brace vs pair what difference

what is difference between brace and pair

English

Etymology

From Middle English brace, from Old French brace (arm), from Latin bracchia, the nominative and accusative plural of bracchium (arm).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɹeɪs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Noun

brace (plural braces)

  1. (obsolete) Armor for the arm; vambrace.
  2. (obsolete) A measurement of length, originally representing a person’s outstretched arms.
  3. A curved instrument or handle of iron or wood, for holding and turning bits, etc.; a bitstock.
  4. That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop.
  5. A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension.
  6. A thong used to regulate the tension of a drum.
    • 1713, William Derham, Physico-Theology
      The little bones of the ear drum do in straining and relaxing it as the braces of the war drum do in that.
  7. The state of being braced or tight; tension.
    • 1669, William Holder, Elements of Speech
      the laxness of the tympanum, when it has lost its brace or tension
  8. Harness; warlike preparation.
  9. (typography) A curved, pointed line, also known as “curly bracket”: { or } connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be considered together, such as in {role, roll}; in music, used to connect staves.
  10. A pair, a couple; originally used of dogs, and later of animals generally (e.g., a brace of conies) and then other things, but rarely human persons. (The plural in this sense is unchanged.) In British use (as plural), this is a particularly common reference to game birds.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 5 scene 1
      But you, my brace of lords, were I so minded,
      I here could pluck his highness’ frown upon you,
      And justify you traitors
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The Church History of Britain
      A brace of brethren, both bishops, both eminent for learning and religion, now appeared in the church
    • 1859, George Meredith, The Ordeal of Richard Feverel, Chapter 5:
      “Are you a prime shot?'” said Richard.
      Ripton nodded knowingly, and answered, “Pretty good.”
      “Then ww’ll have a dozen brase apiece today,” said Richard.
  11. A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure; any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell.
  12. (nautical) A rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which the yard is moved horizontally; also, a rudder gudgeon.
  13. (Britain, Cornwall, mining) The mouth of a shaft.
  14. (Britain, chiefly in the plural) Straps or bands to sustain trousers; suspenders.
  15. (plural in North America, singular or plural in the UK) A system of wires, brackets, and elastic bands used to correct crooked teeth or to reduce overbite.
  16. (soccer) Two goals scored by one player in a game.

Synonyms

  • (measure of length representing a person’s outstretched arms): fathom
  • (pair, couple): dyad, twosome; see also Thesaurus:duo

Derived terms

  • curly brace
  • embrace

Translations

Verb

brace (third-person singular simple present braces, present participle bracing, simple past and past participle braced)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To prepare for something bad, such as an impact or blow.
    All hands, brace for impact!
    Brace yourself!
    The boy has no idea about everything that’s been going on. You need to brace him for what’s about to happen.
  2. To place in a position for resisting pressure; to hold firmly.
    He braced himself against the crowd.
  3. (nautical) To swing round the yards of a square rigged ship, using braces, to present a more efficient sail surface to the direction of the wind.
    to brace the yards
  4. To stop someone for questioning, usually said of police.
  5. To confront with questions, demands or requests.
    • 1980, Stephen King, The Wedding Gig
      Just about then the young kid who had braced us when we came in uttered a curse and made for the door.
  6. To furnish with braces; to support; to prop.
    to brace a beam in a building
  7. To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to strengthen.
    to brace the nerves
    • 1825, Thomas Campbell, Hallowed Ground
      And welcome war to brace her drums.
  8. To bind or tie closely; to fasten tightly.
    • The women of China [] , by bracing and binding them [their feet] from their infancy, have very little feet.
    • 1815, Walter Scott, Lord of the Isles
      some who spurs had first braced on

Synonyms

  • (strengthen): See also Thesaurus:strengthen

Translations

Related terms

  • brace aback
  • brace about
  • brace abox
  • brace by
  • brace in
  • brace oneself
  • brace sharp
  • brace of shakes

Anagrams

  • acerb, caber, cabre, cabré

Italian

Alternative forms

  • brage, bragia, bracia (archaic or regional)

Etymology

Perhaps from Gothic *???????????????????? (*brasa, glowing coal), from Proto-Germanic *brasō (gleed, crackling coal), Proto-Indo-European *bʰres- (to crack, break, burst). Cognate with French braise (embers), Swedish brasa (to roast), Icelandic brasa (to harden by fire).
Most probably cognate to Sanskrit भ्रज (bhrája, fire).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbra.t͡ʃe/
  • Hyphenation: brà‧ce

Noun

brace f (plural braci)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) embers

Derived terms

  • braciaio
  • braciaiola
  • braciere
  • bracino
  • braciola

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French brace, from Latin bracchia, plural of bracchium.

Alternative forms

  • brase, braas, bras

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbraːs(ə)/

Noun

brace (uncountable)

  1. Vambrace; armour which protects the arm.
  2. A cord or brace for fastening or attaching things to something.
  3. A group or set of two dogs or canines.
  4. Wood used as a buttress or support for building.
  5. (rare) A support or buttress used in other applications.
  6. (rare) A kind of riding equipment or horse tack.
  7. (rare) A peninsula; a cape or slice of land jutting into the sea.
  8. (rare) A perch (unit of measure)
  9. (rare) A point of a cross or rood.
Derived terms
  • bracen
  • bracer
  • brasyng
  • rerebrace
  • vambrace
Descendants
  • English: brace
  • Scots: brace
References
  • “brāce, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-08-11.

Etymology 2

Verb

brace

  1. Alternative form of bracen

Etymology 3

Noun

brace

  1. Alternative form of bras

Old French

Etymology

From Latin brachia, bracchia, originally the plural of bracchium.

Noun

brace f (oblique plural braces, nominative singular brace, nominative plural braces)

  1. arm (limb)

Related terms

  • bras

Descendants

  • Middle English: brace, brase, braas, bras
    • English: brace
    • Scots: brace

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (brace)

Romanian

Alternative forms

  • braci

Etymology

From Latin brācae, plural of brāca.

Noun

brace f pl (plural only)

  1. (rare, Bukovina) underwear, undergarments, drawers, unmentionables

Declension

Synonyms

  • indispensabili, chiloți, izmene

Related terms

  • îmbrăca


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: pâr, IPA(key): /pɛə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) enPR: pâr, IPA(key): /pɛɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛə(ɹ)
  • Homophones: pare, pear

Etymology 1

From Middle English paire, from Old French paire, from Latin paria (equals), neuter plural of pār.

Noun

pair (plural pairs or (archaic or dialectal) pair)

  1. Two similar or identical things taken together; often followed by of.
    1. One of the constituent items that make up a pair.
  2. Two people in a relationship, partnership or friendship.
  3. Used with binary nouns (often in the plural to indicate multiple instances, since such nouns are plural only, except in some technical contexts)
  4. A couple of working animals attached to work together, as by a yoke.
  5. (card games) A poker hand that contains two cards of identical rank, which cannot also count as a better hand.
  6. (cricket) A score of zero runs (a duck) in both innings of a two-innings match.
    Synonyms: pair of spectacles, spectacles
  7. (baseball, informal) A double play, two outs recorded in one play.
  8. (baseball, informal) A doubleheader, two games played on the same day between the same teams
  9. (rowing) A boat for two sweep rowers.
  10. (slang) A pair of breasts
  11. (slang) A pair of testicles
  12. (Australia, politics) The exclusion of one member of a parliamentary party from a vote, if a member of the other party is absent for important personal reasons.
  13. Two members of opposite parties or opinion, as in a parliamentary body, who mutually agree not to vote on a given question, or on issues of a party nature during a specified time.
    There were two pairs on the final vote.
  14. (archaic) A number of things resembling one another, or belonging together; a set.
  15. (kinematics) In a mechanism, two elements, or bodies, which are so applied to each other as to mutually constrain relative motion; named in accordance with the motion it permits, as in turning pair, sliding pair, twisting pair.

Usage notes

The usual plural of pair is pairs. This is a recent innovation; the plural pair was formerly predominant and may be found in older texts like “A Key to Joyce’s Arithmetic” (compare Middle English paire, plural paire). That is, a native English speaker, back in the early 19th century, would say 20 pair of shoes, as opposed to today’s 20 pairs of shoes. In colloquial or dialectal speech, forms such as 20 pair may still be found; because of their relegation to informal speech, they are now sometimes proscribed.

Synonyms
  • (two objects in a group): duo, dyad, couple, brace, twosome, duplet; see also Thesaurus:duo
  • (pair of breasts): See also Thesaurus:breasts
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Tokelauan: pea
Translations

Verb

pair (third-person singular simple present pairs, present participle pairing, simple past and past participle paired)

  1. (transitive) To group into one or more sets of two.
    • If your computer has a built-in, non-Microsoft transceiver, you can pair the device directly to the computer by using your computer’s Bluetooth software configuration program but without using the Microsoft Bluetooth transceiver.
  2. (transitive) To bring two (animals, notably dogs) together for mating.
  3. (politics, slang) To engage (oneself) with another of opposite opinions not to vote on a particular question or class of questions.
  4. (intransitive) To suit; to fit, as a counterpart.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • parity

See also

  • couple
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English pairen, peiren, shortened form of apeiren, empeiren, from Old French empeirier, empoirier, from Late Latin peiōrō.

Verb

pair (third-person singular simple present pairs, present participle pairing, simple past and past participle paired)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To impair, to make worse.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To become worse, to deteriorate.

Anagrams

  • PIRA, RIPA, Ripa, pari-, raip

Catalan

Etymology

Unknown. Compare dialectal Italian padire.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /pəˈi/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /paˈiɾ/
  • Rhymes: -i(ɾ)

Verb

pair (first-person singular present paeixo, past participle paït)

  1. to digest
    Synonym: digerir
  2. to handle, to cope with

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • païble
  • païda
  • païdor
  • païment

Further reading

  • “pair” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “pair” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “pair” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “pair” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

French

Etymology

From Latin pār (equal).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɛʁ/

Adjective

pair (feminine singular paire, masculine plural pairs, feminine plural paires)

  1. (of a number) even
    Antonym: impair

Derived terms

  • aller de pair
  • fonction paire
  • nombre pair

Related terms

  • parité

Noun

pair m (plural pairs)

  1. A peer, high nobleman/vassal (as in peer of the realm)
Derived terms

Antonyms

  • pari m

Further reading

  • “pair” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • pari, pria, ripa

Louisiana Creole French

Etymology

From French peur (fear), compare Haitian Creole .

Verb

pair

  1. to be afraid

References

  • Alcée Fortier, Louisiana Folktales

Middle English

Noun

pair

  1. Alternative form of paire

Romanian

Etymology

From French pair.

Noun

pair m (plural pairi)

  1. peer (noble)

Declension


Romansch

Alternative forms

  • pér (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan)
  • peir (Surmiran)

Etymology

From Latin pirum.

Noun

pair m (plural pairs)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) pear

Related terms

  • paira
  • pairer

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pai̯r/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Celtic *kʷaryos. Cognate with Irish coire.

Noun

pair m (plural peiri or peirau)

  1. cauldron, boiler
  2. furnace
Derived terms
  • peiran
  • peiriaid

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

pair

  1. (literary) third-person singular present indicative/future of peri

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “pair”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial