Breach vs Broach what difference

what is difference between Breach and Broach

English

Etymology

From Middle English breche, from Old English bryċe (fracture, breach) and brǣċ (breach, breaking, destruction), from Proto-West Germanic *bruki, from Proto-Germanic *brukiz (breach, fissure) and *brēkō (breaking).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bɹiːtʃ]
  • Rhymes: -iːtʃ
  • Homophone: breech

Noun

breach (plural breaches)

  1. A gap or opening made by breaking or battering, as in a wall, fortification or levee / embankment; the space between the parts of a solid body rent by violence
    Synonyms: break, rupture, fissure
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V, act 3, scene 1:
      “Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead.”
  2. A breaking up of amicable relations, a falling-out.
  3. A breaking of waters, as over a vessel or a coastal defence; the waters themselves
    A clear breach is when the waves roll over the vessel without breaking. A clean breach is when everything on deck is swept away.
    Synonyms: surge, surf
  4. A breaking out upon; an assault.
  5. (archaic) A bruise; a wound.
  6. (archaic) A hernia; a rupture.
  7. (law) A breaking or infraction of a law, or of any obligation or tie; violation; non-fulfillment
    breach of promise
  8. (figuratively) A difference in opinions, social class etc.
    • 2013 September 28, Kenan Malik, “London Is Special, but Not That Special,” New York Times (retrieved 28 September 2013):
      For London to have its own exclusive immigration policy would exacerbate the sense that immigration benefits only certain groups and disadvantages the rest. It would entrench the gap between London and the rest of the nation. And it would widen the breach between the public and the elite that has helped fuel anti-immigrant hostility.
  9. The act of breaking, in a figurative sense.
    • 1748, David Hume, Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, Section 3, § 12:
      But were the poet to make a total difression from his subject, and introduce a new actor, nowise connected with the personages, the imagination, feeling a breach in transition, would enter coldly into the new scene;

Synonyms

  • break
  • rift
  • rupture
  • gap

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

breach (third-person singular simple present breaches, present participle breaching, simple past and past participle breached)

  1. (transitive) To make a breach in.
    They breached the outer wall, but not the main one.
  2. (transitive) To violate or break.
    • 2000, Mobile Oil Exploration & Producing Southeast, Inc. v. United States, Justice Stevens.
      “I therefore agree with the Court that the Government did breach its contract with petitioners in failing to approve, within 30 days of its receipt, the plan of exploration petitioners submitted.”
  3. (transitive, nautical, of the sea) To break into a ship or into a coastal defence.
  4. (intransitive, of a whale) To leap out of the water.
    • 1835, Hart, Joseph C., Miriam Coffin, or The whale-fishermen, Harper & brothers, vol. 2, page 147:
      The fearless whale-fishermen now found themselves in the midst of the monsters; … some … came jumping into the light of day, head uppermost, exhibiting their entire bodies in the sun, and falling on their sides into the water with the weight of a hundred tons, and thus “breaching” with a crash that the thunder of a park of artillery could scarcely equal.
    • 1837, Hamilton, Robert, The natural history of the ordinary cetacea or whales, W.H. Lizars, page 166:
      But one of its most surprising feats, as has been mentioned of the genera already described, is leaping completely out of the water, or ‘breaching,’ as it is called. … it seldom breaches more than twice or thrice at a time, and in quick succession.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Bacher


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɹəʊtʃ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bɹoʊtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊtʃ
  • Homophone: brooch

Etymology 1

From Middle English broche, from Old French broche, from Vulgar Latin *brocca, originally a feminine form of Latin broccus, perhaps ultimately of Gaulish origin (see Scottish Gaelic bròg; cognate to brochure).

Noun

broach (plural broaches)

  1. A series of chisel points mounted on one piece of steel. For example, the toothed stone chisel shown here.
  2. (masonry) A broad chisel for stone-cutting.
  3. Alternative spelling of brooch
    • 2012, Cara C. Putman, A Promise Born
      She pinned a broach on her jacket.
      When Viv saw it, she laughed. “Is that the best you can do? A flower broach?”
  4. A spit for cooking food.
    • He turned a broach that had worn a crown.
  5. An awl; a bodkin; also, a wooden rod or pin, sharpened at each end, used by thatchers.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Forby to this entry?)
  6. (architecture, Britain, dialect) A spire rising from a tower.
  7. A spit-like start on the head of a young stag.
  8. The stick from which candle wicks are suspended for dipping.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  9. The pin in a lock which enters the barrel of the key.
Translations

Verb

broach (third-person singular simple present broaches, present participle broaching, simple past and past participle broached)

  1. (transitive) To make a hole in, especially a cask of liquor, and put in a tap in order to draw the liquid.
    • 1837 Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History
      How often has the broached barrel proved not to be for joy and heart effusion, but for duel and head-breakage.
  2. (transitive) To open, to make an opening into; to pierce.
    French knights at Agincourt were unable to broach the English line.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To begin discussion about (something).
    I broached the subject of contraceptives carefully when the teenager mentioned his promiscuity.
    • 1913, D. H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 4
      Yet he was much too much scared of broaching any man, let alone one in a peaked cap, to dare to ask.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter VI
      I have tried on several occasions to broach the subject of my love to Lys; but she will not listen.
Related terms
  • brochure
Translations

Etymology 2

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Verb

broach (third-person singular simple present broaches, present participle broaching, simple past and past participle broached)

  1. (intransitive) To be turned sideways to oncoming waves, especially large or breaking waves.
    The small boat broached and nearly sank, because of the large waves.
  2. (transitive) To cause to turn sideways to oncoming waves, especially large or breaking waves (usually followed by to; also figurative).
    • 18th C, Thomas Dibdin, Tom Bowling
      Here a sheer hulk lies poor Tom Bowling … for death hath broached him to.
    Each time we came around into the wind, the sea broached our bow.
Translations

References

See also

  • broach to

Scots

Alternative forms

  • brutch, bruch, broche, brotch

Etymology

From Middle Scots broche, from Middle English broche, from Old French broche, from Vulgar Latin *brocca, originally a feminine form of Latin broccus; possibly ultimately of Gaulish provenance.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbrɒtʃ/
  • (Southern Scots) IPA(key): /ˈbrəʊtʃ/

Noun

broach (plural broachs)

  1. (archaic) A spindle.
  2. (archaic) A slender or thin person (especially as a nickname).

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