box vs corner what difference

what is difference between box and corner

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɒks/
  • (General American) enPR: bäks, IPA(key): /bɑks/
  • Rhymes: -ɒks

Etymology 1

From Middle English box (jar (usually cylindrical); type of container; strongbox for valuables or its contents; cupping glass for bloodletting; bone socket), from Old English box (box-tree; box, case), from Proto-West Germanic *buhsā (box tree; thing made from boxwood; box), either from Latin buxus (box tree; thing made from boxwood), buxum (box tree; boxwood) (possibly from πύξος (púxos, box tree; boxwood)); or from Late Latin buxis (box), Latin pyxis (small box for medicines or toiletries) (from Ancient Greek πυξίς (puxís, box or tablet made of boxwood; box; cylinder), from πύξος (púxos) + -ῐς (-is, suffix forming feminine nouns)).

If the latter derivation is correct, the word is cognate with Middle Dutch bosse, busse (jar; tin; round box) (modern Dutch bos (wood, forest), bus (container, box; bushing of a wheel)), Old High German buhsa (Middle High German buhse, bühse, modern German Büchse (box; can)), Swedish hjulbössa (wheel-box).

The humorous plural form boxen is from box + -en, by analogy with oxen.

Noun

box (plural boxes or (nonstandard, computing, humorous) boxen)

  1. Senses relating to a three-dimensional object or space.
    1. A cuboid space; a cuboid container, often with a hinged lid.
      Synonyms: case, package
    2. A cuboid container and its contents; as much as fills such a container.
      Synonym: boxful
    3. A compartment (as a drawer) of an item of furniture used for storage, such as a cupboard, a shelf, etc.
    4. A compartment or receptacle for receiving items.
      1. A numbered receptacle at a newspaper office for anonymous replies to advertisements; see also box number.
    5. A compartment to sit inside in an auditorium, courtroom, theatre, or other building.
      Synonym: loge
    6. The driver’s seat on a horse-drawn coach.
      Synonym: box seat
    7. A small rectangular shelter.
      Synonyms: shelter, booth
    8. Short for horsebox (container for transporting horses).
    9. (rail transport) Short for signal box.
    10. (figuratively) A predicament or trap.
    11. (slang) A prison cell.
      • 1951, William S. Burroughs, in Harris (ed.), Letters 1945–59, Penguin 2009, p. 98:
        While sojourning in the box I was greatly impressed by the kindness and decency of the Mexican people.
      1. (slang) A cell used for solitary confinement.
        Synonym: hole
        • 2003, Elayne Rapping, Law and Justice as Seen on TV (page 83)
          He is fearless and contemptuous, apparently able to withstand any discipline—including nights “in the box []
        • 2009, Megan McLemore, Barred from Treatment
          He had been in disciplinary confinement (“the box”)—punishment reserved for serious prison offenses—for 14 months.
        • 2020, Erin Hatton, Coerced: Work Under Threat of Punishment (page 89)
          [] he explained, “you can go to the box. So, I got a ticket for refusing an order and I went to the box in that situation. []
    12. (euphemistic) A coffin.
    13. (slang) Preceded by the: television.
      Synonyms: (Britain) telly, tube, TV
    14. (slang, vulgar) The vagina.
      Synonyms: see Thesaurus:vagina
    15. (computing, slang) A computer, or the case in which it is housed.
      Synonyms: computer, machine
    16. (cricket) A hard protector for the genitals worn inside the underpants by a batsman or close fielder.
      Synonym: (US) cup
    17. (cricket) Synonym of gully (a certain fielding position)
    18. (engineering) A cylindrical casing around the axle of a wheel, a bearing, a gland, etc.
    19. (fencing) A device used in electric fencing to detect whether a weapon has struck an opponent, which connects to a fencer’s weapon by a spool and body wire. It uses lights and sound to notify a hit, with different coloured lights for on target and off target hits.
    20. (dated) A small country house.
      • 1782, Frances Burney, Cecilia, III.vi.9:
        “I dare say the sheriff, or the mayor and corporation, or some of those sort of people, would give him money enough, for the use of it, to run him up a mighty pretty neat little box somewhere near Richmond.”
  2. Senses relating to a two-dimensional object or space
    1. A rectangle: an oblong or a square.
    2. (baseball) The rectangle in which the batter stands.
    3. (genetics) One of two specific regions in a promoter.
    4. (juggling) A pattern usually performed with three balls where the movements of the balls make a boxlike shape.
    5. (lacrosse, informal) Short for box lacrosse (indoor form of lacrosse).
    6. (soccer) The penalty area.
Usage notes
  • (computing): the humorous plural form boxen is occasionally used.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
Translations
See also
  • tofu (empty box displayed by some computer systems in place of a character not supported by available fonts)

Verb

box (third-person singular simple present boxes, present participle boxing, simple past and past participle boxed)

  1. (transitive) To place inside a box; to pack in one or more boxes.
  2. (transitive) Usually followed by in: to surround and enclose in a way that restricts movement; to corner, to hem in.
  3. (transitive) To mix two containers of paint of similar colour to ensure that the color is identical.
  4. (transitive, agriculture) To make an incision or hole in (a tree) for the purpose of procuring the sap.
  5. (transitive, architecture) To enclose with boarding, lathing, etc., so as to conceal (for example, pipes) or to bring to a required form.
  6. (transitive, engineering) To furnish (for example, the axle of a wheel) with a box.
  7. (transitive, graphic design, printing) To enclose (images, text, etc.) in a box.
  8. (transitive, object-oriented programming) To place a value of a primitive type into a corresponding object.
Synonyms
  • (to place inside a box): box up, case, embox, encase, pack, pack up, package
Antonyms
  • (place inside a box): unbox, uncase, unpack
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English box (box tree; boxwood), from Old English box (box tree), from Proto-West Germanic *buhs (box tree; thing made from boxwood), from Latin buxus (box tree; thing made from boxwood), buxum (box tree; boxwood), possibly from πύξος (púxos, box tree; boxwood).

Noun

box (plural boxes)

  1. Any of various evergreen shrubs or trees of the genus Buxus, especially the common box, European box, or boxwood (Buxus sempervirens) which is often used for making hedges and topiary.
  2. The wood from a box tree: boxwood.
  3. (music, slang) A musical instrument, especially one made from boxwood.
  4. (Australia) An evergreen tree of the genus Lophostemon (for example, the box scrub, Brisbane box, brush box, pink box, or Queensland box, Lophostemon confertus).
  5. (Australia) Various species of Eucalyptus trees are popularly called various kinds of boxes, on the basis of the nature of their wood, bark, or appearance for example, the drooping (Eucalyptus bicolor), shiny-leaved (Eucalyptus tereticornis), black, or ironbark box trees.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English box (a blow; a stroke with a weapon); further origin uncertain. The following etymologies have been suggested:

  • Possibly related to Proto-Germanic *boki-, whence Danish bask (a blow; a stripe), Danish baske (to flap, move around, beat violently), Middle Dutch boke (a blow, a hit), bōken (to slap, strike) (modern Dutch beuken (to slap)), West Frisian bûtse, bûtsje (to slap), Saterland Frisian batsje (to slap), Low German betschen (to slap, beat with a flat hand), Middle High German buc (a blow, a stroke), bochen (to slap, strike).
  • Possibly onomatopoeic.
  • Possibly from box (“cuboid space; container”), perhaps referring to the shape of the fist.
  • Possibly from Ancient Greek πύξ (púx, with clenched fist), πυγμή (pugmḗ, fist; boxing).

The verb is from Middle English boxen (to beat or whip (an animal)), which is derived from the noun.

Noun

box (plural boxes)

  1. A blow with the fist.
Synonyms
  • blow
  • cuff
  • punch
Translations

Verb

box (third-person singular simple present boxes, present participle boxing, simple past and past participle boxed)

  1. (transitive) To strike with the fists; to punch.
  2. (transitive, boxing) To fight against (a person) in a boxing match.
  3. (intransitive, boxing) To participate in boxing; to be a boxer.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • French: boxer
  • Galician: boxear
  • German: boxen
  • Portuguese: boxear, boxar
  • Spanish: boxear
Translations

Etymology 4

From Latin bōx, from Ancient Greek βῶξ (bôx, box (marine fish)), from βοῦς (boûs, ox) + ὤψ (ṓps, eye, view), a reference to the large size of the fish’s eyes relative to its body.

Noun

box (plural boxes)

  1. (dated) A Mediterranean food fish of the genus Boops, which is a variety of sea bream; a bogue or oxeye.
Translations

References

Further reading

  • box on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • box (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • box at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • BXO, OBX

Czech

Noun

box m

  1. boxing (the sport of boxing)

Declension

Related terms

  • boxér
  • boxérky
  • boxovat

Further reading

  • box in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • box in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English box.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔks/
  • Hyphenation: box
  • Rhymes: -ɔks
  • Homophone: boks

Noun

box m (plural boxen, diminutive boxje n)

  1. speaker, loudspeaker
    Synonyms: luidspreker, speaker
  2. playpen
  3. compartment for livestock

French

Etymology

From English box. Doublet of boîte.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔks/

Noun

box m (plural box or boxes)

  1. stall (for a horse), loose box
  2. compartment, cubicle
  3. garage, lock-up (for a car)
Derived terms
  • box des accusés

Further reading

  • “box” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Noun

box f (plural box)

  1. Electronic equipment used for internet access (component of the digital subscriber line technology)

Hungarian

Noun

box

  1. Misspelling of boksz.

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɔxs/

Noun

box n (genitive singular box, nominative plural box)

  1. box (container)
    Synonym: kassi
  2. (sports) boxing
    Synonym: hnefaleikar

Declension

Derived terms

  • boxa
  • boxhanski
  • nestisbox

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English box.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔks/

Noun

box m (invariable)

  1. horsebox
  2. garage, lock-up (for a car)
  3. (motor racing) pit
  4. playpen

Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek βώξ (bṓx).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /boːks/, [boːks̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /boks/, [bɔks]

Noun

bōx m (genitive bōcis); third declension

  1. A kind of marine fish

Declension

Third-declension noun.

References

  • box in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • box in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • box in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • boxe

Etymology

From Old English box, from Proto-West Germanic *buhsā.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔks/
  • Rhymes: -ɔks

Noun

box (plural boxs)

  1. A cylindrical jar.
  2. A case, container or strongbox.

Descendants

  • English: box (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: box

References

  • “box, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *buhs.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /boks/

Noun

box m

  1. box
  2. box tree

Declension

Derived terms

  • boxtrēow
  • byxen
  • ġewyrtbox
  • sāpbox
  • sealfbox

Descendants

  • Middle English: box, boxe
    • English: box (see there for further descendants)
    • Scots: box

Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • boxe (prescriptive)

Etymology

Borrowed from English box.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔks/

Noun

box m (Brazil) or f (Portugal) (plural boxes) (proscribed)

  1. stall (for a horse)
  2. electronic equipment used for internet access (component of the digital subscriber line technology)
  3. (Brazil) the curtain or glass panes which separate the shower from the rest of the bathroom; shower stall
    • 2003, Eileen G. de Paiva e Mello, Questão de Tempo, Thesaurus Editora, page 150:
      A mais velha procurava arrancar a cortina do box, pendurando-se nela!

      The oldest one wanted to pull off the stall curtain by hanging to it!

Derived terms

  • encostar às boxes

Romanian

Etymology 1

From French boxe.

Noun

box n (plural boxuri)

  1. (sports) boxing (the sport of)
  2. A kind of sword.
Synonyms
  • (the sport): pugilat, pugilism, pugilistică

Etymology 2

From French box.

Noun

box

  1. bovine leather

Etymology 3

Noun

box

  1. A breed of bulldog.

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English box. Doublet of buje.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈboks/, [ˈboks]

Noun

box m (plural boxes)

  1. boxing (sport)
  2. (motor racing) pit
  3. (sports) box

Derived terms

  • calle de boxes
  • parada en boxes
  • parar en boxes

Further reading

  • “box” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • Homophone: bocks

Noun

box c

  1. box, crate; a cuboid container

Declension

Derived terms

  • frysbox
  • kylbox
  • postbox


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɔɹnɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɔːnə(ɹ)/
  • Hyphenation: cor‧ner
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)nə(ɹ)

Etymology

From Middle English corner, from Anglo-Norman cornere (compare Old French cornier, corniere (corner)), from Old French corne (corner, angle, literally a horn, projecting point), from Vulgar Latin *corna (horn), from Latin cornua, plural of cornū (projecting point, end, horn). More at hirn.

Noun

corner (plural corners)

  1. The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal.
    1. The space in the angle between converging lines or walls which meet in a point.
    2. The projection into space of an angle in a solid object.
    3. An intersection of two streets; any of the four outer points off the street at that intersection.
    4. (attributive) Denoting a premises that is in a convenient local location, notionally, but not necessarily literally, on the corner of two streets.
  2. An edge or extremity; the part farthest from the center; hence, any quarter or part, or the direction in which it lies.
    • c. 1596-1598, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act 2, Scene 7:
      Why, that’s the lady: all the world desires her; / From the four corners of the earth they come, / To kiss this shrine, this mortal-breathing saint:
  3. A secret or secluded place; a remote or out of the way place; a nook.
  4. An embarrassing situation; a difficulty.
  5. (business, finance) A sufficient interest in a salable security or commodity to allow the cornering party to influence prices.
  6. (heading) Relating to the playing field.
    1. (baseball) One of the four vertices of the strike zone.
    2. (baseball) First base or third base.
    3. (soccer) A corner kick.
    4. (American football) A cornerback.
    5. (boxing) The corner of the ring, which is where the boxer rests before and during a fight.
    6. (boxing, by extension) The group of people who assist a boxer during a bout.
  7. A place where people meet for a particular purpose.
  8. (obsolete) A point scored in a rubber at whist.
Quotations
  • 2006, Kelly K. Chappell, Effects of Concept-based Instruction on Calculus Students’ Acquisition of Conceptual Understanding and Procedural Skill, in John Dossey, Solomon Friedberg, Glenda Lappan, W. James Lewis (editorial committee), Research in Collegiate Mathematics Education VI, page 41,
    Of the students enrolled in a traditional learning environment, 65% (42 of 65) correctly answered that the function




    f
    (
    x
    )
    =

    |

    x

    3

    |

    +
    4


    {\displaystyle f(x)=|x-3|+4}

    was not differentiable (or had no derivative) at




    x
    =
    3


    {\displaystyle x=3}

    .Of those, 55% (23 of 42) argued that a function did not have a derivative at a corner.

Synonyms
Derived terms
Descendants
  • German: Corner
  • Japanese: コーナー (kōnā)
Translations

Verb

corner (third-person singular simple present corners, present participle cornering, simple past and past participle cornered)

  1. (transitive) To drive (someone or something) into a corner or other confined space.
    • 2013 June 18, Simon Romero, “Protests Widen as Brazilians Chide Leaders,” New York Times (retrieved 21 June 2013):
      In Juazeiro do Norte, demonstrators cornered the mayor inside a bank for hours and called for his impeachment, while thousands of others protested teachers’ salaries.
  2. (transitive) To trap in a position of great difficulty or hopeless embarrassment.
  3. (transitive) To put (someone) in an awkward situation.
  4. (finance, business, transitive) To get sufficient command of (a stock, commodity, etc.), so as to be able to manipulate its price.
  5. (automotive, transitive) To turn a corner or drive around a curve.
  6. (automotive, intransitive) To handle while moving around a corner in a road or otherwise turning.
  7. (transitive) To supply with corners.
    • 1937, Mechanical World and Engineering Record (volume 102, page 208)
      Tool for cornering and cutting off copper switch blades
Translations

Catalan

Noun

corner m (plural corners)

  1. snowy mespilus (Amelanchier ovalis)

French

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English corner.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔʁ.nœʁ/

Noun

corner m (plural corners)

  1. (soccer) corner kick, corner
Synonyms
  • coup de pied de coin

Etymology 2

corne +‎ -er

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔʁ.ne/

Verb

corner

  1. to fold a corner of a page
  2. to blow, horn (a cornet or horn)
  3. to bellow
  4. to honk, beep (a vehicle’s horn)
  5. to shout from the rooftops
Conjugation

Further reading

  • “corner” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English corner.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔr.ner/

Noun

corner m

  1. (soccer) corner
  2. (figuratively) difficult situation
  3. (economics) market niche in which a company has a monopoly

References


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • cornere, korner, cornare, cornyere
  • cornel, cornelle

Etymology

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman cornere.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔrnər(ə)/, /ˈkɔrneːr(ə)/

Noun

corner (plural corneres)

  1. A corner or angle; an intersection of two objects where both terminate.
  2. The interior or inside of a corner.
  3. A refuge or redoubt; a location of safety.
  4. A place, especially a faraway or distant one.
  5. (rare) A overlook or viewpoint.
  6. (rare) The side of a troop or host.

Derived terms

  • cornered
  • corner stoon

Descendants

  • English: corner
  • Scots: corner
  • Yola: curneale, kurneal

References

  • “cornẹ̄̆r, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-08.

Old French

Verb

corner

  1. to blow; to horn (sound a horn)

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-rns, *-rnt are modified to rz, rt. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.


Spanish

Noun

corner m (plural corneres)

  1. corner kick

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