branch vs ramify what difference

what is difference between branch and ramify

English

Alternative forms

  • braunch (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English branche, braunche, bronche, from Old French branche, branke, from Late Latin branca (footprint”, later also “paw, claw) (whence Middle High German pranke, German Pranke (paw)), of unknown origin.

Perhaps of Celtic origin, from a hypothetical Gaulish *vranca, from Proto-Indo-European *wrónk-eh₂. If so, then Indo-European cognates include Old Norse vró (angle, corner), Lithuanian rankà (hand), Old Church Slavonic рѫка (rǫka, hand), Albanian rangë (yardwork).

The verb is from Middle English braunchen, from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: bränch, IPA(key): /bɹɑːntʃ/
  • (US, Northern England) enPR: brănch, IPA(key): /bɹæntʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːntʃ, -æntʃ

Noun

branch (plural branches)

  1. The woody part of a tree arising from the trunk and usually dividing.
  2. Any of the parts of something that divides like the branch of a tree.
  3. (chiefly Southern US) A creek or stream which flows into a larger river. (compare Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia run, and New York and New England brook.)
  4. (geometry) One of the portions of a curve that extends outwards to an indefinitely great distance.
  5. A location of an organization with several locations.
  6. A line of family descent, in distinction from some other line or lines from the same stock; any descendant in such a line.
    • 1602, Richard Carew, Survey of Cornwall
      his father, a younger branch of the ancient stock
  7. (Mormonism) A local congregation of the LDS Church that is not large enough to form a ward; see Wikipedia article on ward in LDS church.
  8. An area in business or of knowledge, research.
  9. (nautical) A certificate given by Trinity House to a pilot qualified to take navigational control of a ship in British waters.
  10. (computing) A sequence of code that is conditionally executed.
  11. (computing) A group of related files in a source control system, including for example source code, build scripts, and media such as images.
  12. (rail transport) A branch line.

Synonyms

  • (part of a tree): bough, limb, tiller, tillow, twig; see also Thesaurus:tree

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

branch (third-person singular simple present branches, present participle branching, simple past and past participle branched)

  1. (intransitive) To arise from the trunk or a larger branch of a tree.
  2. (intransitive) To produce branches.
    • 1944, Emily Carr, The House of All Sorts, “Life Loves Living,” [2]:
      The tree throve and branched so heavily that the windows of Lower West and the Doll’s Flat were darkened.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To (cause to) divide into separate parts or subdivisions.
  4. (intransitive, computing) To jump to a different location in a program, especially as the result of a conditional statement.
  5. (transitive, colloquial) To discipline (a union member) at a branch meeting.
    • 2003, Paul Routledge, The Bumper Book of British Lefties (page 199)
      His staff were ‘not journalists, but Communists’, he maintained. Nonetheless, in 1948 his vigorous editorship took the paper’s circulation to 120,000 a day. The following year, he was ‘branched’ by the National Union of Journalists for an intemperate attack on Fleet Street.

Related terms

  • branch off
  • branch out

Translations

References

Further reading

  • branch on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • branch (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French branche (branch).

Noun

branch

  1. branch

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

branch

  1. Alternative form of braunche

Etymology 2

Verb

branch

  1. Alternative form of braunchen


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French ramifier, from Medieval Latin ramificare (to branch, ramify), from Latin rāmus (a branch) + faciō (do, make).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈɹæm.ɪ.faɪ/, /ˈɹæm.ə.faɪ/

Verb

ramify (third-person singular simple present ramifies, present participle ramifying, simple past and past participle ramified)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To divide into branches or subdivisions.
    • 1893, Henry Morris, Human Anatomy, page 648
      The cortical, hemispheral or superficial veins ramify on the surface of the brain and return the blood from the cortical substance into the venous sinuses.
  2. (figuratively) To spread or diversify into multiple fields or categories.
    • 2003, Wim van Binsbergen, Intercultural Encounters: African and anthropological lessons towards a philosophy of interculturality, page 285
      My point here is that the field within which such determination takes place is not bounded to constitute a single discipline, a single academic elite, a single language domain, a single culture, a single historical period, but that that field ramifies out so as to encompass, ultimately, the entire history of the whole of humankind.

Synonyms

  • (divide into branches): branch

Related terms

  • ramification
  • ramiform

Translations

Further reading

  • ramify in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • ramify in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

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