs

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English boss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔs/

Noun

boss m or f (plural boss or bosses)

  1. boss (leader)

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English boss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔs/

Noun

boss m (invariable)

  1. boss (leader of a business, company or criminal organization)
    Synonym: capo

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

  • bøss

Noun

boss n (definite singular bosset, uncountable)

  1. garbage, rubbish, trash (leftover waste to be discarded)
Usage notes

Used mainly in the Bergen region.

Etymology 2

Noun

boss m (definite singular bossen, indefinite plural bosser, definite plural bossene)

  1. (colloquial) boss, supervisor (someone who oversees work)
  2. boss (final enemy in a video game)

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔsː/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

boss n (definite singular bosset, uncountable)

  1. alternative form of bos

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English boss.

Noun

boss c

  1. (video games) boss; final enemy
  2. (colloquial) boss, supervisor; someone who oversees work
    Synonym: chef

Declension

Hyponyms

  • (video games): mellanboss (miniboss), miniboss (miniboss), nivåboss (level boss), slutboss (final boss)

Tagalog

Etymology

From English boss.

Noun

boss

  1. (colloquial, slang, informal) A male term of address.
  2. (colloquial, slang, informal) boss

Derived terms

  • bosing


English

Etymology

From Middle English chef, borrowed from Old French chief (leader), from Vulgar Latin capus (from which also captain, chieftain), from Latin caput (head) (English cap (head covering)), from Proto-Indo-European *kauput- (English head).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʃiːf/
  • Rhymes: -iːf

Noun

chief (plural chiefs)

  1. A leader or head of a group of people, organisation, etc. [from 13th c.]
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 4:
      My father, Gadla Henry Mphakanyiswa, was a chief by both blood and custom.
    All firefighters report to the fire chief.
  2. (heraldry) The top part of a shield or escutcheon; more specifically, an ordinary consisting of the upper part of the field cut off by a horizontal line, generally occupying the top third. [from 15th c.]
    • 1889, Charles Norton Elvin, A Dictionary of Heraldry:
      When the Chief is Charged with any figure, in blazon it is said to be “On a Chief“.
  3. The principal part or top of anything.
  4. An informal term of address, sometimes ironic.
    Hey, chief.
    1. (US, Canada, offensive) An informal term of address for a Native American or First Nations man.

Synonyms

  • chieftain
  • See also Thesaurus:boss

Hyponyms

  • chiefess (female chief)

Derived terms

Pages starting with “chief”.

Related terms

  • captain
  • chef
  • chieftain

Descendants

  • Japanese: チーフ (chīfu)
  • Swahili: chifu

Translations

Adjective

chief (comparative chiefer or more chief, superlative chiefest or most chief)

  1. Primary; principal.
  2. (Scotland) Intimate, friendly.
    • 2006, James Robertson: The Testament of Gideon Mack, p 324:
      ‘You’re doing it because she was your friend, not because she was a parishioner, and certainly not because of the Declaratory Articles,’ Macmurray said, pushing himself forward on his seat. ‘Everybody knows how chief you and she were. It was an unfitting relationship for a minister while she was alive, and it is equally unfitting for you to do her a favour like this now she’s dead.’

Translations

Verb

chief (third-person singular simple present chiefs, present participle chiefing, simple past and past participle chiefed)

  1. (US, slang) To smoke cannabis.
    • 2012, Marquis “Cream” Cureton, When the Smoke Clears (page 268)
      He chiefed on the bud like a pro, taking long deep hits and holding it within until he had inhaled as much of the weed smoke as he could.

See also

  • chef

Anagrams

  • cheif, fiche, fiché

Middle English

Noun

chief

  1. Alternative form of chef

Adjective

chief

  1. Alternative form of chef

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French chief.

Noun

chief m (plural chiefs)

  1. head

Descendants

  • French: chef (see there for further descendants)

Old French

Alternative forms

  • cap (La Vie de Saint Léger, circa 980)
  • chef, cief

Etymology

First known attestation 881 in The Sequence of Saint Eulalia. From Vulgar Latin capus, from Latin caput.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʃjeːf/

Noun

chief m (oblique plural chiés, nominative singular chiés, nominative plural chief)

  1. (anatomy) head
    • circa 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
      Le chief li desarme et la face.

      He exposed his head and his face.
  2. leader, chief
  3. front (foremost side of something)

Descendants

  • Middle French: chief
    • French: chef (see there for further descendants)
  • Norman: chef
  • Middle English: chef
    • English: chief
    • Scots: chief
  • Old Spanish: xefe
    • Spanish: jefe, gefe
      • English: jefe
      • Cebuano: hepe
    • Asturian: xefe
    • Galician: xefe
    • Portuguese: chefe

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial