bow vs submit what difference

what is difference between bow and submit

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English bowe, boȝe, from Old English boga, from Proto-West Germanic *bogō, from Proto-Germanic *bugô. Cognate with West Frisian boge, Dutch boog, German Bogen, Danish bue, Norwegian boge, bue, Swedish båge.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: , IPA(key): /bəʊ/
  • (US) enPR: , IPA(key): /boʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • Homophone: beau

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. A weapon made of a curved piece of wood or other flexible material whose ends are connected by a string, used for shooting arrows.
  2. A curved bend in a rod or planar surface, or in a linear formation such as a river (see oxbow).
  3. A rod with horsehair (or an artificial substitute) stretched between the ends, used for playing various stringed musical instruments.
  4. A stringed instrument (chordophone), consisting of a stick with a single taut cord stretched between the ends, most often played by plucking.
  5. A type of knot with two loops, used to tie together two cords such as shoelaces or apron strings, and frequently used as decoration, such as in gift-wrapping.
  6. Anything bent or curved, such as a rainbow.
    • I do set my bow in the cloud.
  7. The U-shaped piece which goes around the neck of an ox and fastens it to the yoke.
  8. Either of the arms of a pair of spectacles, running from the side of the lens to behind the wearer’s ear.
  9. Any instrument consisting of an elastic rod, with ends connected by a string, employed for giving reciprocating motion to a drill, or for preparing and arranging hair, fur, etc., used by hatters.
  10. (nautical) A crude sort of quadrant formerly used for taking the sun’s altitude at sea.
  11. (saddlery) Two pieces of wood which form the arched forward part of a saddletree.
  12. The part of a key that is not inserted into the lock and that is used to turn the key.
    Coordinate term: blade
Synonyms
  • (bow-shaped bend): arc, bend, curve
  • (tool for playing stringed instruments): fiddlestick
  • (a type of stringed instrument): musical bow
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bow (third-person singular simple present bows, present participle bowing, simple past and past participle bowed)

  1. To play music on (a stringed) instrument using a bow.
    The musician bowed his violin expertly.
  2. (intransitive) To become bent or curved.
    The shelf bowed under the weight of the books.
  3. (transitive) To make something bend or curve.
    • 1843, William H. Prescott, The History of the Conquest of Mexico
      The whole nation [] bowed their necks to the worst kind of tyranny.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To exercise powerful or controlling influence over; to bend, figuratively; to turn; to incline.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Atheism
      Adversities do more bow men’s minds to religion.
    • not to bow and bias their opinions
Derived terms
  • bower
  • diddley bower
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bowen, buwen, buȝen, from Old English būgan, from Proto-West Germanic *beugan, from Proto-Germanic *beuganą, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūgʰ- (to bend). Cognate with Dutch buigen, German biegen, Danish bue.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bou, IPA(key): /baʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ
  • Homophone: bough

Verb

bow (third-person singular simple present bows, present participle bowing, simple past and past participle bowed)

  1. (intransitive) To bend oneself as a gesture of respect or deference.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
      The soldier now blew upon a green whistle, and at once a young girl, dressed in a pretty green silk gown, entered the room. She had lovely green hair and green eyes, and she bowed low before Dorothy as she said, “Follow me and I will show you your room.”
  2. (transitive and intransitive) To debut.
    • 2010 (publication date), Kara Krekeler, “Rebuilding the opera house”, West End Word, volume 39, number 26, December 22, 2010 – January 11, 2011, page 1:
      SCP recently announced that How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical will bow on the newly renovated stage next December.
  3. (intransitive) To defer (to something).
  4. (transitive) To give a direction, indication, or command to by bowing.
Hypernyms
  • (gesture): gesture; congee, congé, conge
Derived terms
Related terms
  • buxom
Translations

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. A gesture, usually showing respect, made by inclining the head or bending forward at the waist; a reverence
    He made a polite bow as he entered the room.
Hypernyms
  • (gesture): gesture; congee, congé, conge
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English bowe, bowgh, a borrowing from Middle Low German bôch and/or Middle Dutch boech, from Proto-Germanic *bōguz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵʰus (arm). Cognate with Dutch boeg (bow), Danish bov (bow), Swedish bog (bow). Doublet of bough.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bou, IPA(key): /baʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ
  • Homophone: bough

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. (nautical) The front of a boat or ship.
  2. (rowing) The rower that sits in the seat closest to the bow of the boat.
Synonyms
  • (of a ship): prow
Antonyms
  • (of a ship): poop, stern
Derived terms
  • bow rudder
  • bow shock
  • shot across the bow, shot across the bows
Usage notes
  • Often used in the plural, the ship being considered to have starboard and port bows, meeting at the stern.
Translations

Etymology 4

See bough.

Noun

bow (plural bows)

  1. (obsolete spelling of, en, bough)

See also

  • coll’arco
  • curtsy
  • kowtow
  • Wikipedia article on bows (weapons)
  • Wikipedia article on bows used to play string instruments
  • Wikipedia article on bows (the knots)
  • Wikipedia article on musical bows
  • Wikipedia article on bows, the gestures of respect
  • Wikipedia article on the bows of ships
  • Bow in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • WBO, Wob

Sranan Tongo

Etymology

From Dutch bouwen (to build).

Verb

bow

  1. to build
  2. (figuratively, with tapu) to trust, to depend on

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /boːf/

Noun

bōw f (plural bowa)

  1. woman
  2. wife


English

Etymology

From Middle English submitten, borrowed from Latin submittere, infinitive of submittō (place under, yield), from sub (under, from below, up) + mitto (to send). Compare upsend.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: səbmĭtʹ, IPA(key): /səbˈmɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt
  • Hyphenation: sub‧mit

Verb

submit (third-person singular simple present submits, present participle submitting, simple past and past participle submitted)

  1. (intransitive) To yield or give way to another.
    They will not submit to the destruction of their rights.
  2. (transitive) To yield (something) to another, as when defeated.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To enter or put forward for approval, consideration, marking etc.
    • 1843, Thomas Macaulay, Sir James Mackintosh’s History of the Revolution
      We submit that a wooden spoon of our day would not be justified in calling Galileo and Napier blockheads because they never heard of the differential calculus.
  4. (transitive) To subject; to put through a process.
  5. (transitive, mixed martial arts) To win a fight against (an opponent) by submission.
    • Okamoto, Brett (December 28, 2013), “Ronda Rousey wins with arm bar”, in (please provide the title of the work)[1], ESPN.com, retrieved January 6, 2014
      “[Ronda] Rousey, a former U.S. Olympian in Judo, caps off a perfect year in which she submitted Liz Carmouche in the first-ever UFC female fight and coached opposite [Miesha] Tate in “The Ultimate Fighter” reality series.”
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To let down; to lower.
    • 1662, John Dryden, Poem to the Lord Chancellor Hyde
      Sometimes the hill submits itself a while.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To put or place under.
    • 1611, George Chapman, Homer’s Iliads
      The bristled throat / Of the submitted sacrifice with ruthless steel he cut.

Derived terms

  • submittable
  • submittal
  • submitter

Related terms

  • submission
  • submissive
  • mission

Translations

Further reading

  • submit in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • submit in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • submit at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • tumbis

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