break vs bust what difference

what is difference between break and bust

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: brāk, IPA(key): /bɹeɪk/, [bɹʷeɪ̯k]
  • Rhymes: -eɪk
  • Homophone: brake

Etymology 1

From Middle English breken, from Old English brecan (to break), from Proto-West Germanic *brekan, from Proto-Germanic *brekaną (to break), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreg- (to break). The word is a doublet of bray.

Verb

break (third-person singular simple present breaks, present participle breaking, simple past broke or (archaic) brake, past participle broken or (colloquial) broke)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To separate into two or more pieces, to fracture or crack, by a process that cannot easily be reversed for reassembly.
    1. (transitive, intransitive) To crack or fracture (bone) under a physical strain.
  2. (transitive) To divide (something, often money) into smaller units.
  3. (transitive) To cause (a person or animal) to lose spirit or will; to crush the spirits of.
    • 1613, William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, Henry VIII, Act IV, Sc. 2:
      An old man, broken with the storms of state,
      Is come to lay his weary bones among ye;
      Give him a little earth for charity
    1. To turn an animal into a beast of burden.
      • 2002, John Fusco, Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron
        Colonel: See, gentlemen? Any horse could be broken.
  4. (intransitive) To be crushed, or overwhelmed with sorrow or grief.
  5. (transitive) To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate.
    1. (transitive, theater) To end the run of (a play).
      • 1958, Walter Macqueen-Pope, St. James’s: Theatre of Distinction (page 134)
        In July Alexander broke the run and went on tour, as was his custom. He believed in keeping in touch with provincial audiences and how wise he was!
      • 1986, Kurt Gänzl, The British Musical Theatre: 1865-1914 (page 610)
        After Camberwell he broke the play’s season and brought it back in the autumn with a few revisions and a noticeably strengthened cast but without any special success.
  6. (transitive) To ruin financially.
    • With arts like these rich Matho, when he speaks, / Attracts all fees, and little lawyers breaks.
  7. (transitive) To violate, to not adhere to.
  8. (intransitive, of a fever) To pass the most dangerous part of the illness; to go down, in terms of temperature.
    Susan’s fever broke at about 3 AM, and the doctor said the worst was over.
  9. (intransitive, of a spell of settled weather) To end.
  10. (intransitive, of a storm) To begin; to end.
  11. (intransitive, of morning, dawn, day etc.) To arrive.
  12. (transitive, gaming slang) To render (a game) unchallenging by altering its rules or exploiting loopholes or weaknesses in them in a way that gives a player an unfair advantage.
  13. (transitive, intransitive) To stop, or to cause to stop, functioning properly or altogether.
    1. (specifically, in programming) To cause (some feature of a program or piece of software) to stop functioning properly; to cause a regression.
  14. (transitive) To cause (a barrier) to no longer bar.
    1. (specifically) To cause the shell of (an egg) to crack, so that the inside (yolk) is accessible.
    2. (specifically) To open (a safe) without using the correct key, combination, or the like.
  15. (transitive) To destroy the arrangement of; to throw into disorder; to pierce.
  16. (intransitive, of a wave of water) To collapse into surf, after arriving in shallow water.
  17. (intransitive) To burst forth; to make its way; to come into view.
    • 1800, William Wordsworth, The Fountain
      And from the turf a fountain broke, / And gurgled at our feet.
  18. (intransitive) To interrupt or cease one’s work or occupation temporarily.
  19. (transitive) To interrupt (a fall) by inserting something so that the falling object does not (immediately) hit something else beneath.
  20. (transitive, ergative) To disclose or make known an item of news, etc.
  21. (intransitive, of a sound) To become audible suddenly.
    • c. 1843,, George Lippard, The Battle-Day of Germantown, reprinted in Washington and His Generals “1776”, page 45 [2]:
      Like the crash of thunderbolts[…], the sound of musquetry broke over the lawn, […].
  22. (transitive) To change a steady state abruptly.
  23. (copulative, informal) To suddenly become.
  24. (intransitive) Of a male voice, to become deeper at puberty.
  25. (intransitive) Of a voice, to alter in type due to emotion or strain: in men generally to go up, in women sometimes to go down; to crack.
  26. (transitive) To surpass or do better than (a specific number), to do better than (a record), setting a new record.
  27. (sports and games):
    1. (transitive, tennis) To win a game (against one’s opponent) as receiver.
    2. (intransitive, billiards, snooker, pool) To make the first shot; to scatter the balls from the initial neat arrangement.
    3. (transitive, backgammon) To remove one of the two men on (a point).
  28. (transitive, military, most often in the passive tense) To demote, to reduce the military rank of.
    • 1926, T.E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, New York: Anchor (1991), p. 167:
      Sir Reginald Wingate, High Commissioner in Egypt, was happy for the success of the work he had advocated for years. I grudged him this happiness; for McMahon, who took the actual risk of starting it, had been broken just before prosperity began.
    • 1953 February 9, “Books: First Rulers of Asia”, in Time:
      And he played no favorites: when his son-in-law sacked a city he had been told to spare, Genghis broke him to private.
    • 1968, William Manchester, The Arms of Krupp, Back Bay (2003), →ISBN, page 215:
      One morning after the budget had failed to balance Finanzminister von Scholz picked up Der Reichsanzeiger and found he had been broken to sergeant.
    • 2006, Peter Collier, Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty, Second Edition, Artisan Books, →ISBN, page 42:
      Not long after this event, Clausen became involved in another disciplinary situation and was broken to private—the only one to win the Medal of Honor in Vietnam.
  29. (transitive) To end (a connection), to disconnect.
  30. (intransitive, of an emulsion) To demulsify.
  31. (intransitive, sports) To counter-attack.
  32. (transitive, obsolete) To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate.
  33. (intransitive) To become weakened in constitution or faculties; to lose health or strength.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, Verses on His Own Death
      See how the dean begins to break; / Poor gentleman he droops apace.
  34. (intransitive, obsolete) To fail in business; to become bankrupt.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Riches
      He that puts all upon adventures doth oftentimes break, and come to poverty.
  35. (transitive) To destroy the strength, firmness, or consistency of.
  36. (transitive) To destroy the official character and standing of; to cashier; to dismiss.
    • January 11, 1711, Jonathan Swift, The Examiner No. 24
      when I see a great officer broke.
  37. (intransitive) To make an abrupt or sudden change; to change the gait.
  38. (intransitive, archaic) To fall out; to terminate friendship.
    • c. 1700 Jeremy Collier, On Friendship
      To break upon the score of danger or expense is to be mean and narrow-spirited.
  39. (computing) To terminate the execution of a program before normal completion.
  40. (programming) To suspend the execution of a program during debugging so that the state of the program can be investigated.
  41. (computing) To cause, or allow the occurrence of, a line break.
Conjugation
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:break.
Synonyms
  • (ergative: separate into two or more pieces): burst, bust, shatter, shear, smash, split
  • (ergative: crack (bone)): crack, fracture
  • (transitive: turn an animal into a beast of burden): break in, subject, tame
  • (transitive: do that which is forbidden by): contravene, go against, violate
  • (intransitive: stop functioning): break down, bust, fail, go down (of a computer or computer network)
Antonyms
  • (transitive: cause to end up in two or more pieces): assemble, fix, join, mend, put together, repair
  • (tennis, intransitive: break serve): hold
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

break (plural breaks)

  1. An instance of breaking something into two or more pieces.
  2. A physical space that opens up in something or between two things.
  3. A rest or pause, usually from work.
  4. (Britain) a time for students to talk or play.
  5. A short holiday.
  6. A temporary split with a romantic partner.
  7. An interval or intermission between two parts of a performance, for example a theatre show, broadcast, or sports game.
  8. A significant change in circumstance, attitude, perception, or focus of attention.
  9. The beginning (of the morning).
  10. An act of escaping.
  11. (computing) The separation between lines, paragraphs or pages of a written text.
    • 2001, Nan Barber, ‎David Reynolds, Office 2001 for Macintosh: The Missing Manual (page 138)
      No matter how much text you add above the break, the text after the break will always appear at the top of a new page.
  12. (computing) A keystroke or other signal that causes a program to terminate or suspend execution.
  13. (programming) Short for breakpoint.
  14. (Britain, weather) A change, particularly the end of a spell of persistent good or bad weather.
  15. (sports and games):
    1. (tennis) A game won by the receiving player(s).
    2. (billiards, snooker, pool) The first shot in a game of billiards
    3. (snooker) The number of points scored by one player in one visit to the table
    4. (soccer) The counter-attack
    5. (surfing) A place where waves break (that is, where waves pitch or spill forward creating white water).
  16. (dated) A large four-wheeled carriage, having a straight body and calash top, with the driver’s seat in front and the footman’s behind.
  17. (equitation) A sharp bit or snaffle.
    • 1576, George Gascoigne, The Steele Glas
      Pampered jades [] which need nor break nor bit.
  18. (music) A short section of music, often between verses, in which some performers stop while others continue.
  19. (music) The point in the musical scale at which a woodwind instrument is designed to overblow, that is, to move from its lower to its upper register.
  20. (geography, chiefly in the plural) An area along a river that features steep banks, bluffs, or gorges (e.g., Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, US).
  21. (obsolete, slang) error [late 19th–early 20th c.]
Usage notes
  • music The instruments that are named are the ones that carry on playing, for example a fiddle break implies that the fiddle is the most prominent instrument playing during the break.
Synonyms
  • (instance of breaking something into two pieces): split
  • (physical space that opens up in something or between two things): breach, gap, space; see also Thesaurus:interspace or Thesaurus:hole
  • (rest or pause, usually from work): time-out; see also Thesaurus:pause
  • (time for playing outside): playtime (UK), recess (US)
  • (short holiday): day off, time off; see also Thesaurus:vacation
  • (beginning of the morning): crack of dawn; see also Thesaurus:dawn
  • (error): See Thesaurus:error
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Clipping of breakdown (the percussion break of songs chosen by a DJ for use in hip-hop music) and see also breakdancing.

Noun

break (plural breaks)

  1. (music) A section of extended repetition of the percussion break to a song, created by a hip-hop DJ as rhythmic dance music.
Derived terms
  • Amen break

References

  • break at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • 2001. The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music: North America. Garland Publishing. Ellen Koskoff (Ed.). Pgs. 694-695.

Anagrams

  • Abrek, Baker, Brake, baker, barke, brake

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʁɛk/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English break.

Noun

break m (plural breaks)

  1. break (pause, holiday)
    Synonym: pause
  2. (tennis) break (of serve)

Derived terms

  • balle de break

Etymology 2

From earlier break de chasse, from English shooting brake.

Noun

break m (plural breaks)

  1. (automotive) estate car, station wagon
    Antonym: berline

References

  • “break” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English break.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbrɛk/

Noun

break m (invariable)

  1. break (intermission or brief suspension of activity)

Interjection

break

  1. break! (boxing)

References


Spanish

Noun

break m (plural breaks)

  1. break (pause)
  2. (tennis) break


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌst/
  • Rhymes: -ʌst
  • Homophones: bussed, bused

Etymology 1

From French buste < Italian busto, from Latin būstum.

Noun

bust (plural busts)

  1. A sculptural portrayal of a person’s head and shoulders.
  2. The breasts and upper thorax of a woman.
  3. (economics) The downward portion of a boom and bust cycle; a recession.
  4. (slang) A police raid or takedown of a criminal enterprise.
  5. (slang) A disappointment.
Derived terms
  • bust improver
  • busty
  • overbust
  • underbust
Translations

Etymology 2

From a variant of burst. Compare German Low German basten and barsten (to burst).

Verb

bust (third-person singular simple present busts, present participle busting, simple past and past participle busted or bust)

  1. (transitive, colloquial, chiefly US) To break.
    I busted my cooker while trying to fix it.
  2. (transitive, slang) To arrest (someone) for a crime.
  3. (transitive, slang) To catch (someone) in the act of doing something wrong, socially and morally inappropriate, or illegal, especially when being done in a sneaky or secretive state.
  4. (snowboarding) An emphatic synonym of do or get.
  5. (US, informal) To reduce in rank.
    • 1962, The Manchurian Candidate, 01:56:35
      If Steinkamp doesn’t take off that hat and stop messing around, I’m gonna bust him into a PFC.
  6. (finance, transitive) To undo a trade, generally an error trade, that has already been executed.
  7. (poker) To lose all of one’s chips.
  8. (blackjack) To exceed a score of 21.
  9. (transitive, slang) To break in (an animal).
  10. (intransitive, slang) To ejaculate; to eject semen.
  11. (journalism, intransitive) For a headline to exceed the amount of space reserved for it.
    • 1990, Paul Williams, The Computerized Newspaper: A Practical Guide for Systems Users (page 105)
      The temptation to squeeze in a favourite headline that busts by using the flexibility of new technology is often very strong.
    • 2007, Rob Steen, Sports Journalism: A Multimedia Primer (page 167)
      If your headline busts (breaks the confines of the layout) you will know straightaway. Similarly, the computer will inform you, in terms of the number of lines, how much longer or shorter the copy is in relation to the space allotted.
Synonyms
  • (to arrest for a crime): nick
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

bust (plural busts)

  1. (slang) The act of arresting someone for a crime, or raiding a suspected criminal operation.
  2. (slang) A failed enterprise; a bomb.
  3. (chess, informal) A refutation of an opening, or of a previously published analysis.
  4. (sports, derogatory) A player who fails to meet expectations.
Derived terms
  • or bust
Translations

Adjective

bust (not comparable)

  1. (slang) Without any money, broke, bankrupt.
    After months of financial problems, the company finally went bust.

Derived terms

  • bust up/bust-up
  • busted (adjective)
  • buster

Anagrams

  • BTUs, TBUs, but’s, buts, stub, tubs

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin būstum.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbust/

Noun

bust m (plural busts or bustos)

  1. bust (sculpture)
  2. bust (breasts and upper thorax)

Further reading

  • “bust” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

bust

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of bussen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of bussen

Romanian

Etymology

From French buste.

Noun

bust n (plural busturi)

  1. bust (sculpture)

Declension


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