boyfriend vs fellow what difference

what is difference between boyfriend and fellow

English

Alternative forms

  • boy friend (dated)
  • boy-friend (dated)

Etymology

From boy +‎ friend.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbɔɪˌfɹɛnd/, /ˈbɔɪfɹənd/

Noun

boyfriend (plural boyfriends)

  1. A male partner in an unmarried romantic relationship.
    Coordinate terms: fiancé, girlfriend, husband, lover, significant other
  2. A male friend.
    Synonyms: (slang) guyfriend, buddy, pal, mate; see also Thesaurus:friend

Usage notes

In contrast to its female equivalent, girlfriend, which is also often used to describe a woman’s close female friends, the term is not that often used in reference to non-romantic relationships. Boyfriend is a relatively modern term, and in the past has had implications of an illicit relationship (as sexual and romantic relationships outside marriage were more commonly frowned upon). It is now a generally accepted term and has no negative implications per se.

An adult man in a non-marital relationship is sometimes referred to instead as a significant other or partner, especially if the two partners are living together. Because boyfriend and partner mean different things to different people, the distinctions between the terms are subjective, and which term is used in a relationship will ultimately be determined by personal preference.

Separating the word into its two components boy friend avoids the romantic implication nowadays, although boy friend used to mean the same as boyfriend does now. However, British and Australian men usually refer to a male friend as a mate. Similarly, Americans and Canadians use the term buddy.

Derived terms

  • boyfriendable

Descendants

  • Hindi: बॉयफ़्रेंड (bŏyfreṇḍ)
  • Japanese: ボーイフレンド (bōifurendo)
  • Korean: 보이프렌드 (boipeurendeu)
  • Russian: бойфре́нд (bojfrɛ́nd)
  • Urdu: بایفْرینْڈ(bayfrenḍ)

Translations

Anagrams

  • friend boy, friendboy

Finnish

Noun

boyfriend

  1. (rare) boyfriend

Declension

Synonyms

  • poikakaveri
  • poikaystävä


English

Etymology

From Middle English felowe, felawe, felage, from Old Norse félagi (fellow, companion, associate, shareholder, colleague), from félag (partnership, literally a laying together of property), from the Germanic bases of two words represented in English by fee and law. Cognate with Scots falow, fallow, follow (associate, comrade, companion), Danish fælle (companion), Norwegian felle (companion), Faroese felagi (member, partner), Icelandic félagi (comrade, mate).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɛləʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɛloʊ/
  • (informal, nonstandard) IPA(key): /ˈfɛlə/
  • Rhymes: -ɛləʊ
  • Hyphenation: fel‧low

Noun

fellow (plural fellows)

  1. (obsolete) A colleague or partner.
  2. (archaic) A companion; a comrade.
    • 1788, Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Volume IV
      That enormous engine was flanked by two fellows almost of equal magnitude.
  3. One of a pair, or of two things used together or suited to each other; a mate.
    • When they be but heifers of one year, [] they are let goe to the fellow and breed.
  4. A person (thing, etc) comparable in characteristics:
    1. An equal in power, rank, character, etc.
    2. (chiefly attributive) A person with common characteristics, being of the same kind, or in the same group.
      • 1888, James Francis Hogan, The Irish in Australia
        writing a history of my fellow-countrymen in Australasia
    3. (Britain slang, obsolete) Synonym of schoolmate: a student at the same school.
      • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 37:
        Adrian thought it worth while to try out his new slang. ‘I say, you fellows, here’s a rum go. Old Biffo was jolly odd this morning. He gave me a lot of pi-jaw about slacking and then invited me to tea. No rotting! He did really.’
  5. (colloquial) A male person; a man.
  6. (obsolete) A man without good breeding or worth; an ignoble or mean man.
  7. (rare, usually qualified by an adjective or used in the plural) A person; an individual, regardless of gender.
    • The cut of her dress from the waist upward, both before and behind, made her figure very like a boy’s kite; and I might have pronounced her gown a little too decidedly-orange, and her gloves a little too intensely green. But she seemed to be a good sort of fellow, and showed a high regard for the Aged.
  8. A rank or title in the professional world, usually given as “Fellow”.
    1. In the English universities, a scholar who is appointed to a foundation called a fellowship, which gives a title to certain perquisites and privileges.
    2. In an American college or university, a member of the corporation which manages its business interests; also, a graduate appointed to a fellowship, who receives the income of the foundation.
    3. A member of a literary or scientific society
      a Fellow of the Royal Society
    4. The most senior rank or title one can achieve on a technical career in certain companies (though some Fellows also hold business titles such as Vice President or Chief Technology Officer). This is typically found in large corporations in research and development-intensive industries (IBM or Sun Microsystems in information technology, and Boston Scientific in Medical Devices for example). They appoint a small number of senior scientists and engineers as Fellows.
    5. In the US and Canada, a physician who is undergoing a supervised, sub-specialty medical training (fellowship) after completing a specialty training program (residency).
  9. (Aboriginal English) Used as a general intensifier.
    • 1991, Jimmy Chi, Bran Nue Dae, in Heiss & Minter, Macquarie PEN Anthology of Aboriginal Literature, Allen & Unwin 2008, p. 137:
      This fella song all about the Aboriginal people, coloured people, black people longa Australia.

Usage notes

In North America, fellow is less likely to be used for a man in general in comparison to other words that have the same purpose. Nevertheless, it is still used by some. In addition, it has a good bit of use as an academic or medical title or membership.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:associate
  • See also Thesaurus:man

Translations

Derived terms

Verb

fellow (third-person singular simple present fellows, present participle fellowing, simple past and past participle fellowed)

  1. To suit with; to pair with; to match.

References

  • “fellow”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Anagrams

  • elf owl

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