break vs die what difference

what is difference between break and die

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: brāk, IPA(key): /bɹeɪk/, [bɹʷeɪ̯k]
  • Rhymes: -eɪk
  • Homophone: brake

Etymology 1

From Middle English breken, from Old English brecan (to break), from Proto-West Germanic *brekan, from Proto-Germanic *brekaną (to break), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreg- (to break). The word is a doublet of bray.

Verb

break (third-person singular simple present breaks, present participle breaking, simple past broke or (archaic) brake, past participle broken or (colloquial) broke)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To separate into two or more pieces, to fracture or crack, by a process that cannot easily be reversed for reassembly.
    1. (transitive, intransitive) To crack or fracture (bone) under a physical strain.
  2. (transitive) To divide (something, often money) into smaller units.
  3. (transitive) To cause (a person or animal) to lose spirit or will; to crush the spirits of.
    • 1613, William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, Henry VIII, Act IV, Sc. 2:
      An old man, broken with the storms of state,
      Is come to lay his weary bones among ye;
      Give him a little earth for charity
    1. To turn an animal into a beast of burden.
      • 2002, John Fusco, Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron
        Colonel: See, gentlemen? Any horse could be broken.
  4. (intransitive) To be crushed, or overwhelmed with sorrow or grief.
  5. (transitive) To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate.
    1. (transitive, theater) To end the run of (a play).
      • 1958, Walter Macqueen-Pope, St. James’s: Theatre of Distinction (page 134)
        In July Alexander broke the run and went on tour, as was his custom. He believed in keeping in touch with provincial audiences and how wise he was!
      • 1986, Kurt Gänzl, The British Musical Theatre: 1865-1914 (page 610)
        After Camberwell he broke the play’s season and brought it back in the autumn with a few revisions and a noticeably strengthened cast but without any special success.
  6. (transitive) To ruin financially.
    • With arts like these rich Matho, when he speaks, / Attracts all fees, and little lawyers breaks.
  7. (transitive) To violate, to not adhere to.
  8. (intransitive, of a fever) To pass the most dangerous part of the illness; to go down, in terms of temperature.
    Susan’s fever broke at about 3 AM, and the doctor said the worst was over.
  9. (intransitive, of a spell of settled weather) To end.
  10. (intransitive, of a storm) To begin; to end.
  11. (intransitive, of morning, dawn, day etc.) To arrive.
  12. (transitive, gaming slang) To render (a game) unchallenging by altering its rules or exploiting loopholes or weaknesses in them in a way that gives a player an unfair advantage.
  13. (transitive, intransitive) To stop, or to cause to stop, functioning properly or altogether.
    1. (specifically, in programming) To cause (some feature of a program or piece of software) to stop functioning properly; to cause a regression.
  14. (transitive) To cause (a barrier) to no longer bar.
    1. (specifically) To cause the shell of (an egg) to crack, so that the inside (yolk) is accessible.
    2. (specifically) To open (a safe) without using the correct key, combination, or the like.
  15. (transitive) To destroy the arrangement of; to throw into disorder; to pierce.
  16. (intransitive, of a wave of water) To collapse into surf, after arriving in shallow water.
  17. (intransitive) To burst forth; to make its way; to come into view.
    • 1800, William Wordsworth, The Fountain
      And from the turf a fountain broke, / And gurgled at our feet.
  18. (intransitive) To interrupt or cease one’s work or occupation temporarily.
  19. (transitive) To interrupt (a fall) by inserting something so that the falling object does not (immediately) hit something else beneath.
  20. (transitive, ergative) To disclose or make known an item of news, etc.
  21. (intransitive, of a sound) To become audible suddenly.
    • c. 1843,, George Lippard, The Battle-Day of Germantown, reprinted in Washington and His Generals “1776”, page 45 [2]:
      Like the crash of thunderbolts[…], the sound of musquetry broke over the lawn, […].
  22. (transitive) To change a steady state abruptly.
  23. (copulative, informal) To suddenly become.
  24. (intransitive) Of a male voice, to become deeper at puberty.
  25. (intransitive) Of a voice, to alter in type due to emotion or strain: in men generally to go up, in women sometimes to go down; to crack.
  26. (transitive) To surpass or do better than (a specific number), to do better than (a record), setting a new record.
  27. (sports and games):
    1. (transitive, tennis) To win a game (against one’s opponent) as receiver.
    2. (intransitive, billiards, snooker, pool) To make the first shot; to scatter the balls from the initial neat arrangement.
    3. (transitive, backgammon) To remove one of the two men on (a point).
  28. (transitive, military, most often in the passive tense) To demote, to reduce the military rank of.
    • 1926, T.E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, New York: Anchor (1991), p. 167:
      Sir Reginald Wingate, High Commissioner in Egypt, was happy for the success of the work he had advocated for years. I grudged him this happiness; for McMahon, who took the actual risk of starting it, had been broken just before prosperity began.
    • 1953 February 9, “Books: First Rulers of Asia”, in Time:
      And he played no favorites: when his son-in-law sacked a city he had been told to spare, Genghis broke him to private.
    • 1968, William Manchester, The Arms of Krupp, Back Bay (2003), →ISBN, page 215:
      One morning after the budget had failed to balance Finanzminister von Scholz picked up Der Reichsanzeiger and found he had been broken to sergeant.
    • 2006, Peter Collier, Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty, Second Edition, Artisan Books, →ISBN, page 42:
      Not long after this event, Clausen became involved in another disciplinary situation and was broken to private—the only one to win the Medal of Honor in Vietnam.
  29. (transitive) To end (a connection), to disconnect.
  30. (intransitive, of an emulsion) To demulsify.
  31. (intransitive, sports) To counter-attack.
  32. (transitive, obsolete) To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate.
  33. (intransitive) To become weakened in constitution or faculties; to lose health or strength.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, Verses on His Own Death
      See how the dean begins to break; / Poor gentleman he droops apace.
  34. (intransitive, obsolete) To fail in business; to become bankrupt.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Riches
      He that puts all upon adventures doth oftentimes break, and come to poverty.
  35. (transitive) To destroy the strength, firmness, or consistency of.
  36. (transitive) To destroy the official character and standing of; to cashier; to dismiss.
    • January 11, 1711, Jonathan Swift, The Examiner No. 24
      when I see a great officer broke.
  37. (intransitive) To make an abrupt or sudden change; to change the gait.
  38. (intransitive, archaic) To fall out; to terminate friendship.
    • c. 1700 Jeremy Collier, On Friendship
      To break upon the score of danger or expense is to be mean and narrow-spirited.
  39. (computing) To terminate the execution of a program before normal completion.
  40. (programming) To suspend the execution of a program during debugging so that the state of the program can be investigated.
  41. (computing) To cause, or allow the occurrence of, a line break.
Conjugation
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:break.
Synonyms
  • (ergative: separate into two or more pieces): burst, bust, shatter, shear, smash, split
  • (ergative: crack (bone)): crack, fracture
  • (transitive: turn an animal into a beast of burden): break in, subject, tame
  • (transitive: do that which is forbidden by): contravene, go against, violate
  • (intransitive: stop functioning): break down, bust, fail, go down (of a computer or computer network)
Antonyms
  • (transitive: cause to end up in two or more pieces): assemble, fix, join, mend, put together, repair
  • (tennis, intransitive: break serve): hold
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

break (plural breaks)

  1. An instance of breaking something into two or more pieces.
  2. A physical space that opens up in something or between two things.
  3. A rest or pause, usually from work.
  4. (Britain) a time for students to talk or play.
  5. A short holiday.
  6. A temporary split with a romantic partner.
  7. An interval or intermission between two parts of a performance, for example a theatre show, broadcast, or sports game.
  8. A significant change in circumstance, attitude, perception, or focus of attention.
  9. The beginning (of the morning).
  10. An act of escaping.
  11. (computing) The separation between lines, paragraphs or pages of a written text.
    • 2001, Nan Barber, ‎David Reynolds, Office 2001 for Macintosh: The Missing Manual (page 138)
      No matter how much text you add above the break, the text after the break will always appear at the top of a new page.
  12. (computing) A keystroke or other signal that causes a program to terminate or suspend execution.
  13. (programming) Short for breakpoint.
  14. (Britain, weather) A change, particularly the end of a spell of persistent good or bad weather.
  15. (sports and games):
    1. (tennis) A game won by the receiving player(s).
    2. (billiards, snooker, pool) The first shot in a game of billiards
    3. (snooker) The number of points scored by one player in one visit to the table
    4. (soccer) The counter-attack
    5. (surfing) A place where waves break (that is, where waves pitch or spill forward creating white water).
  16. (dated) A large four-wheeled carriage, having a straight body and calash top, with the driver’s seat in front and the footman’s behind.
  17. (equitation) A sharp bit or snaffle.
    • 1576, George Gascoigne, The Steele Glas
      Pampered jades [] which need nor break nor bit.
  18. (music) A short section of music, often between verses, in which some performers stop while others continue.
  19. (music) The point in the musical scale at which a woodwind instrument is designed to overblow, that is, to move from its lower to its upper register.
  20. (geography, chiefly in the plural) An area along a river that features steep banks, bluffs, or gorges (e.g., Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, US).
  21. (obsolete, slang) error [late 19th–early 20th c.]
Usage notes
  • music The instruments that are named are the ones that carry on playing, for example a fiddle break implies that the fiddle is the most prominent instrument playing during the break.
Synonyms
  • (instance of breaking something into two pieces): split
  • (physical space that opens up in something or between two things): breach, gap, space; see also Thesaurus:interspace or Thesaurus:hole
  • (rest or pause, usually from work): time-out; see also Thesaurus:pause
  • (time for playing outside): playtime (UK), recess (US)
  • (short holiday): day off, time off; see also Thesaurus:vacation
  • (beginning of the morning): crack of dawn; see also Thesaurus:dawn
  • (error): See Thesaurus:error
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Clipping of breakdown (the percussion break of songs chosen by a DJ for use in hip-hop music) and see also breakdancing.

Noun

break (plural breaks)

  1. (music) A section of extended repetition of the percussion break to a song, created by a hip-hop DJ as rhythmic dance music.
Derived terms
  • Amen break

References

  • break at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • 2001. The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music: North America. Garland Publishing. Ellen Koskoff (Ed.). Pgs. 694-695.

Anagrams

  • Abrek, Baker, Brake, baker, barke, brake

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʁɛk/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English break.

Noun

break m (plural breaks)

  1. break (pause, holiday)
    Synonym: pause
  2. (tennis) break (of serve)

Derived terms

  • balle de break

Etymology 2

From earlier break de chasse, from English shooting brake.

Noun

break m (plural breaks)

  1. (automotive) estate car, station wagon
    Antonym: berline

References

  • “break” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English break.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbrɛk/

Noun

break m (invariable)

  1. break (intermission or brief suspension of activity)

Interjection

break

  1. break! (boxing)

References


Spanish

Noun

break m (plural breaks)

  1. break (pause)
  2. (tennis) break


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /daɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Homophones: dye, Di, Dai, daye

Etymology 1

From Middle English deyen, from Old English dīeġan and Old Norse deyja, both from Proto-Germanic *dawjaną (to die). Displaced Old English sweltan.

Verb

die (third-person singular simple present dies, present participle dying, simple past and past participle died)

  1. (intransitive) To stop living; to become dead; to undergo death.
    1. followed by of; general use:
      • 1839, Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist, Penguin 1985, page 87:
        “What did she die of, Work’us?” said Noah. “Of a broken heart, some of our old nurses told me,” replied Oliver.
      • 2000, Stephen King, On Writing, Pocket Books 2002, page 85:
        In 1971 or 72, Mom’s sister Carolyn Weimer died of breast cancer.
    2. followed by from; general use, though somewhat more common in the context of medicine or the sciences:
      • 1865, British Medical Journal, 4 Mar 1865, page 213:
        She lived several weeks; but afterwards she died from epilepsy, to which malady she had been previously subject.
      • 2007, Frank Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson, Sandworms of Dune, Tor 2007, page 191:
        “Or all of them will die from the plague. Even if most of the candidates succumb. . .”
    3. followed by for; often expressing wider contextual motivations, though sometimes indicating direct causes:
      • 1961, Joseph Heller, Catch-22, Simon & Schuster 1999, page 232:
        Englishmen are dying for England, Americans are dying for America, Germans are dying for Germany, Russians are dying for Russia. There are now fifty or sixty countries fighting in this war.
      • 2003, Tara Herivel & Paul Wright (editors), Prison Nation, Routledge 2003, page 187:
        Less than three days later, Johnson lapsed into a coma in his jail cell and died for lack of insulin.
    4. (now rare) followed by with as an indication of direct cause:
      • 1600, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act III, Scene I:
        Therefore let Benedicke like covered fire, / Consume away in sighes, waste inwardly: / It were a better death, to die with mockes, / Which is as bad as die with tickling.
      • 1830, Joseph Smith, The Book of Mormon, Richards 1854, page 337:
        And there were some who died with fevers, which at some seasons of the year was very frequent in the land.
    5. (uncommon, nonstandard outside video games) followed by to as an indication of direct cause (like from):
      • 2014, S. J. Groves, The Darker Side to Dr Carter, page 437:
        Dr Thomas concluded she had died to a blow to the head, which led to a bleed on the brain, probably a fall and had hit her head hard on the wooden bedpost, as there was blood on the bedpost.
    6. (still current) followed by with as an indication of manner:
  2. (transitive) To (stop living and) undergo (a specified death).
    • 2019, Lou Marinoff, On Human Conflict: The Philosophical Foundations of War and Peace, Rowman & Littlefield (→ISBN), page 452:
      [] he chose instead to suffer even greater personal pain, with unimaginable fortitude and resolve, albeit for a shorter time. Thus he died a small death, in order to benefit the living. Similarly, a small and voluntary death was died by Socrates.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To yearn intensely.
    • 1598, Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act III, Scene II:
      Yes, and his ill conditions; and in despite of all, dies for him.
    • 2004 Paul Joseph Draus, Consumed in the city: observing tuberculosis at century’s end – Page 168
      I could see that he was dying, dying for a cigarette, dying for a fix maybe, dying for a little bit of freedom, but trapped in a hospital bed and a sick body.
  4. (rare, intransitive) To be or become hated or utterly ignored or cut off, as if dead.
    • 2015, Emily Duvall, Inclusions, page 150:
      “My dad [] beat us until we couldn’t sit down.” [] “What about your mother?” [] “She’s alive. [] My aunt visits her once a year, but I don’t ask about my mother. She died to me the day she chose my father over protecting us.” Luke’s voice hitched with emotion.
    • 2017, Mike Hoornstra, Descent into the Maelstrom, page 366:
      “You haven’t been my son since you were ten years old. That boy died to me the day he ran away. I don’t know you. You are merely a shell that resembles someone I used to know, but you are dead to me. You are the bringer of pain and death. Leave me be. Leave me with my son, Jyosh.” “Mother…” Barlun pleaded.
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) To become spiritually dead; to lose hope.
  6. (intransitive, colloquial, hyperbolic) To be mortified or shocked by a situation.
  7. (figuratively, intransitive, hyperbolic) To be so overcome with emotion or laughter as to be incapacitated.
    • 1976, an anchorman on Channel Five in California, quoted in Journal and Newsletter [of the] California Classical Association, Northern Section:
      I literally died when I saw that.
  8. (intransitive, of a machine) To stop working, to break down.
  9. (intransitive, of a computer program) To abort, to terminate (as an error condition).
  10. (intransitive, of a legislative bill or resolution) To expire at the end of the session of a legislature without having been brought to a vote.
  11. To perish; to cease to exist; to become lost or extinct.
    • letting the secret die within his own breast
    • Great deeds cannot die.
  12. To sink; to faint; to pine; to languish, with weakness, discouragement, love, etc.
    • His heart died within him, and he became as a stone.
  13. (often with “to”) To become indifferent; to cease to be subject.
  14. (architecture) To disappear gradually in another surface, as where mouldings are lost in a sloped or curved face.
  15. To become vapid, flat, or spiritless, as liquor.
  16. (of a stand-up comedian or a joke) To fail to evoke laughter from the audience.
Usage notes
  • In Middle and Early Modern English, the phrase is dead was more common where the present perfect form has died is common today. Example:
1611, King James Bible
I do not frustrate the grace of God: for if righteousness come by the law, then Christ is dead in vain. (Gal. 2:21)
Synonyms
  • (to stop living): bite the dust, bite the big one, buy the farm, check out, cross over, cross the river, expire, succumb, give up the ghost, pass, pass away, pass on, be no more, meet one’s maker, be a stiff, push up the daisies, hop off the twig, kick the bucket, shuffle off this mortal coil, join the choir invisible
  • See also Thesaurus:die
Derived terms
Related terms
  • dead
  • death
Translations

See die/translations § Verb.

Etymology 2

From Middle English dee, from Old French de (Modern French ), from Latin datum, from datus (given), the past participle of (to give), from Proto-Indo-European *deh₃- (to lay out, to spread out). Doublet of datum.

Noun

die (plural dies)

  1. The cubical part of a pedestal; a plinth.
  2. A device for cutting into a specified shape.
  3. A device used to cut an external screw thread. (Internal screw threads are cut with a tap.)
  4. A mold for forming metal or plastic objects.
  5. An embossed device used in stamping coins and medals.
  6. (electronics) (plural also dice) An oblong chip fractured from a semiconductor wafer engineered to perform as an independent device or integrated circuit.
  7. Any small cubical or square body.
    • Some young creatures have learnt their letters and syllables, and the pronouncing and spelling of words, by having them pasted or written upon many little flat tablets or dies.

Noun

die (plural dice)

  1. (plural dies nonstandard) An isohedral polyhedron, usually a cube, with numbers or symbols on each side and used in games of chance.
  2. (obsolete) That which is, or might be, determined, by a throw of the die; hazard; chance.
  3. (electronics) (plural also dies) An oblong chip fractured from a semiconductor wafer engineered to perform as an independent device or integrated circuit.
Usage notes

The game of dice is singular. Thus in “Dice is a game played with dice,” the first occurrence is singular, the second occurrence is plural. See also the usage notes under “dice”.

Synonyms
  • cube of chance
  • cube of fortune
Derived terms
  • loaded dice
  • the die is cast
  • tool and die
  • d4
  • d6
  • d8
  • d10
  • d12
  • d20
  • d66
  • d100
  • d666
  • d1000
Translations

See die/translations § Noun.

Etymology 3

Variant spelling.

Noun

die (plural dies)

  1. Obsolete spelling of dye

Verb

die (third-person singular simple present dies, present participle dying, simple past and past participle died)

  1. Obsolete spelling of dye
    • 1739, John Cay, An abridgment of the publick statutes in force and use from Magna Charta, in the ninth year of King Henry III, to the eleventh year of his present Majesty King George II, inclusive, Drapery, XXVII. Sect. 16:
      Also no dyer shall die any cloth, except he die the cloth and the list with one colour, without tacking any bulrushes or such like thing upon the lists, upon pain to forfeit 40 s. for every cloth. And no person shall put to sale any cloth deceitfully dyed,

Anagrams

  • ‘Eid, ‘eid, -ide, DEI, EDI, EID, Eid, IDE, IED, Ide, eid, ide

Afrikaans

Alternative forms

  • di (obsolete)

Etymology

From Dutch die, which is used only as a demonstrative in Dutch. The replacement of the article de with stronger die is also common in Surinamese Dutch and among non-native speakers of Dutch.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /di/
  • IPA(key): /‿i/ (article only; contracted form, particularly after prepositions and conjunctions)

Article

die (definite)

  1. the (definite article)

Pronoun

die

  1. this one, these; that one, those; he, she, it, they
    Ek het dokter toe gegaan en die het gesê ek moet in bed bly.

    I went to the doctor and he / she said I had to stay in bed.

Usage notes

  • The corresponding determiner (“this/that”, “these/those”) is usually spelt dié in order to distinguish it from the definite article. This spelling is also sometimes used for the pronoun, though this is unnecessary.

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diːə/, [ˈd̥iːə]

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic [Term?], from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁(y)- (to suck, suckle). Cognate with Latin fellō, Sanskrit धयति (dhayati, to suck). Compare causative dægge, Gothic ???????????????????????????? (daddjan, suckle).

Noun

die c

  1. breast milk, mother’s milk, when sucked from the breast
Derived terms
  • savndiet

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

die (imperative di, infinitive at die, present tense dier, past tense diede, perfect tense har diet)

  1. to suckle

References

  • “die,1” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • “die,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch die, a merger of Old Dutch thie, thē, thia, thiu and similar forms of the demonstrative. As in Old High German ther, der it replaced the original masculine and feminine nominative forms from Proto-Germanic *sa.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /di/
  • Hyphenation: die
  • Rhymes: -i

Determiner

die

  1. that (masculine, feminine); referring to a thing or a person further away.
    die boom

    that tree
    die vrouw

    that woman
  2. those (plural); referring to things or people further away.
    die vensters

    those windows
  3. (Suriname, colloquial) a certain, a particular; some; this; referring to a thing or a person that the speaker does not think is known to the audience.

Inflection

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: die
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: dida
  • Jersey Dutch:
  • Negerhollands: die, di, i, dida, da die

Pronoun

die m or f or pl

  1. (relative) who, whom, which, that
    Ik ken geen mensen die dat kunnen.

    I don’t know any people who can do that.
    Oh, maar ik ken iemand die dat wel kan!

    Oh, but I know somebody who can!

Usage notes

A preceding comma may alter the meaning of a clause starting with a relative pronoun. Compare the following sentences:

  • Alle arbeiders die staken zullen op sancties moeten rekenen.
    All workers who are on strike should expect sanctions.
  • Alle arbeiders, die staken, zullen op sancties moeten rekenen.
    All workers, who are on strike, should expect sanctions.

In the first sentence, only the workers on strike are advised to expect sanctions. In the second sentence, the parenthetical phrase indicates that all the workers are on strike, and should all expect sanctions.


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diː/ (stressed)
  • IPA(key): /dɪ/ (unstressed)
  • Rhymes: -iː

Article

die (definite)

  1. inflection of der:
    1. nominative/accusative singular feminine
    2. nominative/accusative plural

Declension

Pronoun

die (relative or demonstrative)

  1. inflection of der:
    1. nominative/accusative singular feminine
    2. nominative/accusative plural
      1. (in a subordinate clause as a relative pronoun) that; which; who; whom; whose
      2. (as a demonstrative pronoun) this one; that one; these ones; those ones; she; her; it; they; them

Usage notes

In a subordinate clause, die indicates a person or thing referenced in the main clause. It is used with plural or feminine singular antecedents.

Declension

Anagrams

  • Eid

Hunsrik

Alternative forms

  • ti (Wiesemann spelling system)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ti(ː)/

Article

die (definite)

  1. inflection of där:
    1. nominative/accusative singular feminine
    2. nominative/accusative plural all genders

Declension

Further reading

  • Online Hunsrik Dictionary

Interlingua

Noun

die (plural dies)

  1. A day.

Derived terms

  • De die in die (From day to day)
  • Un die (One day, sometime)
  • Le die sequente (The next day, the following day)

Italian

Etymology

From Latin diēs, back-formed from the accusative diem (whose vowel was once long), from Proto-Italic *djēm, the accusative of *djous, from Proto-Indo-European *dyew- (heaven, sky; to shine).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdi.e/
  • Hyphenation: dì‧e

Noun

die m (invariable)

  1. Obsolete form of .

Anagrams

  • -ide, dei, dèi

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈdi.eː/, [ˈd̪ieː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈdi.e/, [ˈd̪iːɛ]

Noun

diē

  1. ablative singular of diēs (“day”).
    Sine die.

    Without a day.

Mandarin

Romanization

die

  1. Nonstandard spelling of diē.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of dié.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch thie, thia, from Proto-Germanic *sa.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diə/, /di/

Article

die

  1. the; definite article.
Inflection

This article needs an inflection-table template.

  • Alternative nominative: de
  • Neuter nominative: dat
  • des; der; den
Descendants
  • Dutch: de
  • Limburgish: d’r, de

Determiner

die

  1. that, those
  2. who, which, that
Inflection

This determiner needs an inflection-table template.

  • Neuter nominative: dat
  • dies; dien; diere, dier
Descendants
  • Dutch: die, dat
  • Limburgish: dae
Further reading
  • “die (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “die (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Etymology 2

From Old Dutch thīo, from Proto-Germanic *þeuhą.

Noun

dië f or n

  1. thigh
Descendants
  • Dutch: dij
  • Limburgish: die, diech
Further reading
  • “die (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “die (IV)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page IV

Mirandese

Etymology

From Latin diēs.

Noun

die m (plural dies)

  1. day

Antonyms

  • nuite

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Probably from Danish die, from Old Danish di, from Germanic *dijana-, *dejana-

Verb

die (imperative di, present tense dier, passive dies, simple past and past participle dia or diet, present participle diende)

  1. to suck, suckle (of a baby on the breast)
  2. to breastfeed, nurse (of a mother with her baby)

References

  • “die” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “die_2” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Probably from Danish die, from Old Danish di, from Germanic *dijana-, *dejana-

Verb

die (present tense diar, past tense dia, past participle dia, passive infinitive diast, present participle diande, imperative di)

  1. to suck, suckle (of a baby on the breast)
  2. to breastfeed, nurse (of a mother with her baby)

Alternative forms

  • dia

References

  • “die” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

From Middle High German and Old High German diu, from Proto-Germanic *sa. Compare German die.

Article

die f (definite)

  1. the

Declension


Saterland Frisian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /di/
  • Hyphenation: die
  • Rhymes: -i

Etymology 1

From Old Frisian thī, from Proto-West Germanic *þa, from Proto-Germanic *sa. Cognates include West Frisian de and German der.

Article

die (unstressed de, oblique dän, feminine ju, neuter dät, plural do)

  1. the

Etymology 2

From Old Frisian thī, from Proto-West Germanic *þiʀ, from Proto-Germanic *þiz. Cognates include West Frisian dy and German dir.

Pronoun

die

  1. thyself, yourself
See also

Pronoun

die

  1. oblique of du; thee, you
See also

References

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “die”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

Yola

Alternative forms

  • dei

Etymology

From Middle English day, from Old English dæġ, from Proto-West Germanic *dag.

Noun

die

  1. day

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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