bowl vs stadium what difference

what is difference between bowl and stadium

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bəʊɫ/, [bɔʊɫ]
  • (US) IPA(key): /boʊɫ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊl

Etymology 1

From Middle English bolle, from Old English bolla, bolle (bowl, cup, pot, beaker, measure), from Proto-West Germanic *bollā, from Proto-Germanic *bullǭ (ball, round vessel, bowl).

Cognate with North Frisian bol (bun, bread roll), Middle Low German bolle, bole (round object), Dutch bol (ball, sphere, scoop, dot), German Bolle (bulb), Danish bolle (bowl, bread roll), Icelandic bolli (cup).

Noun

bowl (plural bowls)

  1. A roughly hemispherical container used to hold, mix or present food, such as salad, fruit or soup, or other items.
  2. As much as is held by a bowl.
  3. A dish comprising a mix of different foods, not all of which need be cooked, served in a bowl.
  4. A haircut in which straight hair is cut at an even height around the edges, forming a bowl shape.
  5. The round hollow part of anything.
    Direct the cleaning fluid around the toilet bowl and under the rim.
    1. The part of a spoon that holds content, as opposed to the handle.
    2. A part of a pipe or bong packed with marijuana for smoking
      Let’s smoke a bowl!
    3. (typography) A rounded portion of a glyph that encloses empty space, as in the letters d and o.
  6. A round crater (or similar) in the ground.
  7. (sports, theater) An elliptical-shaped stadium or amphitheater resembling a bowl.
  8. (American football) A postseason football competition, a bowl game (i.e. Rose Bowl, Super Bowl)
Synonyms
  • (as much as is held by a bowl): bowlful
  • (haircut): bowl cut, pudding bowl
  • (crater): crater, hollow
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bowle, boule, from Old French boule (ball), from Latin bulla (bubble, stud, round object). Doublet of poll.

Noun

bowl (plural bowls)

  1. The ball rolled by players in the game of lawn bowls.
  2. The action of bowling a ball.
  3. (in the plural, but used with a singular verb) The game of bowls.
    Synonyms: lawn bowls, lawn bowling
Translations

Verb

bowl (third-person singular simple present bowls, present participle bowling, simple past and past participle bowled)

  1. (transitive) To roll or throw (a ball) in the correct manner in cricket and similar games and sports.
  2. (intransitive) To throw the ball (in cricket and similar games and sports).
  3. To roll or carry smoothly on, or as on, wheels.
  4. To pelt or strike with anything rolled.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Danish: bowle
  • Dutch: bowlen
Translations

Anagrams

  • Blow, b’low, blow


English

Etymology

From Latin stadium (a measure of length, a race course) (commonly one-eighth of a Roman mile; translated in early English Bibles by furlong), from Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion, a measure of length, a running track), especially the track at Olympia, which was one stadium in length. The Greek word may literally mean “fixed standard of length” (from στάδιος (stádios, firm, fixed), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-, whence also stand and Latin stare).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsteɪ.di.əm/
  • Hyphenation: sta‧di‧um

Noun

stadium (plural stadiums or stadia)

  1. A venue where sporting events are held.
  2. An Ancient Greek racecourse, especially, the Olympic course for foot races.
  3. (now historical) A Greek measure of length, being the chief one used for itinerary distances, also adopted by the Romans for nautical and astronomical measurements, equal to 600 Greek or 625 Roman feet, or 125 Roman paces, or to 606 feet, 9 inches.
    • , II.ii.3:
      Dionysiodorus [] sent a letter ad superos after he was dead, from the centre of the earth, to signify what distance the same centre was from the superficies of the same, viz. 42,000 stadiums […].
  4. A kind of telemeter for measuring the distance of an object of known dimensions, by observing the angle it subtends.
  5. (surveying) a graduated rod used to measure the distance of the place where it stands from an instrument having a telescope, by observing the number of the graduations of the rod that are seen between certain parallel wires (stadia wires) in the field of view of the telescope.
  6. (biology) A life stage of an organism.

Usage notes

  • The alternative plural stadia is occasionally used, chiefly in high-register contexts.

Synonyms

  • (venue where sporting events are held): arena
  • (Greek unit of length): Olympic stadium
  • (graduated rod in surveying): stadia, stadia rod

Derived terms

  • stadia rod
  • stadia wire

Translations

References

  • stadium in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Czech

Alternative forms

  • stádium

Noun

stadium n

  1. stage, phase

See also

  • fáze f

Further reading

  • stadium in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • stadium in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Etymology

From Latin stadium (a measure of length, a race course) (commonly one-eighth of a Roman mile; translated in early English Bibles by furlong), from Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion, a measure of length, a running track), especially the track at Olympia, which was one stadium in length. The Greek word may literally mean “fixed standard of length” (from στάδιος (stádios, firm, fixed), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-, whence also stand).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: sta‧di‧um

Noun

stadium n (plural stadiums or stadia, diminutive stadiumpje n)

  1. A stadium.
  2. A stage; a phase.

Usage notes

  • Stadium is a learned term used in certain proper nouns such as Yankee Stadium. The standard Dutch term is stadion.

Related terms

  • stadion

Latin

Etymology

From the Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈsta.di.um/, [ˈs̠t̪äd̪iʊ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈsta.di.um/, [ˈst̪ɑːd̪ium]

Noun

stadium n (genitive stadiī or stadī); second declension

  1. stade (distance of 125 paces)
  2. racecourse (athletics)

Declension

Second-declension noun (neuter).

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Synonyms

  • (measure of distance): stadiī (plurale tantum)

Derived terms

  • stadiālis
  • stadiātus

Related terms

  • stadiodromos

References

  • stadium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • stadium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • stadium in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • stadium in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]
  • stadium in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • stadium in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Malay

Etymology

From English stadium, from Latin stadium, from Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion), from στάδιος (stádios), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-.

Pronunciation

  • (Johor-Selangor) IPA(key): /stadiom/
  • (Riau-Lingga) IPA(key): /stadiʊm/
  • Rhymes: -iom, -jom, -om

Noun

stadium

  1. stadium (venue where sporting events are held)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion), via Latin stadium

Noun

stadium n (definite singular stadiet, indefinite plural stadier, definite plural stadia or stadiene)

  1. a stage (of a process or development)

See also

  • stadion

References

  • “stadium” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Ancient Greek στάδιον (stádion), via Latin stadium

Noun

stadium n (definite singular stadiet, indefinite plural stadium, definite plural stadia)

  1. a stage (of a process or development)

See also

  • stadion

References

  • “stadium” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

From Latin stadium, from Ancient Greek στᾰ́δῐον (stádion).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //ˈstad.jum//

Noun

stadium n

  1. stage, phase

Declension

Synonyms

  • faza

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