braid vs lace what difference

what is difference between braid and lace

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English braiden, breiden, bræiden, from Old English breġdan (to move quickly, pull, shake, swing, throw (wrestling), draw (sword), drag; bend, weave, braid, knit, join together; change color, vary, be transformed; bind, knot; move, be pulled; flash), from Proto-West Germanic *bregdan, from Proto-Germanic *bregdaną (to flicker, flutter, jerk, tug, twitch, flinch, move, swing), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrēḱ-, *bʰrēǵ- (to shine, shimmer).

Cognate with Scots Scots brade, Scots braid (to move quickly or suddenly), Saterland Frisian braidje (to knit), West Frisian breidzje, Dutch breien (to knit), Low German breiden, German breiden, Bavarian bretten (to move quickly, twitch), Icelandic bregða (to move quickly, jerk), Faroese bregða (to move quickly, react swiftly; to draw (sword)) and Faroese bregda (to plaid, braid, twist, twine).

Alternative forms

  • brayde, breyde, broid (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɹeɪd/
  • Homophone: brayed
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Verb

braid (third-person singular simple present braids, present participle braiding, simple past and past participle braided)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To make a sudden movement with, to jerk.
  2. (archaic, intransitive) To start into motion.
  3. (transitive) To weave together, intertwine (strands of fibers, ribbons, etc.); to arrange (hair) in braids.
  4. To mix, or make uniformly soft, by beating, rubbing, or straining, as in preparing food.
  5. (obsolete) To reproach; to upbraid.
Derived terms
  • umbraid
  • upbraid
Translations

Noun

braid (plural braids)

  1. (obsolete) A sudden movement; a jerk, a wrench. [11th-17thc.]
  2. A weave of three or more strands of fibers, ribbons, cords or hair often for decoration. [from 16thc.]
  3. A stranded wire composed of a number of smaller wires twisted together
  4. A tubular sheath made of braided strands of metal placed around a central cable for shielding against electromagnetic interference.
  5. A fancy; freak; caprice.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of R. Hyrde to this entry?)
Translations

Further reading

  • braid in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • braid in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Braids on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Etymology 2

Adjective

braid (comparative more braid, superlative most braid)

  1. (obsolete) Deceitful.

Anagrams

  • Baird, Bardi, bidar, rabid

Gothic

Romanization

braid

  1. Romanization of ????????????????????

Irish

Noun

braid f

  1. (archaic, dialectal) dative singular of brad

Mutation


Middle English

Noun

braid

  1. Alternative form of breid


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /leɪs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Etymology 1

From Middle English lace, laace, las, from Old French las, from Vulgar Latin *laceum, based on Latin laqueus. Doublet of lasso.

Noun

lace (countable and uncountable, plural laces)

  1. (uncountable) A light fabric containing patterns of holes, usually built up from a single thread. Wp
    • c. 1620, Francis Bacon, letter of advice to Sir George Villiers
      Our English dames are much given to the wearing of very fine and costly laces.
    • Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. […]  Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  2. (countable) A cord or ribbon passed through eyelets in a shoe or garment, pulled tight and tied to fasten the shoe or garment firmly. Wp
  3. A snare or gin, especially one made of interwoven cords; a net.
    • Vulcanus had caught thee [Venus] in his las.
  4. (slang, obsolete) Spirits added to coffee or another beverage.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (cord):
    • (for a shoe): shoelace
    • (for a garment): tie
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English lacen, lasen, from Old French lacer, lacier, lasser, lachier, from the noun (see above).

Verb

lace (third-person singular simple present laces, present participle lacing, simple past and past participle laced)

  1. (ergative) To fasten (something) with laces.
    • When Jenny’s stays are newly laced.
  2. (transitive) To add alcohol, poison, a drug or anything else potentially harmful to (food or drink).
  3. (transitive) To interweave items.
    • The Gond [] picked up a trail of the Karela, the vine that bears the bitter wild gourd, and laced it to and fro across the temple door.
  4. (transitive) To interweave the spokes of a bicycle wheel.
  5. (transitive) To beat; to lash; to make stripes on.
  6. (transitive) To adorn with narrow strips or braids of some decorative material.
Translations
Derived terms

Anagrams

  • ALEC, Acle, Alec, Cela, acle, alec, cale

Esperanto

Adverb

lace

  1. wearily

Related terms

  • laca

French

Verb

lace

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lacer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of lacer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of lacer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of lacer
  5. second-person singular imperative of lacer

Anagrams

  • cale, calé
  • cela

Latin

Verb

lace

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of laciō

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈla.t͡sɛ/

Noun

lace f

  1. dative/locative singular of laka

Portuguese

Verb

lace

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of laçar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of laçar
  3. first-person singular imperative of laçar
  4. third-person singular imperative of laçar

Spanish

Verb

lace

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of lazar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of lazar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of lazar.

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