bow vs stoop what difference

what is difference between bow and stoop

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English bowe, boȝe, from Old English boga, from Proto-West Germanic *bogō, from Proto-Germanic *bugô. Cognate with West Frisian boge, Dutch boog, German Bogen, Danish bue, Norwegian boge, bue, Swedish båge.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: , IPA(key): /bəʊ/
  • (US) enPR: , IPA(key): /boʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • Homophone: beau

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. A weapon made of a curved piece of wood or other flexible material whose ends are connected by a string, used for shooting arrows.
  2. A curved bend in a rod or planar surface, or in a linear formation such as a river (see oxbow).
  3. A rod with horsehair (or an artificial substitute) stretched between the ends, used for playing various stringed musical instruments.
  4. A stringed instrument (chordophone), consisting of a stick with a single taut cord stretched between the ends, most often played by plucking.
  5. A type of knot with two loops, used to tie together two cords such as shoelaces or apron strings, and frequently used as decoration, such as in gift-wrapping.
  6. Anything bent or curved, such as a rainbow.
    • I do set my bow in the cloud.
  7. The U-shaped piece which goes around the neck of an ox and fastens it to the yoke.
  8. Either of the arms of a pair of spectacles, running from the side of the lens to behind the wearer’s ear.
  9. Any instrument consisting of an elastic rod, with ends connected by a string, employed for giving reciprocating motion to a drill, or for preparing and arranging hair, fur, etc., used by hatters.
  10. (nautical) A crude sort of quadrant formerly used for taking the sun’s altitude at sea.
  11. (saddlery) Two pieces of wood which form the arched forward part of a saddletree.
  12. The part of a key that is not inserted into the lock and that is used to turn the key.
    Coordinate term: blade
Synonyms
  • (bow-shaped bend): arc, bend, curve
  • (tool for playing stringed instruments): fiddlestick
  • (a type of stringed instrument): musical bow
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bow (third-person singular simple present bows, present participle bowing, simple past and past participle bowed)

  1. To play music on (a stringed) instrument using a bow.
    The musician bowed his violin expertly.
  2. (intransitive) To become bent or curved.
    The shelf bowed under the weight of the books.
  3. (transitive) To make something bend or curve.
    • 1843, William H. Prescott, The History of the Conquest of Mexico
      The whole nation [] bowed their necks to the worst kind of tyranny.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To exercise powerful or controlling influence over; to bend, figuratively; to turn; to incline.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Atheism
      Adversities do more bow men’s minds to religion.
    • not to bow and bias their opinions
Derived terms
  • bower
  • diddley bower
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bowen, buwen, buȝen, from Old English būgan, from Proto-West Germanic *beugan, from Proto-Germanic *beuganą, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūgʰ- (to bend). Cognate with Dutch buigen, German biegen, Danish bue.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bou, IPA(key): /baʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ
  • Homophone: bough

Verb

bow (third-person singular simple present bows, present participle bowing, simple past and past participle bowed)

  1. (intransitive) To bend oneself as a gesture of respect or deference.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
      The soldier now blew upon a green whistle, and at once a young girl, dressed in a pretty green silk gown, entered the room. She had lovely green hair and green eyes, and she bowed low before Dorothy as she said, “Follow me and I will show you your room.”
  2. (transitive and intransitive) To debut.
    • 2010 (publication date), Kara Krekeler, “Rebuilding the opera house”, West End Word, volume 39, number 26, December 22, 2010 – January 11, 2011, page 1:
      SCP recently announced that How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical will bow on the newly renovated stage next December.
  3. (intransitive) To defer (to something).
  4. (transitive) To give a direction, indication, or command to by bowing.
Hypernyms
  • (gesture): gesture; congee, congé, conge
Derived terms
Related terms
  • buxom
Translations

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. A gesture, usually showing respect, made by inclining the head or bending forward at the waist; a reverence
    He made a polite bow as he entered the room.
Hypernyms
  • (gesture): gesture; congee, congé, conge
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English bowe, bowgh, a borrowing from Middle Low German bôch and/or Middle Dutch boech, from Proto-Germanic *bōguz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵʰus (arm). Cognate with Dutch boeg (bow), Danish bov (bow), Swedish bog (bow). Doublet of bough.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bou, IPA(key): /baʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ
  • Homophone: bough

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. (nautical) The front of a boat or ship.
  2. (rowing) The rower that sits in the seat closest to the bow of the boat.
Synonyms
  • (of a ship): prow
Antonyms
  • (of a ship): poop, stern
Derived terms
  • bow rudder
  • bow shock
  • shot across the bow, shot across the bows
Usage notes
  • Often used in the plural, the ship being considered to have starboard and port bows, meeting at the stern.
Translations

Etymology 4

See bough.

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. (obsolete spelling of, en, bough)

See also

  • coll’arco
  • curtsy
  • kowtow
  • Wikipedia article on bows (weapons)
  • Wikipedia article on bows used to play string instruments
  • Wikipedia article on bows (the knots)
  • Wikipedia article on musical bows
  • Wikipedia article on bows, the gestures of respect
  • Wikipedia article on the bows of ships
  • Bow in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • WBO, Wob

Sranan Tongo

Etymology

From Dutch bouwen (to build).

Verb

bow

  1. to build
  2. (figuratively, with tapu) to trust, to depend on

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /boːf/

Noun

bōw f (plural bowa)

  1. woman
  2. wife


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /stuːp/
  • Rhymes: -uːp

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Dutch stoep (platform”, “pavement). Doublet of stoep. Cognate with step.

Noun

stoop (plural stoops)

  1. (chiefly Northeastern US, chiefly New York, also Canada) The staircase and landing or porch leading to the entrance of a residence.
    Synonyms: porch, verandah
    • 1856 James Fenimore Cooper, Satanstoe or The Littlepage Manuscripts: A Tale of the Colony (London, 1856) page 110
      Nearly all the houses were built with their gables to the streets and each had heavy wooden Dutch stoops, with seats, at its door.
    • 1905 Carpentry and Building, vol. 27 (January 1905), NY: David Williams Company, page 2
      …the entrance being at the side of the house and reached by a low front stoop with four or five risers…
  2. (US) The threshold of a doorway, a doorstep.
    Synonyms: step, doorstep
Related terms
  • stoep
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English stoupen, from Old English stūpian (to bow, bend), from Proto-Germanic *stūpōną, *stūpijaną (to stand out), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tewb- (to push, butt, knock). Compare steep. Cognate with Dutch stuipen (to bend the upper part of the body forward and downward), Old Norse stúpa (to stoop). Related also to Old Frisian stēpa (to help), Old Norse steypa (to cause to stoop, cast down, overthrow).

Verb

stoop (third-person singular simple present stoops, present participle stooping, simple past and past participle stooped)

  1. To bend the upper part of the body forward and downward to a half-squatting position; crouch.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      Their walk had continued not more than ten minutes when they crossed a creek by a wooden bridge and came to a row of mean houses standing flush with the street. At the door of one, an old black woman had stooped to lift a large basket, piled high with laundered clothes.
  2. To lower oneself; to demean or do something below one’s status, standards, or morals.
  3. (intransitive) Of a bird of prey: to swoop down on its prey.
    • 1882 [1875], Thomas Bewick, James Reiveley, William Harvey, The Parlour Menagerie, 4th ed., p. 63:
      Presently the bird stooped and seized a salmon, and a violent struggle ensued.
  4. (transitive) To cause to incline downward; to slant.
  5. (transitive) To cause to submit; to prostrate.
  6. To yield; to submit; to bend, as by compulsion; to assume a position of humility or subjection.
    • Mighty in her ships stood Carthage long, [] / Yet stooped to Rome, less wealthy, but more strong.
    • These are arts, my prince, / In which your Zama does not stoop to Rome.
  7. To descend from rank or dignity; to condescend.
    • 1773, Oliver Goldsmith, She Stoops to Conquer
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Riches
      Where men of great wealth do stoop to husbandry, it multiplieth riches exceedingly.
  8. To degrade.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
Synonyms

(bend oneself forwards and downwards):

  • bend down
  • crouch
  • squat
Derived terms
  • stoop and roop
Translations

Noun

stoop (plural stoops)

  1. A stooping, bent position of the body.
    The old man walked with a stoop.
    • 2011, Phil McNulty, Euro 2012: Montenegro 2-2 England [3]
      Theo Walcott’s final pass has often drawn criticism but there could be no complaint in the 11th minute when his perfect delivery to the far post only required a stoop and a nod of the head from Young to put England ahead.
  2. An accelerated descent in flight, as that for an attack.
    • 1819, Washington Irving, Bracebridge Hall: Hawking:
      At length the hawk got the upper hand, and made a rushing stoop at her quarry
Derived terms
  • stoopy
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English [Term?], from Old Norse stolpe.

Alternative forms

  • stoup

Noun

stoop (plural stoops)

  1. (dialect) A post or pillar, especially a gatepost or a support in a mine.
Derived terms
  • stoup and room

Etymology 4

From Old English stope.

Noun

stoop (plural stoops)

  1. A vessel for holding liquids; like a flagon but without the spout.
Alternative forms
  • stoup, stowp

Anagrams

  • Spoto, poots, topos

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