bother vs inconvenience what difference

what is difference between bother and inconvenience

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Scots bauther, bather (to bother). Origin unknown. Perhaps related to Scots pother (to make a stir or commotion, bustle), also of unknown origin. Compare English pother (to poke, prod), variant of potter (to poke). More at potter. Perhaps related to Irish bodhaire (noise), Irish bodhraim (to deafen, annoy).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bŏʹ-thər, IPA(key): /ˈbɒðəɹ/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): [ˈbɔðə(ɹ)]
  • (UK) IPA(key): [ˈbɒðə(ɹ)]
    • Rhymes: -ɒðə(r)
  • (US) IPA(key): [ˈbɑðɚ]

Verb

bother (third-person singular simple present bothers, present participle bothering, simple past and past participle bothered)

  1. (transitive) To annoy, to disturb, to irritate.
  2. (intransitive) To feel care or anxiety; to make or take trouble; to be troublesome.
  3. (intransitive) To do something which is of negligible inconvenience.

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive or the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Synonyms

  • (annoy): annoy, disturb, irritate, put out, vex; see also Thesaurus:annoy
  • (make or take trouble): care, mind; see also Thesaurus:care

Derived terms

  • bebother

Descendants

  • Jersey Dutch: boddere

Translations

References

Noun

bother (countable and uncountable, plural bothers)

  1. Fuss, ado.
    There was a bit of bother at the hairdresser’s when they couldn’t find my appointment in the book.
  2. Trouble, inconvenience.
    Yes, I can do that for you – it’s no bother.

Synonyms

  • (fuss, ado): See also Thesaurus:commotion
  • (trouble, inconvenience): See also Thesaurus:nuisance

Derived terms

  • bothersome
  • spot of bother

Translations

Interjection

bother!

  1. A mild expression of annoyance.
    • 1926, A A Milne, Winnie the Pooh, Methuen & Co., Ltd., Chapter 2 …in which Pooh goes visiting and gets into a tight place:
      “Oh, help!” said Pooh. “I’d better go back.”
      “Oh, bother!” said Pooh. “I shall have to go on.”
      “I can’t do either!” said Pooh. “Oh, help and bother!”

Synonyms

  • botheration, blast, dang (US), darn, drat, phooey, fiddlesticks

Translations

Related terms

  • be bothered
  • bothered
  • bothersome

Anagrams

  • Hobert, boreth


English

Etymology

From Middle English inconvenience, from Old French inconvenience (misfortune, calamity, impropriety) (compare French inconvenance (impropriety) and inconvénient (inconvenience)), from Late Latin inconvenientia (inconsistency, incongruity).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪnkənˈviːnɪəns/, /ɪŋk-/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪnkənˈvinjəns/, /ɪŋk-/
  • Hyphenation: in‧con‧ve‧nience

Noun

inconvenience (countable and uncountable, plural inconveniences)

  1. The quality of being inconvenient.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      They plead against the inconvenience, not the unlawfulness, [] of ceremonies in burial.
  2. Something that is not convenient, something that bothers.
    • 1663, John Tillotson, The Wisdom of being Religious
      [Man] is liable to a great many inconveniences.

Synonyms

  • (something inconvenient): annoyance, nuisance, trouble

Translations

Verb

inconvenience (third-person singular simple present inconveniences, present participle inconveniencing, simple past and past participle inconvenienced)

  1. to bother; to discomfort

Synonyms

  • (obsolete) discommodate

Translations

Further reading

  • inconvenience in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • inconvenience in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial