brag vs swash what difference

what is difference between brag and swash

English

Etymology

From Middle English braggen (to make a loud noise; to speak boastfully) of unknown origin. Possibly related to the Middle English adjective brag (prideful; spirited), which is probably of Celtic origin; or from Old Norse bragr (best; foremost; poetry); or through Old English from Old Norse braka (to creak).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɹæɡ/
  • Hyphenation: brag
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Noun

brag (plural brags)

  1. A boast or boasting; bragging; ostentatious pretence or self-glorification.
  2. The thing which is boasted of.
  3. (by ellipsis) The card game three card brag.
    • January 23 1752, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, in Letters to His Son, published in 1774
      our mixed companies here, which, if they happen to rise above bragg and whist, infallibly stop short of every thing either pleasing or instructive

Derived terms

  • bragless

Translations

Verb

brag (third-person singular simple present brags, present participle bragging, simple past and past participle bragged)

  1. (intransitive) To boast; to talk with excessive pride about what one has, is able to do, or has done; often as an attempt to popularize oneself.
  2. (transitive) To boast of something.

Synonyms

  • boast

Hyponyms

  • brag on

Derived terms

  • braggard
  • humblebrag

Related terms

  • bragging rights

Translations

Adjective

brag (comparative bragger, superlative braggest)

  1. Excellent; first-rate.
  2. (archaic) Brisk; full of spirits; boasting; pretentious; conceited.
    • 1633, Ben Jonson, A Tale of a Tub
    a woundy, brag young fellow

Adverb

brag (comparative more brag, superlative most brag)

  1. (obsolete) proudly; boastfully
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)

References

Anagrams

  • ARGB, garb, grab

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse brak.

Noun

brag n (singular definite braget, plural indefinite brag)

  1. bang, crash

Inflection

Related terms

  • brage verb

Verb

brag

  1. imperative of brage

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian bregge, which derives from Proto-Germanic *brugjǭ. Cognates include West Frisian brêge.

Noun

brag f (plural bragen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) bridge


English

Etymology

Scandinavian. Compare Swedish dialect svasska, Norwegian svakka, English dialect swack (a blow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /swɒʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒʃ

Noun

swash (countable and uncountable, plural swashes)

  1. The water that washes up on shore after an incoming wave has broken
  2. (typography) A long, protruding ornamental line or pen stroke found in some typefaces and styles of calligraphy.
  3. A narrow sound or channel of water lying within a sand bank, or between a sand bank and the shore, or a bar over which the sea washes.
  4. (obsolete) Liquid filth; wash; hog mash.
  5. (obsolete) A blustering noise.
  6. (obsolete) swaggering behaviour.
  7. (obsolete) A swaggering fellow; a swasher.
  8. (architecture) An oval figure, whose mouldings are oblique to the axis of the work.
    • 1683, Joseph Moxon, Mechanick Exercises
      have the Upper Sholder of that Swash Sculped down straight, viz. to a Right Angle

References

  • swash in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Translations

Verb

swash (third-person singular simple present swashes, present participle swashing, simple past and past participle swashed)

  1. (intransitive) To swagger; to bluster and brag.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To dash or flow noisily; to splash.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 40
      How the sea rolls swashing ‘gainst the side! Stand by for reefing, hearties!
  3. (intransitive) To fall violently or noisily.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holinshed to this entry?)

Translations

See also

  • swashbuckler
  • swash letter

Adjective

swash (comparative more swash, superlative most swash)

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) Soft, like overripe fruit; swashy; squashy.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Pegge to this entry?)

Anagrams

  • Shaws, shaws, shwas

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