brat vs terror what difference

what is difference between brat and terror

English

Etymology 1

Early Modern English (ca. 1500) slang term meaning “beggar’s child”. Possibly from Scots bratchet (bitch, hound). Or, possibly originally a dialectal word, from northern and western England and the Midlands, for a “makeshift or ragged garment,” from Old English bratt (cloak), which is from a Celtic source (Old Irish brat (cloak, cloth)).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɹat/
  • (US) enPR: brăt, IPA(key): /bɹæt/
  • Rhymes: -æt

Noun

brat (plural brats)

  1. (derogatory, slang) A child who is regarded as mischievous, unruly, spoiled, or selfish.
  2. (slang) A son or daughter (at any age) of an active military service member.
  3. a turbot or flatfish
  4. (historical) A rough cloak or ragged garment
  5. (obsolete, Britain, Scotland, dialect) A coarse kind of apron for keeping the clothes clean; a bib.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete) The young of an animal.
    • 1680, Roger L’Estrange, Citt and Bumpkin
      They are your Will-Worship-men , your Prelates Brats: Take the whole Litter of’um , and you’ll finde never a barrel better Herring.

Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:child.
Translations

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Etymology 2

Shortened from bratwurst, from German Bratwurst.

Pronunciation

  • (US) enPR: brŏt, IPA(key): /bɹɑt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

Noun

brat (plural brats)

  1. (informal) bratwurst
Translations

See also

  • Appendix:English collective nouns

Etymology 3

Noun

brat (plural brats)

  1. (mining) A thin bed of coal mixed with pyrites or carbonate of lime.

Etymology 4

Noun

brat

  1. (military) Acronym of Born, Raised, And Transferred.

Anagrams

  • BART, Bart, T-bar

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brat/, [ˈb̥ʁɑd̥]

Etymology

A merger of two unrelated adjectives:

  • Old Norse *brantr (east), brattr (west), from Proto-Germanic *brantaz, cognate with Norwegian bratt, Swedish brant, English brant.
  • Old Norse bráðr (hasty, sudden), from Proto-Germanic *brēþaz (hot, in a hurry, rushed), cognate with Norwegian brå, Swedish bråd. In early modern Danish, the latter meaning also had the form brad, with the neuter bradt.

Adjective

brat (plural and definite singular attributive bratte, comparative brattere, superlative (predicative) brattest, superlative (attributive) bratteste)

  1. steep
  2. sudden

References

  • “brat” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • “brat” in Ordbog over det danske Sprog

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brɑt/
  • Hyphenation: brat
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Noun

brat n (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of brat.

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʁaːt/
  • Rhymes: -aːt

Verb

brat

  1. singular imperative of braten
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of braten

Irish

Pronunciation

  • (Munster) IPA(key): [bˠɾˠɑt̪ˠ]
  • (Connacht, Ulster) IPA(key): [bˠɾˠat̪ˠ]

Etymology 1

From Old Irish bratt, from Proto-Celtic *bratto- (compare Welsh brethyn (cloth), from *bratt-ino-).

Noun

brat m (genitive singular brait, nominative plural brait)

  1. mantle, cloak
    Proverb:
  2. covering
  3. (theater) curtain
  4. Alternative form of bratach (flag)
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

brat m (genitive singular brat, nominative plural bratanna)

  1. broth; thick soup
Declension

Mutation

Further reading

  • “brat” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “bratt”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “brat” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “brat” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Kashubian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Noun

brat m

  1. brother

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [brat]

Verb

brat

  1. supine of braś

Polish

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brat/

Noun

brat m pers (diminutive braciszek)

  1. brother
    • Uwspółcześniona Biblia Gdańska, Mark 1:16:
      A przechadzając się nad Morzem Galilejskim, zobaczył Szymona i Andrzeja, jego brata, zarzucających sieć w morze; byli bowiem rybakami.

      As Jesus was strolling beside the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and Andrew, his brother, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen

Declension

Derived terms

  • (adjectives) bracki, braterski, bratni, pobratymczy
  • (adverbs) bratersko, po bratersku
  • (nouns) brachol, bractwo, brać, brat łata, bratanek, bratanica, bratanka, bratowa, bratczyk, bratek, brateńko, bratul, bratunio, rozbrat, pobratymstwo, pobratymiec, pobratymca, półbrat
  • (verbs) bratać, być za pan brat, rozbratać, zbratać

Further reading

  • brat in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • brat in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish bratt, from Proto-Celtic *bratto- (compare Welsh brethyn (cloth), from *bratt-ino-).

Noun

brat m (genitive singular brata, plural bratan)

  1. cloak, cover, covering, mantle, veil, canopy
  2. mat

Derived terms

  • brat-cùil

Mutation


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brât/

Noun

brȁt m (Cyrillic spelling бра̏т)

  1. brother
  2. mate, pal, buddy, when used in informal speech to address somebody in vocative (brate)

Usage notes

There is no plural form for this noun. Instead, the collective term brȁća is used for plural meanings.

Declension

Derived terms


Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brat/

Noun

brat m (genitive singular brata, nominative plural bratia, genitive plural bratov, declension pattern of chlap)

  1. brother

Declension

Further reading

  • brat in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /brát/

Noun

brȁt m anim

  1. brother

Inflection

Further reading

  • brat”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English brat (spoiled child).

Noun

brat c

  1. (slang) person who is very careful about following fashion trends; someone who rarely ever acts independently but rather follows peer pressure, usually maintaining an appearance of visible wealth

Usage notes

  • Mainly used in plural, as a collective noun.
  • Can occasionally be seen considered as neuter rather than common.

Synonyms

  • stekare

Anagrams

  • bart


English

Alternative forms

  • terrour (obsolete or hypercorrect)

Etymology

From late Middle English terrour, from Old French terreur (terror, fear, dread), from Latin terror (fright, fear, terror), from terrēre (to frighten, terrify), from Proto-Indo-European *tre- (to shake), *tres- (to tremble).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈtɛɹ.ɚ/
    • (some accents) IPA(key): /tɛɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈtɛɹ.ə/
  • Rhymes: -ɛɹə(ɹ), -ɛə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: ter‧ror
  • Homophones: tare, tear (some American accents)
  • Homophones: terra, Terra (non-rhotic accents)

Noun

terror (countable and uncountable, plural terrors)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Intense dread, fright, or fear.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:fear
    • 1794, William Godwin, Things as they are; or, The adventures of Caleb
      The terrors with which I was seized [] were extreme.
  2. (uncountable) The action or quality of causing dread; terribleness, especially such qualities in narrative fiction.
    • 1921, Edith Birkhead, The tale of terror: a study of the Gothic romance
  3. (countable) Something or someone that causes such fear.
    • 1841, Ralph Waldo Emerson
      The terrors of the storm
  4. (uncountable) Terrorism.
  5. (pathology, countable) A night terror.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • alarm
  • fright
  • consternation
  • dread
  • dismay

References

  • terror at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • terror in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • terror in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • terror in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • rorter

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin terror, terrorem.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /təˈro/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /teˈroɾ/

Noun

terror m or f (plural terrors)

  1. terror, horror

Danish

Noun

terror c (singular definite terroren, not used in plural form)

  1. terror

References

  • “terror” in Den Danske Ordbog

Galician

Etymology

From Latin terror.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [tɛˈroɾ]

Noun

terror m (plural terrores)

  1. terror
    Synonyms: espanto, horror, pavor

Related terms

References

  • “terror” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez – Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “terror” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “terror” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowed from English terror, from Latin terror.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɛrːor]
  • Hyphenation: ter‧ror
  • Rhymes: -or

Noun

terror (plural terrorok)

  1. terror (especially the action or quality of causing dread)
    Synonym: megfélemlítés

Declension

Derived terms

  • terrortámadás

References

Further reading

  • terror in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Latin

Etymology

From terreō (frighten, terrify) +‎ -or.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈter.ror/, [ˈt̪ɛɾːɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈter.ror/, [ˈt̪ɛrːɔr]

Noun

terror m (genitive terrōris); third declension

  1. a dread, terror, great fear, alarm, panic
  2. an object of fear or dread

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Related terms

Descendants

References

  • terror in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • terror in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowed from English terror, from Latin terror.

Noun

terror m (definite singular terroren, uncountable)

  1. terror

Derived terms

  • terrorangrep
  • terrorhandling
  • terrorregime

References

  • “terror” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from English terror, from Latin terror.

Noun

terror m (definite singular terroren, uncountable)

  1. terror

Derived terms

  • terrorhandling
  • terrorregime

References

  • “terror” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

From English terror, from Old French terreur (terror, fear, dread), from Latin terror (fright, fear, terror), from terrēre (to frighten, terrify).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɛr.rɔr/

Noun

terror m inan

  1. (politics) terror (policy of political repression and violence intended to subdue political opposition)

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verbs) terroryzować, strerroryzować
  • (nouns) terrorysta, terrortystka, terroryzm
  • (adjective) terrorystyczny
  • (adverb) terrorystycznie

Further reading

  • terror in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • terror in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin terror, terrorem.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ter‧ror

Noun

terror m (plural terrores)

  1. terror (intense fear)
    • 2003, J. K. Rowling, Lya Wyler, Harry Potter e a Ordem da Fênix, Rocco, page 493:
      Os olhos do elfo se arregalavam de terror e ele tremia.
  2. (Brazil, slang) a very troublesome person or thing
    Você é um terror, garoto!You’re naughty, boy!
    Esses bandidos são um terrorThose criminals are terrible!

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:terror.

Derived terms

  • aterrorizar
  • terrorismo
  • terrorista

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin terror, terrorem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /teˈroɾ/, [t̪eˈroɾ]

Noun

terror m (plural terrores)

  1. horror (genre)
  2. terror

Derived terms

Related terms

  • terrible

Further reading

  • “terror” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Noun

terror c

  1. terror

Declension

Related terms

  • terrordåd
  • terrorhandling
  • terrorism
  • terrorist


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