branchia vs gill what difference

what is difference between branchia and gill

English

Etymology

From Latin branchia, from Ancient Greek βράγχια (bránkhia, gills).

Noun

branchia (plural branchiae)

  1. A gill or other organ having the same function

Derived terms

  • branchial
  • parabranchia

Translations

Anagrams

  • bra chain

Italian

Etymology

From Latin branchia, from Ancient Greek βράγχια (bránkhia, gills).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbran.kja/

Noun

branchia f (plural branchie)

  1. gill

Related terms

  • branchiale

Latin

Noun

branchia f (genitive branchiae); first declension

  1. (usually in the plural) branchia (gill of a fish)

Declension

First-declension noun.

Descendants

  • Catalan: brànquia
  • English: branchia
  • Spanish: branchia
  • French: branchie
  • Italian: branchia
  • Sicilian: vranchia

References

  • branchia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • branchia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • branchia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English gile (gill) (early 14th century), of Scandinavian origin, akin to Swedish gäl, Danish gælle, Norwegian gjelle, and further to Old Norse gjǫlnar (lips), which also may have had the meaning of “gills” (based on Old Danish fiskegæln (gills)). The Old Norse word has been suggested as deriving from Proto-Germanic *gelunaz (jaw), which would make it root-cognate to Ancient Greek χελυνη (khelunē, lip, jaw), χεῖλος (kheîlos, lip).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Noun

gill (plural gills)

  1. (animal anatomy) a breathing organ of fish and other aquatic animals
    • Fishes [] perform their respiration under water by the gills.
  2. (of a fish) a gill slit or gill cover
  3. (mycology) one of the radial folds on the underside of the cap of a mushroom, on the surface of which the spore-producing organs are borne
    Synonym: lamella
  4. (animal anatomy) the fleshy flap that hangs below the beak of a fowl; a wattle
  5. (figuratively) the flesh under or about the chin; a wattle
    • 1728, Jonathan Swift, Ballad on Ballyspellin
      dropsy fills you to the gills
  6. (spinning) one of the combs of closely ranged steel pins which divide the ribbons of flax fiber or wool into fewer parallel filaments
Synonyms
  • branchia
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • lung

Verb

gill (third-person singular simple present gills, present participle gilling, simple past and past participle gilled)

  1. To remove the gills from a fish as part of gutting and cleaning it.
  2. (transitive) To catch (a fish) in a gillnet.
    • 1898, Report of the Commissioner of Fisheries to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, page 255:
      Owing to the peculiar shape of the pompano and the relatively large mesh in the pompano gill nets, the fish are not caught by being actually gilled.
    • 1971, Michael Culley, G. A. Kerkut, The Pilchard: Biology and Exploitation →ISBN, page 70:
      In cases of very heavy catches the nets may be hauled and stored with the fish still gilled. The fish would then be shaken out on return to the port.
    • 1994, G.D. Pickett, M.G. Pawson, Sea Bass: Biology →ISBN, page 177:
      The intention is to gill the fish, so they are usually scared into the net by rowing one boat into the middle of the net circle and banging the oars on the boat bottom or splashing the water.
  3. (intransitive) To be or become entangled in a gillnet.

Etymology 2

From Middle English gille, from Old French gille (a wine measure), from Medieval Latin gillo (earthenware jar), possibly from Gaulish gallā (vessel).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl
  • Homophone: Jill

Noun

gill (plural gills)

  1. a drink measure for spirits and wine (size varies regionally but it is about one quarter of a pint)
  2. (archaic, Britain) a measuring jug holding a quarter or half a pint
Derived terms
  • gillhouse
  • gillie

Etymology 3

From Middle English gille, from Old Norse gil

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Noun

gill (plural gills)

  1. (Britain) rivulet
  2. (Britain) ravine
Derived terms
  • Lowgill, Low Gill

Etymology 4

Etymology uncertain.

Noun

gill (plural gills)

  1. a two-wheeled frame for transporting timber

Etymology 5

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

gill (plural gills)

  1. (Scotland) a leech
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)

Etymology 6

Clipping of gillian, from the female name Gillian.

Alternative forms

  • jill

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɪl/

Noun

gill (plural gills)

  1. a female ferret
  2. (obsolete) a promiscuous woman; harlot, wanton
  3. (obsolete) a prostitute
Synonyms
  • (promiscuous woman): see Thesaurus:promiscuous woman
  • (prostitute): see Thesaurus:prostitute

Verb

gill (third-person singular simple present gills, present participle gilling, simple past and past participle gilled)

  1. (obsolete) To act as a prostitute.
Synonyms
  • see Thesaurus:prostitute oneself

Irish

Noun

gill m

  1. vocative/genitive singular of geall (pledge, security; wager, bet; gage, challenge; palm, prize; supremacy; token, promise; assets)

Mutation

References

  • “gill” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Scots

Etymology 1

Compare English gill.

Noun

gill (plural gills)

  1. a measure of liquid equivalent to one-fourth of a mutchkin or three quarters of an Imperial gill, about 110 millilitres; (by extension) a serving of drink
  2. a vessel with a capacity of one gill
Derived terms
  • Hawick gill

Verb

gill (third-person singular present gills, present participle gilling, past gill’d, past participle gill’d)

  1. to drink, tipple

Etymology 2

From Old Norse gil, Norwegian gjel (gorge, ravine), attested a. 1500.

Noun

gill (plural gills)

  1. a narrow valley with steep sides, a gully

References

  • “gill” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.

Scottish Gaelic

Noun

gill m

  1. inflection of geall (bet, wager):
    1. vocative/genitive singular
    2. nominative/dative plural

Mutation

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