brand vs marque what difference

what is difference between brand and marque

English

Etymology

From Middle English brand, from Old English brand (fire; flame; burning; torch; sword), from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (flame; flaming; fire-brand; torch; sword), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu- (to bubble forth; brew; spew forth; burn). Cognate with Scots brand, West Frisian brân (fire), Dutch brand, German Brand, Swedish brand (blaze, fire), Icelandic brandur, French brand (< Germanic). Parallel to e.g. Proto-Slavic *gorěti (to burn) from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu- (to bubble forth; brew; spew forth; burn).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɹænd/
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Noun

brand (plural brands)

  1. (obsolete, rare) A conflagration; a flame.
    • 1559, Jasper Heywood (translator), Troas
      Goe to prepare the maryages what neede the torchis light? be holde the towres of troy do shyne with brandes that blase full bright.
    • 1559, Jasper Heywood (translator), Troas
      Is yet againe thy brest enflamde,
      with brande of venus might
  2. (archaic or poetic) A piece of burning wood or peat, or a glowing cinder.
    • 1513, Gavin Douglas, The Eneados
      The fearful brands and bleezes of het fire.
    • 1859-1890, John Gorham Palfrey, History of New England to the Revolutionary War
      Snatching a live brand from a wigwam, Mason threw it on a matted roof.
    • 1559, Jasper Heywood (translator), Troas
      Or when amid the Grecians shippes,
      he threw the brandes of fyre.
  3. (Scotland, Northern England) A torch used for signaling.
  4. (archaic) A sword.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Sir Galahad
      The shattering trumpet shrilleth high,
      The hard brands shiver on the steel,
      The splinter’d spear-shafts crack and fly,
      The horse and rider reel
  5. A mark or scar made by burning with a hot iron, especially to mark cattle or to classify the contents of a cask.
  6. A branding iron.
  7. The symbolic identity, represented by a name and/or a logo, which indicates a certain product or service to the public.
  8. A specific product, service, or provider so distinguished.
  9. (by extension) Any specific type or variety of something; a distinct style or manner.
  10. The public image or reputation and recognized, typical style of an individual or group.
    • 2011, Tom Bevan, Carl M. Cannon, Election 2012: The Battle Begins, Crown (→ISBN)
      The Obama brand had taken a hit two months earlier, when he campaigned for Creigh Deeds in Virginia and Jon Corzine in New Jersey, only to see them both lose.
    • 2012, Start Your Own Personal Concierge Service, Entrepreneur Press (→ISBN), page 104:
      Her brand is edgy, cosmopolitan, and out-of-the-box, so blogging is the perfect, ever-changing match for her.
    • 2019, Sally Thorne, 99 Percent Mine: A Novel, HarperCollins (→ISBN):
      He unplugged my umbilical cord to take a leisurely swig, smirking, watching me turn blue before giving it back. My cardiologist told me that was impossible, but I’m still convinced. That’s very on-brand for [my twin] Jamie.
  11. A mark of infamy; stigma.
  12. Any minute fungus producing a burnt appearance in plants.

Synonyms

  • (distinguishing name, symbol or logo): trademark, logo, brand name, marque, tradename, proprietary name
  • (reputation): repute, name, good name

Hyponyms

  • (mark made by burning a human): badge

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

brand (third-person singular simple present brands, present participle branding, simple past and past participle branded)

  1. (transitive) To burn the flesh with a hot iron, either as a marker (for criminals, slaves etc.) or to cauterise a wound.
    When they caught him, he was branded and then locked up.
  2. (transitive) To mark (especially cattle) with a brand as proof of ownership.
    The ranch hands had to brand every new calf by lunchtime.
  3. (transitive) To make an indelible impression on the memory or senses.
    Her face is branded upon my memory.
  4. (transitive) To stigmatize, label (someone).
    He was branded a fool by everyone that heard his story.
    • I had never defrauded a man of a farthing, nor called him knave behind his back. But now the last rag that covered my nakedness had been torn from me. I was branded a blackleg, card-sharper, and murderer.
  5. (transitive, marketing) To associate a product or service with a trademark or other name and related images.
    They branded the new detergent “Suds-O”, with a nature scene inside a green O on the muted-colored recycled-cardboard box.

Translations

Derived terms

Related terms

  • brand new
  • rebrand

See also

References

  • brand at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • brand in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • brand in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brant/

Etymology 1

From Dutch brand, from Middle Dutch brant, from Old Dutch *brand, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz.

Noun

brand (plural brande, diminutive brandjie)

  1. destructive, catastrophic fire (such as a house fire)

Etymology 2

From Dutch branden, from Middle Dutch branden.

Verb

brand (present brand, present participle brandende, past participle gebrand)

  1. (ergative) to burn

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Danish brand, from Old Norse brandr, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, compare with Swedish brand, English brand, German Brand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /branˀ/, [ˈb̥ʁɑnˀ]
  • Homophone: brænd

Noun

brand c (singular definite branden, plural indefinite brande)

  1. fire (large, destructive fire, as in a building)
  2. smut (plant disease)
Inflection
References
  • “brand,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English brand, cognate with the former word.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /braːnd/, [ˈb̥ɹæːnd̥]

Noun

brand n (singular definite brandet, plural indefinite brands)

  1. brand (public image)
  2. brand (a specific product)
Inflection
References
  • “brand,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /braːnd/, [ˈb̥ɹæːnd̥]

Verb

brand

  1. imperative of brande

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: brand
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch brant, from Old Dutch *brand, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz.

Noun

brand m (plural branden, diminutive brandje n)

  1. destructive, catastrophic fire (such as a house fire)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: brand
  • Negerhollands: bran
    • Virgin Islands Creole: bran
See also
  • rook
  • vuur

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

brand

  1. first-person singular present indicative of branden
  2. imperative of branden

French

Etymology

From Middle French brand, from Old French brant, from Frankish *brand (firebrand, flaming sword), from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (firebrand, torch, sword), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu- (to burn). Cognate with Old High German brant (fire, firebrand, burning iron), Old English brand (fire, flame, brand, torch, sword, weapon), Old Norse brandr (fire, firebrand, sword). More at English brand.

Noun

brand m (plural brands)

  1. (archaic) a sword

Further reading

  • “brand” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Icelandic

Noun

brand

  1. indefinite accusative singular of brandur

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English brand.

Noun

brand m (invariable)

  1. brand (product symbol)

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • braund, brend, brond, broond

Etymology

From Old English brand, brond, from Proto-West Germanic *brand, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brand/, /braːnd/
  • (from OE brond) IPA(key): /brɔnd/, /brɔːnd/

Noun

brand (plural brandes)

  1. fire, flame
  2. burning wood or coal
  3. torch (lit stick)
  4. sword, blade

Related terms

Descendants

  • English: brand
  • Scots: brand
  • Yola: broan

References

  • “brā̆nd, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse brandr. Doublet of brann.

Noun

brand m (definite singular branden, indefinite plural brandar, definite plural brandane)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
  2. form removed with the spelling reform of 1938; superseded by brann; fire

References

  • “brand” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Occitan

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brand/

Noun

brand m (plural brands)

  1. (nautical) pitch (movement around the beam axis)

Old Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse brandr.

Noun

brand

  1. fire (occurrence of fire in a certain place)

Descendants

  • Danish: brand

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *brand, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz.

Alternative forms

  • brond

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brɑnd/

Noun

brand m

  1. firebrand; torch
  2. a sword (poetic)

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: brand, brond
    • English: brand
    • Scots: brand

Old Norse

Noun

brand

  1. indefinite accusative singular of brandr

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish brander, from Old Norse brandr, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu-. A derivative of brinna.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brand/, [bran̪ːd̪]
  • Rhymes: -and

Noun

brand c

  1. accidental, uncontrollable fire, conflagration
  2. (archaic, poetic) sword

Declension

Derived terms

  • bilbrand
  • brandbomb
  • brandfara
  • brandfarlig
  • brandfilt
  • brandförsäkring
  • brandkår
  • brandlarm
  • brandrea
  • brandrisk
  • brandskada
  • brandsläckare
  • gräsbrand
  • husbrand
  • mordbrand
  • skogsbrand
  • zombiebrand

See also

References

  • brand in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “brand”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French marque. Doublet of mark.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑː(ɹ)k/
  • Homophones: mark, Mark

Noun

marque (plural marques)

  1. A license to pass the limits of a jurisdiction, or boundary of a country, for the purpose of making reprisals; a letter of marque.
  2. A brand or make of a manufactured product, especially of a motor car (in contradistinction to a model).
  3. A ship commissioned for making captures.

Translations


French

Etymology

Of Germanic origin, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *marką. Or from marquer, from Frankish.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /maʁk/

Noun

marque f (plural marques)

  1. mark (spot)
  2. brand (of a company)
  3. mark (on one’s body, e.g. a birthmark)

Derived terms

See also

  • signe

Verb

marque

  1. first-person singular present indicative of marquer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of marquer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of marquer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of marquer
  5. second-person singular imperative of marquer

Further reading

  • “marque” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Verb

marque

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of marcar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of marcar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of marcar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of marcar

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaɾke/, [ˈmaɾ.ke]

Verb

marque

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of marcar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of marcar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of marcar.

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