bounce vs jounce what difference

what is difference between bounce and jounce

English

Etymology

From Middle English bunsen (to beat, thump), perhaps imitative. Compare Low German bunsen (to beat), Dutch bonzen (to thump, knock, throb), and akin to bonken (to bang, smash), and possibly English bang.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bouns, IPA(key): /baʊns/
  • Rhymes: -aʊns

Verb

bounce (third-person singular simple present bounces, present participle bouncing, simple past and past participle bounced)

  1. (intransitive) To change the direction of motion after hitting an obstacle.
  2. (intransitive) To move quickly up and then down, or vice versa, once or repeatedly.
  3. (transitive) To cause to move quickly up and down, or back and forth, once or repeatedly.
  4. (transitive, colloquial) To suggest or introduce (an idea, etc.) to (off or by) somebody, in order to gain feedback.
  5. (intransitive) To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, On Mr. Pulteney’s Being Put Out of the Council
      Out bounced the mastiff.
  6. To move rapidly (between).
  7. (intransitive, informal, of a cheque/check) To be refused by a bank because it is drawn on insufficient funds.
  8. (transitive, informal) To fail to cover (have sufficient funds for) (a draft presented against one’s account).
  9. (intransitive, slang) To leave.
  10. (US, slang, dated) To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment.
    • 1946, Yachting (volume 80, page 46)
      Nobody took umbrage and bounced me out of the Union for being a pro.
  11. (intransitive, slang, African-American Vernacular) (sometimes employing the preposition with) To have sexual intercourse.
  12. (transitive, air combat) To attack unexpectedly.
  13. (intransitive, electronics) To turn power off and back on; to reset.
  14. (transitive, intransitive, Internet, of an e-mail message) To return undelivered.
  15. (intransitive, aviation) To land hard and lift off again due to excess momentum.
  16. (intransitive, skydiving) To land hard at unsurvivable velocity with fatal results.
  17. (transitive, sound recording) To mix (two or more tracks of a multi-track audio tape recording) and record the result onto a single track, in order to free up tracks for further material to be added.
  18. (slang, archaic) To bully; to scold.
  19. (slang, archaic) To boast; to bluster.
  20. (archaic) To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; to knock loudly.
    • 1708, John Partridge, Squire Bickerstaff Detected
      Another bounces as hard as he can knock.

Synonyms

  • (change direction of motion after hitting an obstacle): bounce back, rebound
  • (move quickly up and down): bob
  • (have sexual intercourse): bang, do it, have sex; see also Thesaurus:copulate

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

bounce (countable and uncountable, plural bounces)

  1. A change of direction of motion after hitting the ground or an obstacle.
  2. A movement up and then down (or vice versa), once or repeatedly.
  3. (Internet) An email that returns to the sender because of a delivery failure.
  4. The sack, licensing.
  5. A bang, boom.
    • 1773, Oliver Goldsmith, She Stoops to Conquer
      I don’t value her resentment the bounce of a cracker.
  6. (archaic) A drink based on brandyW.
  7. (archaic) A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump.
    • 1685, John Dryden, The Despairing Lover
      The bounce burst ope[sic] the door.
  8. (archaic) Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
    • 1827, Thomas De Quincey, On Murder Considered as one of the Fine Arts
      And, in fact, the whole story is a bounce of his own. For, in a most abusive letter which he wrote “to a learned person,” (meaning Wallis the mathematician,) he gives quite another account of the matter
  9. Scyliorhinus canicula, a European dogfish.
  10. A genre of New Orleans music.
  11. (slang, African-American Vernacular) Drugs.
  12. (slang, African-American Vernacular) Swagger.
  13. (slang, African-American Vernacular) A ‘good’ beat.
  14. (slang, African-American Vernacular) A talent for leaping.

Synonyms

  • (change of direction of motion after hitting an obstacle): rebound
  • (movement up and down): bob, bobbing (repeated), bouncing (repeated)
  • (talent for leaping): ups, mad ups

Derived terms

  • bouncy
  • on the bounce

Translations

References



English

Etymology

Of unknown origin, possibly a Portmanteau / Blend of jolt +‎ bounce.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -aʊns

Verb

jounce (third-person singular simple present jounces, present participle jouncing, simple past and past participle jounced)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To jolt; to shake, especially by rough riding or by driving over obstructions.
    • 1931, William Faulkner, Sanctuary, Library of America, 1985, p.51:
      She felt herself swooping, then she was lying on the bed beside Gowan, on her back, jouncing to the dying chatter of the shucks.

Derived terms

  • jouncy

Translations

Noun

jounce (countable and uncountable, plural jounces)

  1. (physics) The fourth derivative of the position vector with respect to time; the time derivative of jerk.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial