bray vs crunch what difference

what is difference between bray and crunch

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: breɪ, IPA(key): /bɹeɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ
  • Homophone: brae

Etymology 1

The verb is derived from Middle English braien, brai, braie, bray, braye (of a person or animal: to vocalize loudly; of the weather: to make a loud sound, howl, roar), from Old French brai, braire (of an animal: to bray; of a person: to cry or shout out) (modern French braire (of an animal: to bray; of a person: to shout; to cry, weep)), possibly from Vulgar Latin *bragiō, from Gaulish *bragu (compare Breton breugiñ (to bray), brammañ (to flatulate), Cornish bramma, brabma (to flatulate), Old Irish braigid (to flatulate)), from Proto-Celtic *brageti, *bragyeti (to flatulate), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreHg- (to flatulate; to stink); cognate with Latin fragrō (to smell). Alternatively, the word could be from a Germanic source, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *brekaną (to break), and cognate with frangere (to break, shatter).

The noun is derived from the verb, or from Middle English brai, brait (shriek; outcry), from Old French brai, brait (a cry), from braire (of an animal: to bray; of a person: to shout; to cry, weep); see above.

Verb

bray (third-person singular simple present brays, present participle braying, simple past and past participle brayed)

  1. (intransitive) Of an animal (now chiefly of animals related to the ass or donkey, and the camel): to make its cry.
    Synonyms: (archaic, dialectal) blore, (ass or donkey) hee-haw
  2. (intransitive, by extension) To make a harsh, discordant sound like a donkey’s bray.
  3. (transitive) To make or utter (a shout, sound, etc.) discordantly, loudly, or in a harsh and grating manner.
Derived terms
  • brayer
  • braying (noun)
  • brayingly
Translations

Noun

bray (plural brays)

  1. The cry of an animal, now chiefly that of animals related to the ass or donkey, or the camel.
    Synonym: (ass or donkey) hee-haw
  2. (by extension) Any discordant, grating, or harsh sound.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English braie, braien, braye, brayen, breien (to break (something) into small pieces, to chop, crush, grind; to use a mortar), from Anglo-Norman breier, Old French breie, breier, broiier (modern French broyer (to crush, grind)), possibly from Frankish *brekan (to break), from Proto-Germanic *brekaną (to break), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreg- (to break); thus making the English word a doublet of break.

Verb

bray (third-person singular simple present brays, present participle braying, simple past and past participle brayed)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To crush or pound, especially using a pestle and mortar.
  2. (transitive, Britain, chiefly Yorkshire, by extension) To hit (someone or something).
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Raby, Ryba, bary-, yarb


English

Etymology

From earlier craunch, cranch, of imitative origin.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /kɹʌntʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌntʃ

Verb

crunch (third-person singular simple present crunches, present participle crunching, simple past and past participle crunched)

  1. To crush something, especially food, with a noisy crackling sound.
    • 1816, Lord Byron, The Siege of Corinth:
      And their white tusks crunch’d o’er the whiter skull,
  2. To be crushed with a noisy crackling sound.
  3. (slang) To calculate or otherwise process (e.g. to crunch numbers: to perform mathematical calculations). Presumably from the sound made by mechanical calculators.
  4. To grind or press with violence and noise.
  5. To emit a grinding or crunching noise.
    • 1849, Henry James, Confidence
      There were sounds in the air above his head – sounds of the crunching and rattling of the loose, smooth stones as his neighbors moved about []
  6. (computing, transitive) To compress (data) using a particular algorithm, so that it can be restored by decrunching.
    • 1993, “Michael Barsoom”, [comp.sys.amiga.announce] PackIt Announcement (on newsgroup comp.archives)
      PackIt will not crunch executables, unless told to do so.
  7. (software engineering, slang, transitive) To make employees work overtime in order to meet a deadline in the development of a project.

Derived terms

  • cruncher

Translations

Noun

crunch (plural crunches)

  1. A noisy crackling sound; the sound usually associated with crunching.
  2. A critical moment or event.
    • 1985, John C. L. Gibson, Job (page 237)
      The friends, on the contrary, argue that Job does not “know”, that only God knows; yet, when it comes to the crunch, they themselves seem to know as much as God knows: for example, that Job is a guilty sinner.
  3. A problem that leads to a crisis.
  4. (exercise) A form of abdominal exercise, based on a sit-up but in which the lower back remains in contact with the floor.
  5. (software engineering, slang) The overtime work required to catch up and finish a project, usually in the final weeks of development before release.
  6. A dessert consisting of a crunchy topping with fruit underneath.
    Synonyms: crisp, crumble
  7. (chiefly US) The symbol #.
  8. (cooking, generally in the plural) A small piece created by crushing; a piece of material with a friable or crunchy texture.
  9. (slang) A shortage.

Synonyms

(symbol):

  • hashtag
  • number sign
  • pound sign

Coordinate terms

  • (abdominal exercise): sit-up, trunk curl

Derived terms

  • credit crunch
  • crunch time
  • crunchy
  • reverse crunch
  • scrunch

Translations


Spanish

Noun

crunch m (plural crunches)

  1. crunch (exercise)

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