bozo vs cuckoo what difference

what is difference between bozo and cuckoo

English

Etymology

Attested since the 1910s in American English, of uncertain origin. The term may derive from Spanish bozal, a term originally for a recently-imported slave and then “someone who speaks (Spanish) poorly”. The term is older than Bozo the Clown, introduced in 1946, and derivation from French bouseux /bu.zø/, a derogative term for a farmer equivalent to “bumpkin”, in phonologically problematic.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbəʊzəʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈboʊzoʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊzəʊ

Noun

bozo (plural bozos)

  1. (slang) A stupid, foolish, or ridiculous person, especially a man. [from 1910s]

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:fool

Derived terms

  • bozo eruption
  • bozo filter
  • bozosity
  • bozotic

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • zobo

Galician

Alternative forms

  • buzo

Etymology

From Late Latin *buccĕus (relating or belonging to the mouth). See bucca for more.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈboθo̝/, (western) /ˈboso̝/

Noun

bozo m (plural bozos)

  1. muzzle
    Synonyms: boceira, embozo, vetillo
  2. pout
  3. fish mouth
  4. upper lip fluff

Derived terms

  • bozal
  • embozar

Related terms

  • boza

References

  • “bozo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “bozo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “bozo” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Spanish

Etymology

From Medieval Latin *buccĕus (relating or belonging to the mouth). See bucca for more.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈboθo/, [ˈbo.θo]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈboso/, [ˈbo.so]

Noun

bozo m (plural bozos)

  1. down (on the upper lip)
  2. muzzle, mouth (exterior part of the mouth)
  3. halter (for leading horses)

Related terms

See also

  • lanugo
  • vello

Yami

Noun

bozo

  1. ball


English

Etymology

From Middle English cokkou, probably from Old French cucu (whence French coucou); ultimately onomatopoeic, perhaps via Latin cucūlus (cuckoo). Displaced native Old English ġēac (> modern English yeke, yek (cuckoo)).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkʊk.uː/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkuː.kuː/
  • Hyphenation: cuc‧koo

Noun

cuckoo (countable and uncountable, plural cuckoos)

  1. Any of various birds, of the family Cuculidae, famous for laying its eggs in the nests of other species; but especially the common cuckoo, Cuculus canorus, that has a characteristic two-note call.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act V Scene 1
      He knows me, as the blind man knows the cuckoo, / By the bad voice.
  2. The sound of that particular bird.
  3. The bird-shaped figure found in cuckoo clocks.
  4. The cuckoo clock itself.
  5. A person who inveigles themselves into a place where they should not be (used especially in the phrase a cuckoo in the nest).
  6. (slang) Someone who is crazy.
  7. Alternative form of coo-coo (Barbadian food)

Related terms

  • cuckoo clock
  • cuckoo-dove
  • cuckoo-pint (Arum italicum)
  • cuckoo shrike
  • cuckoo’s egg
  • cloud-cuckoo-land
  • cuculine (rare)
  • cuckoo sign

Translations

Verb

cuckoo (third-person singular simple present cuckoos, present participle cuckooing, simple past and past participle cuckooed)

  1. To make the call of a cuckoo.
  2. To repeat something incessantly. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
    Synonym: parrot

Translations

Adjective

cuckoo (comparative more cuckoo, superlative most cuckoo)

  1. (slang) Crazy; not sane.

Derived terms

  • cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs
  • cuckooness

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