brandish vs flourish what difference

what is difference between brandish and flourish

English

Etymology

From Middle English braundischen, from Old French brandiss-, stem of brandir (to flourish a sword), from Frankish *brandijan, from Frankish *brand (firebrand; sword), from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (fire; flame; sword), whence Old English brand (firebrand; torch); equivalent to brand +‎ -ish. More at brand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɹændɪʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ændɪʃ

Verb

brandish (third-person singular simple present brandishes, present participle brandishing, simple past and past participle brandished)

  1. (transitive) To move or swing a weapon back and forth, particularly if demonstrating anger, threat or skill.
    • 1819, Joseph Rodman Drake, The Culprit Fay
      the quivering lance which he brandished bright
  2. (transitive) To bear something with ostentatious show.
    • 2011, Jejomar C. Binay, Binay: Blame corruption on modern consumerism, Manila Bulletin Publishing Corporation, [1]:
      It sets the stage for cutting corners in our principles just so we can brandish a perceived badge of stature.

Synonyms

  • flourish, wave

Translations

Noun

brandish (plural brandishes)

  1. The act of flourishing or waving.

Synonyms

  • flourish


English

Alternative forms

  • florysh, floryshe (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English floryschen, from Old French floriss-, stem of some conjugated forms of florir (compare French fleurir), from Vulgar Latin *florīre, from Latin flōreō (I bloom) (and conjugation partly from flōrēscō), from flōs (flower). See flower + -ish.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈflʌɹ.ɪʃ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈflʌɹ.ɪʃ/, /ˈflɝ.ɪʃ/
    • (hypercorrection) IPA(key): /ˈflʊɹ.ɪʃ/
  • (accents without the hurryfurry merger)
  • (accents with the hurryfurry merger)

Verb

flourish (third-person singular simple present flourishes, present participle flourishing, simple past and past participle flourished)

  1. (intransitive) To thrive or grow well.
  2. (intransitive) To prosper or fare well.
    • 1795, Robert Nelson, A Companion for the Festivals and Fasts of the Church of England
      Bad men as frequently prosper and flourish, and that by the means of their wickedness.
  3. (intransitive) To be in a period of greatest influence.
  4. (transitive) To develop; to make thrive; to expand.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, A Discourse of a War with Spain
      Bottoms of thread [] which with a good needle, perhaps may be flourished into large works.
  5. (transitive) To make bold, sweeping movements with.
  6. (intransitive) To make bold and sweeping, fanciful, or wanton movements, by way of ornament, parade, bravado, etc.; to play with fantastic and irregular motion.
  7. (intransitive) To use florid language; to indulge in rhetorical figures and lofty expressions.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard
      They dilate [] and flourish long upon little incidents.
  8. (intransitive) To make ornamental strokes with the pen; to write graceful, decorative figures.
  9. (transitive) To adorn with beautiful figures or rhetoric; to ornament with anything showy; to embellish.
    • 1716, Elijah Fenton, an ode to John Gower
      With shadowy verdure flourish’d high,
      A sudden youth the groves enjoy.
    • c. 1603-1604, William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure, Act IV, Scene 1
      To bring you thus together, ’tis no sin, Sith that the justice of your title to him Doth flourish the deceit.
  10. (intransitive) To execute an irregular or fanciful strain of music, by way of ornament or prelude.
  11. (intransitive, obsolete) To boast; to vaunt; to brag.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:prosper

Translations

Noun

flourish (plural flourishes)

  1. A dramatic gesture such as the waving of a flag.
  2. An ornamentation.
  3. (music) A ceremonious passage such as a fanfare.
  4. (architecture) A decorative embellishment on a building.

Translations

References

  • flourish in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • rushfoil

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