brag vs tout what difference

what is difference between brag and tout

English

Etymology

From Middle English braggen (to make a loud noise; to speak boastfully) of unknown origin. Possibly related to the Middle English adjective brag (prideful; spirited), which is probably of Celtic origin; or from Old Norse bragr (best; foremost; poetry); or through Old English from Old Norse braka (to creak).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɹæɡ/
  • Hyphenation: brag
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Noun

brag (plural brags)

  1. A boast or boasting; bragging; ostentatious pretence or self-glorification.
  2. The thing which is boasted of.
  3. (by ellipsis) The card game three card brag.
    • January 23 1752, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, in Letters to His Son, published in 1774
      our mixed companies here, which, if they happen to rise above bragg and whist, infallibly stop short of every thing either pleasing or instructive

Derived terms

  • bragless

Translations

Verb

brag (third-person singular simple present brags, present participle bragging, simple past and past participle bragged)

  1. (intransitive) To boast; to talk with excessive pride about what one has, is able to do, or has done; often as an attempt to popularize oneself.
  2. (transitive) To boast of something.

Synonyms

  • boast

Hyponyms

  • brag on

Derived terms

  • braggard
  • humblebrag

Related terms

  • bragging rights

Translations

Adjective

brag (comparative bragger, superlative braggest)

  1. Excellent; first-rate.
  2. (archaic) Brisk; full of spirits; boasting; pretentious; conceited.
    • 1633, Ben Jonson, A Tale of a Tub
    a woundy, brag young fellow

Adverb

brag (comparative more brag, superlative most brag)

  1. (obsolete) proudly; boastfully
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)

References

Anagrams

  • ARGB, garb, grab

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse brak.

Noun

brag n (singular definite braget, plural indefinite brag)

  1. bang, crash

Inflection

Related terms

  • brage verb

Verb

brag

  1. imperative of brage

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian bregge, which derives from Proto-Germanic *brugjǭ. Cognates include West Frisian brêge.

Noun

brag f (plural bragen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) bridge


English

Etymology 1

From a dialectal form of toot (to stick out; project; peer out; peep), itself from Middle English toten, totien, from Old English tōtian (to peep out; look; pry; spectate). Merged with Middle English touten (to jut out, protrude, gaze upon, observe, peer), from Old English *tūtian, related to Old English tȳtan (to stand out, be conspicuous, shine). Compare Icelandic túta (a teat-like prominence), tútna (to be blown up).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taʊt/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /tʌʊt/
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

Noun

tout (plural touts)

  1. Someone advertising for customers in an aggressive way.
    • 1886, Henry James, The Princess Casamassima.
      Paul Muniment looked at his young friend a moment. ‘Do you want to know what he is? He’s a tout.’
      ‘A tout? What do you mean?’
      ‘Well, a cat’s-paw, if you like better.’
      Hyacinth stared. ‘For whom, pray?’
      ‘Or a fisherman, if you like better still. I give you your choice of comparisons. I made them up as we came along in the hansom. He throws his nets and hauls in the little fishes—the pretty little shining, wriggling fishes. They are all for her; she swallows, ’em down.’
  2. A person, at a racecourse, who offers supposedly inside information on which horse is likely to win.
  3. (colloquial, archaic) A spy for a smuggler, thief, or similar.
  4. (colloquial) An informer in the Irish Republican Army.
Synonyms
  • (one advertising aggressively for customers): barker, pitchman, spruiker
Derived terms
  • ticket tout
Translations

Verb

tout (third-person singular simple present touts, present participle touting, simple past and past participle touted)

  1. (transitive) To flaunt, to publicize/publicise; to boast or brag; to promote.
    • 2016 January 25, “Why Arabs would regret a toothless Chinese dragon,” The National (retrieved 25 January 2016):
      China has touted its policy of non-interference for decades.
    • 2012, Scott Tobias, The Hunger Games, The A.V. Club
      For the 75 years since a district rebellion was put down, The Games have existed as an assertion of the Capital’s power, a winner-take-all contest that touts heroism and sacrifice—participants are called “tributes”— while pitting the districts against each other.
  2. (obsolete) To look upon or watch.
    • 1600, Edward Fairfax, The Jerusalem Delivered of Tasso, X, lvi:
      Nor durst Orcanes view the Soldan’s face, / But still upon the floor did pore and tout.
  3. (Britain, slang, horse-racing, transitive) To spy out information about (a horse, a racing stable, etc.).
  4. (US, slang, horse-racing, transitive) To give a tip on (a racehorse) to a person, with the expectation of sharing in any winnings.
  5. (Britain, slang, horse-racing, intransitive) To spy out the movements of racehorses at their trials, or to get by stealth or other improper means the secrets of the stable, for betting purposes.
  6. (US, slang, horse-racing, intransitive) To act as a tout; to give a tip on a racehorse.
  7. (intransitive) To look for, try to obtain; used with for.
    • March 1, 2016, Ben Judah on BBC Business Daily:
      To understand the new London, I lived it. I slept rough with Roma beggars and touted for work with Baltic laborers on the kerb.
Synonyms
  • pimp
  • pitch
  • promote
  • spruik
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably from French tout (all).

Noun

tout

  1. (card games) In the game of solo, a proposal to win all eight tricks.
See also
  • tout court

French

Etymology

From Middle French tout, from Old French tot, from Latin tōtus (via regional Vulgar Latin tottus with emphatic-expressive gemination); compare Catalan tot, Italian tutto, Portuguese todo, Romanian tot, Spanish todo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tu/

Noun

tout m (plural touts)

  1. whole, entirety, total

Adjective

tout (feminine singular toute, masculine plural tous, feminine plural toutes)

  1. all

Pronoun

tout ? (plural tous)

  1. everything
Derived terms

Adverb

tout

  1. all

Further reading

  • “tout” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French tout (all).

Adjective

tout

  1. all

Adverb

tout

  1. all
  2. every

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French tot.

Adjective

tout m (feminine singular toute, masculine plural tous, feminine plural toutes)

  1. all; all of

Adverb

tout (feminine singular toute, masculine plural tous, feminine plural toutes)

  1. all (intensifier)
  2. completely; totally; entirely

Usage notes

  • Like Modern French tout, when used as an intensifier it may inflect according to the gender and the number of what it is describing:
  • The uninflected form tout is always used for describing terms that don’t inflect with gender, such as verbs, adverbs and prepositions:
    (tout qualifies the preposition autour)

Descendants

  • French: tout

Norman

Etymology

From Old French tot, from Latin tōtus.

Pronunciation

Adjective

tout m

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) all

Derived terms

Adverb

tout

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) all

Scots

Verb

tout

  1. (intransitive) To pout.

Noun

tout (plural touts)

  1. A fit of sulking; a pet.
  2. A sudden illness.

Derived terms

  • toutie

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