braid vs braiding what difference

what is difference between braid and braiding

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English braiden, breiden, bræiden, from Old English breġdan (to move quickly, pull, shake, swing, throw (wrestling), draw (sword), drag; bend, weave, braid, knit, join together; change color, vary, be transformed; bind, knot; move, be pulled; flash), from Proto-West Germanic *bregdan, from Proto-Germanic *bregdaną (to flicker, flutter, jerk, tug, twitch, flinch, move, swing), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrēḱ-, *bʰrēǵ- (to shine, shimmer).

Cognate with Scots Scots brade, Scots braid (to move quickly or suddenly), Saterland Frisian braidje (to knit), West Frisian breidzje, Dutch breien (to knit), Low German breiden, German breiden, Bavarian bretten (to move quickly, twitch), Icelandic bregða (to move quickly, jerk), Faroese bregða (to move quickly, react swiftly; to draw (sword)) and Faroese bregda (to plaid, braid, twist, twine).

Alternative forms

  • brayde, breyde, broid (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɹeɪd/
  • Homophone: brayed
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Verb

braid (third-person singular simple present braids, present participle braiding, simple past and past participle braided)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To make a sudden movement with, to jerk.
  2. (archaic, intransitive) To start into motion.
  3. (transitive) To weave together, intertwine (strands of fibers, ribbons, etc.); to arrange (hair) in braids.
  4. To mix, or make uniformly soft, by beating, rubbing, or straining, as in preparing food.
  5. (obsolete) To reproach; to upbraid.
Derived terms
  • umbraid
  • upbraid
Translations

Noun

braid (plural braids)

  1. (obsolete) A sudden movement; a jerk, a wrench. [11th-17thc.]
  2. A weave of three or more strands of fibers, ribbons, cords or hair often for decoration. [from 16thc.]
  3. A stranded wire composed of a number of smaller wires twisted together
  4. A tubular sheath made of braided strands of metal placed around a central cable for shielding against electromagnetic interference.
  5. A fancy; freak; caprice.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of R. Hyrde to this entry?)
Translations

Further reading

  • braid in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • braid in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Braids on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Etymology 2

Adjective

braid (comparative more braid, superlative most braid)

  1. (obsolete) Deceitful.

Anagrams

  • Baird, Bardi, bidar, rabid

Gothic

Romanization

braid

  1. Romanization of ????????????????????

Irish

Noun

braid f

  1. (archaic, dialectal) dative singular of brad

Mutation


Middle English

Noun

braid

  1. Alternative form of breid


English

Etymology

From Middle English breydynge; equivalent to braid +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɹeɪdɪŋ/

Verb

braiding

  1. present participle of braid

Noun

braiding (plural braidings)

  1. A braided trimming used as decoration on clothes or curtains.

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