bow vs stem what difference

what is difference between bow and stem

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English bowe, boȝe, from Old English boga, from Proto-West Germanic *bogō, from Proto-Germanic *bugô. Cognate with West Frisian boge, Dutch boog, German Bogen, Danish bue, Norwegian boge, bue, Swedish båge.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: , IPA(key): /bəʊ/
  • (US) enPR: , IPA(key): /boʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • Homophone: beau

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. A weapon made of a curved piece of wood or other flexible material whose ends are connected by a string, used for shooting arrows.
  2. A curved bend in a rod or planar surface, or in a linear formation such as a river (see oxbow).
  3. A rod with horsehair (or an artificial substitute) stretched between the ends, used for playing various stringed musical instruments.
  4. A stringed instrument (chordophone), consisting of a stick with a single taut cord stretched between the ends, most often played by plucking.
  5. A type of knot with two loops, used to tie together two cords such as shoelaces or apron strings, and frequently used as decoration, such as in gift-wrapping.
  6. Anything bent or curved, such as a rainbow.
    • I do set my bow in the cloud.
  7. The U-shaped piece which goes around the neck of an ox and fastens it to the yoke.
  8. Either of the arms of a pair of spectacles, running from the side of the lens to behind the wearer’s ear.
  9. Any instrument consisting of an elastic rod, with ends connected by a string, employed for giving reciprocating motion to a drill, or for preparing and arranging hair, fur, etc., used by hatters.
  10. (nautical) A crude sort of quadrant formerly used for taking the sun’s altitude at sea.
  11. (saddlery) Two pieces of wood which form the arched forward part of a saddletree.
  12. The part of a key that is not inserted into the lock and that is used to turn the key.
    Coordinate term: blade
Synonyms
  • (bow-shaped bend): arc, bend, curve
  • (tool for playing stringed instruments): fiddlestick
  • (a type of stringed instrument): musical bow
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bow (third-person singular simple present bows, present participle bowing, simple past and past participle bowed)

  1. To play music on (a stringed) instrument using a bow.
    The musician bowed his violin expertly.
  2. (intransitive) To become bent or curved.
    The shelf bowed under the weight of the books.
  3. (transitive) To make something bend or curve.
    • 1843, William H. Prescott, The History of the Conquest of Mexico
      The whole nation [] bowed their necks to the worst kind of tyranny.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To exercise powerful or controlling influence over; to bend, figuratively; to turn; to incline.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Atheism
      Adversities do more bow men’s minds to religion.
    • not to bow and bias their opinions
Derived terms
  • bower
  • diddley bower
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bowen, buwen, buȝen, from Old English būgan, from Proto-West Germanic *beugan, from Proto-Germanic *beuganą, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūgʰ- (to bend). Cognate with Dutch buigen, German biegen, Danish bue.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bou, IPA(key): /baʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ
  • Homophone: bough

Verb

bow (third-person singular simple present bows, present participle bowing, simple past and past participle bowed)

  1. (intransitive) To bend oneself as a gesture of respect or deference.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
      The soldier now blew upon a green whistle, and at once a young girl, dressed in a pretty green silk gown, entered the room. She had lovely green hair and green eyes, and she bowed low before Dorothy as she said, “Follow me and I will show you your room.”
  2. (transitive and intransitive) To debut.
    • 2010 (publication date), Kara Krekeler, “Rebuilding the opera house”, West End Word, volume 39, number 26, December 22, 2010 – January 11, 2011, page 1:
      SCP recently announced that How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical will bow on the newly renovated stage next December.
  3. (intransitive) To defer (to something).
  4. (transitive) To give a direction, indication, or command to by bowing.
Hypernyms
  • (gesture): gesture; congee, congé, conge
Derived terms
Related terms
  • buxom
Translations

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. A gesture, usually showing respect, made by inclining the head or bending forward at the waist; a reverence
    He made a polite bow as he entered the room.
Hypernyms
  • (gesture): gesture; congee, congé, conge
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English bowe, bowgh, a borrowing from Middle Low German bôch and/or Middle Dutch boech, from Proto-Germanic *bōguz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵʰus (arm). Cognate with Dutch boeg (bow), Danish bov (bow), Swedish bog (bow). Doublet of bough.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bou, IPA(key): /baʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ
  • Homophone: bough

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. (nautical) The front of a boat or ship.
  2. (rowing) The rower that sits in the seat closest to the bow of the boat.
Synonyms
  • (of a ship): prow
Antonyms
  • (of a ship): poop, stern
Derived terms
  • bow rudder
  • bow shock
  • shot across the bow, shot across the bows
Usage notes
  • Often used in the plural, the ship being considered to have starboard and port bows, meeting at the stern.
Translations

Etymology 4

See bough.

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. (obsolete spelling of, en, bough)

See also

  • coll’arco
  • curtsy
  • kowtow
  • Wikipedia article on bows (weapons)
  • Wikipedia article on bows used to play string instruments
  • Wikipedia article on bows (the knots)
  • Wikipedia article on musical bows
  • Wikipedia article on bows, the gestures of respect
  • Wikipedia article on the bows of ships
  • Bow in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • WBO, Wob

Sranan Tongo

Etymology

From Dutch bouwen (to build).

Verb

bow

  1. to build
  2. (figuratively, with tapu) to trust, to depend on

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /boːf/

Noun

bōw f (plural bowa)

  1. woman
  2. wife


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: stĕm, IPA(key): /stɛm/
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Etymology 1

From Middle English stem, stemme, stempne, stevin, from Old English stemn, from Proto-Germanic *stamniz.

Noun

stem (plural stems)

  1. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.
    • 1633, George Herbert, Church Monuments
      While I do pray, learn here thy stem / And true descent.
  2. A branch of a family.
  3. An advanced or leading position; the lookout.
    • Wolsey sat at the stem more than twenty years.
  4. (botany) The above-ground stalk (technically axis) of a vascular plant, and certain anatomically similar, below-ground organs such as rhizomes, bulbs, tubers, and corms.
    • 1736, Sir Walter Raleigh, The History of the World in Five Books
      After they are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough nor twig in the trunk or the stem.
  5. A slender supporting member of an individual part of a plant such as a flower or a leaf; also, by analogy, the shaft of a feather.
  6. A narrow part on certain man-made objects, such as a wine glass, a tobacco pipe, a spoon.
  7. (linguistics) The main part of an uninflected word to which affixes may be added to form inflections of the word. A stem often has a more fundamental root. Systematic conjugations and declensions derive from their stems.
  8. (slang) A person’s leg.
    • 2008, Lori Wilde, Rhonda Nelson, Cara Summers, August Harlequin Blaze
      She was perfectly, fuckably proportioned everywhere else, both above and below her waist. A pocket-size Venus, with the longest stems he’d ever seen on someone so dang diminutive.
  9. (slang) The penis.
  10. (typography) A vertical stroke of a letter.
  11. (music) A vertical stroke marking the length of a note in written music.
    Synonyms: tail, (obsolete) virgula
  12. (music) A premixed portion of a track for use in audio mastering and remixing.
  13. (nautical) The vertical or nearly vertical forward extension of the keel, to which the forward ends of the planks or strakes are attached.
  14. (cycling) A component on a bicycle that connects the handlebars to the bicycle fork.
  15. (anatomy) A part of an anatomic structure considered without its possible branches or ramifications.
  16. (slang) A crack pipe; or the long, hollow portion of a similar pipe (i.e. meth pipe) resembling a crack pipe.
  17. (chiefly Britain) A winder on a clock, watch, or similar mechanism.
Derived terms
Translations
References

“stem” in the Collins English Dictionary

Verb

stem (third-person singular simple present stems, present participle stemming, simple past and past participle stemmed)

  1. To remove the stem from.
  2. To be caused or derived; to originate.
  3. To descend in a family line.
  4. To direct the stem (of a ship) against; to make headway against.
  5. (obsolete) To hit with the stem of a ship; to ram.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.ii:
      As when two warlike Brigandines at sea, / With murdrous weapons arm’d to cruell fight, / Doe meete together on the watry lea, / They stemme ech other with so fell despight, / That with the shocke of their owne heedlesse might, / Their wooden ribs are shaken nigh a sonder []
  6. To ram (clay, etc.) into a blasting hole.
Synonyms
  • (to originate, stem from): to be due to, to arise from
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English stemmen, a borrowing from Old Norse stemma (to stop, stem, dam) (whence Danish stemme/stæmme (to stem, dam up)), from Proto-Germanic *stammijaną. Cognate with German stemmen, Middle Dutch stemmen, stempen. Compare stammer.

Verb

stem (third-person singular simple present stems, present participle stemming, simple past and past participle stemmed)

  1. (transitive) To stop, hinder (for instance, a river or blood).
    to stem a tide
    • [They] stem the flood with their erected breasts.
  2. (skiing) To move the feet apart and point the tips of the skis inward in order to slow down the speed or to facilitate a turn.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:hinder
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

stem (plural stems)

  1. Alternative form of steem

Etymology 4

Acronym of science, technology, engineering, (and) mathematics.

Noun

stem (plural stems)

  1. Alternative form of STEM
    • 2015 May 29th, BBC News, How do US black students perform at school?
      Stem (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields are a particular cause for concern because within them there are more pronounced stereotypes, extreme competitiveness and gender inequities regarding the abilities and competencies of black male and female students.

Further reading

  • stem in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • stem in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “stem”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • EMTs, Mets, Smet, TEMs, mets

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɛm/

Etymology 1

From Dutch stem, from Middle Dutch stemme, from Old Dutch *stemma, from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stamnijō.

Noun

stem (plural stemme)

  1. vote
  2. voice

Etymology 2

From Dutch stemmen.

Verb

stem (present stem, present participle stemmende, past participle gestem)

  1. to vote

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch stemme, from Old Dutch *stemma, from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stamnijō. Under influence of Latin vox (voice, word), it acquired the now obsolete sense of “word”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɛm/
  • Hyphenation: stem
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Noun

stem f (plural stemmen, diminutive stemmetje n)

  1. voice, sound made by the mouth using airflow
  2. the ability to speak
  3. vote
  4. (obsolete) word
  5. (phonetics) voice, property formed by vibration of the vocal cords

Derived terms

  • foertstem
  • proteststem

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: stem
  • Negerhollands: stem
  • Indonesian: setem
  • Papiamentu: stèm
  • Sranan Tongo: sten

Verb

stem

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stemmen
  2. imperative of stemmen

Anagrams

  • mest, mets

Latin

Verb

stem

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of stō

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

stem

  1. imperative of stemme

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

stem

  1. imperative of stemme

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English stamp.

Noun

stem

  1. stamp

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