bounderish vs rude what difference

what is difference between bounderish and rude

English

Etymology

bounder +‎ -ish

Adjective

bounderish (comparative more bounderish, superlative most bounderish)

  1. Pertaining to or having the characteristics of a bounder; loutish; boorish.
    • 1967 March 3, “The War of Total Paper” (book review of The Soldier’s Art by Anthony Powell), Time:
      In Powell’s war, only the rotters flourish—notably Kenneth Widmerpool, whose humorless egomania and bounderish one-upmanship have won him critical status as one of the great comic creations of modern English fiction.

Related terms

  • bounderishly
  • bounderishness

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., 1989.


English

Etymology

From Middle English rude, from Old French rude, ruide, from Latin rudis (rough, raw, rude, wild, untilled).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹuːd/, /ɹɪʊ̯d/ enPR: ro͞od
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɹud/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ɹʉːd/
  • Rhymes: -uːd
  • Homophones: rood, rued

Adjective

rude (comparative ruder, superlative rudest)

  1. Bad-mannered.
  2. Somewhat obscene, pornographic, offensive.
  3. Tough, robust.
  4. Undeveloped, unskilled, basic.
    • But though I be rude in speech, yet not in knowledge
    • 1919, Rudyard Kipling, The Conundrum of the Workshops
      When the flush of a new-born sun fell first on Eden’s green and gold,
      Our father Adam sat under the Tree and scratched with a stick in the mould;
      And the first rude sketch that the world had seen was joy to his mighty heart,
      Till the Devil whispered behind the leaves, “It’s pretty, but is it Art?”
  5. Hearty, vigorous; found particularly in the phrase rude health.

Synonyms

  • (bad-mannered): ill-mannered, uncouth; see Thesaurus:impolite
  • (obscene, pornographic, offensive): adult, blue; see also Thesaurus:obscene or Thesaurus:pornographic
  • (undeveloped): primitive; see Thesaurus:crude

Derived terms

  • rude word
  • rudely
  • rudeness
  • rudesby
  • rudish

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • rude in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • rude in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • rude at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Duer, dure, rued, urdé, ured

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin rudis.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈru.də/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈru.de/

Adjective

rude (masculine and feminine plural rudes)

  1. uncultured, rough

Derived terms

  • rudement
  • rudesa

Further reading

  • “rude” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ruːdə/, [ˈʁuːðə]
  • Rhymes: -uːðə

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German rūte, from Old High German rūta (German Raute (rhomb)), probably from Latin rūta (rue).

Noun

rude c (singular definite ruden, plural indefinite ruder)

  1. pane
  2. window
  3. square
  4. lozenge, diamond
Inflection

Etymology 2

From late Old Norse rúta, from Middle Low German rūde, from Latin rūta (rue).

Noun

rude c (singular definite ruden, plural indefinite ruder)

  1. (botany) rue (various perennial shrubs of the genus Ruta)
Inflection

See also

  • ruder
  • rude on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da
  • Rude-familien on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

French

Etymology

Old French rude, from Latin rudis (unwrought).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁyd/

Adjective

rude (plural rudes)

  1. rough, harsh
    • March 28 1757, Robert-François Damiens, facing a horrific execution
      “La journée sera rude.” (“The day will be rough.”)
  2. tough, hard; severe
  3. bitter, harsh, sharp (of weather)
  4. crude, unpolished
  5. hardy, tough, rugged
  6. (informal) formidable, fearsome

Derived terms

  • esprit rude
  • mettre à rude épreuve
  • rudement

Further reading

  • “rude” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • dure, duré, redû

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin rūta, from Ancient Greek ῥυτή (rhutḗ).

Noun

rude f (plural rudis)

  1. rue, common rue (Ruta graveolens)

Galician

Etymology

From Latin rudis, rudem.

Adjective

rude

  1. tough
  2. rough, coarse

References

  • “rude” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.

Italian

Etymology

From Latin rudis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈru.de/
  • Rhymes: -ude

Adjective

rude (invariable)

  1. tough
  2. rough, coarse

Anagrams

  • dure

Latin

Adjective

rude

  1. nominative neuter singular of rudis
  2. accusative neuter singular of rudis
  3. vocative neuter singular of rudis

References

  • rude in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Norman

Etymology

From Latin rudis.

Adjective

rude m or f

  1. (Jersey) rough

Derived terms

  • rudement

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈru.dɛ/
  • Homophone: rudę

Adjective

rude

  1. inflection of rudy:
    1. neuter nominative/accusative/vocative singular
    2. nonvirile nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin rudis

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈʁu.dʒi/
  • Rhymes: -udʒi

Adjective

rude m or f (plural rudes, comparable)

  1. rude; bad-mannered
    Synonyms: brusco, grosseiro, mal-educado

Serbo-Croatian

Adjective

rude

  1. inflection of rud:
    1. masculine accusative plural
    2. feminine genitive singular
    3. feminine nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Noun

rude (Cyrillic spelling руде)

  1. inflection of ruda:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Slovak

Noun

rude

  1. dative/locative singular of ruda

Venetian

Noun

rude

  1. plural of ruda

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